Improving Systems, Practices and Outcomes

RP Products by Topic: Teaming and Collaboration

from the DEC Recommended Practices on Teaming and Collaboration:

Educational programs and services for young children who have or are at risk for developmental delays and disabilities, by their nature, always involve more than one adult. The quality of the relationships and interactions among these adults affects the success of these programs. Teaming and collaboration practices are those that promote and sustain collaborative adult partnerships, relationships, and ongoing interactions to ensure that programs and services achieve desired child and family outcomes and goals.

Teaming and Collaboration Checklists

  • This checklist outlines steps teams can take to ensure that families are included as full team members and valued as experts who are considered vital to effective team functioning.

    All team members, including families, will be involved and engaged in various ways and to varying degrees over time. Families will be supported to increase their level of involvement as comfort and trust build and as the team grows and learns together.

    The checklist can be used by team members individually or together to determine whether true collaboration is taking place.

  • This checklist provides examples of quality communication skills, both verbal and written, which are the basis for building team relationships needed to work together effectively and gather/convey vital information for providing services and supports for children and families. The checklist can be used by team members to assess whether quality communication is taking place during all formal and informal team interactions (e.g., during intake, assessment, team meetings, and ongoing intervention interactions) and to develop a plan for any improvements that may be needed.

  • This checklist provides steps team members can take to share and gain expertise in order to provide effective interventions that meet the unique needs of individual children.

    A team that uses adult learning/teaching strategies to share knowledge and skills has a much better chance of achieving this outcome than any one team member working alone.

    The checklist can be used by team members individually or together to determine if they are using a variety of opportunities, both formal and informal, to focus on growing and learning together.

Teaming and Collaboration Illustrations

  • The "IFSP" Video

    This video shows an IFSP (could also apply to IEP) meeting gone wrong. In watching, pay careful attention to how the family was not a full team member. Compare your observations to the second half of the video in which many points of poor team functioning are explained, including the parents role.

    Video courtesy WWW: Illinois Early Intervention Training Program.

    Bri IFSP Video Chapter 4.3

    The first 3 minutes of this video illustrates "Families are full team members."

    Video courtesy WWW: Illinois Early Intervention Training Program.

  • The "IFSP" Video

    This video shows an IFSP (could also apply to IEP) meeting gone wrong. In watching, pay careful attention to how the family was not a full team member. Compare your observations to the second half of the video in which many points of poor team functioning are explained, including the parents role.

    Video courtesy WWW: Illinois Early Intervention Training Program.

    Conversation with Examples of Attending and Active Listening

    A conversation between two early childhood team members using active listening.

    Video courtesy WWW: CONNECT at Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute.

    Everybody Loves Raymond Uses Active Listening

    A Clip from the TV series Everybody Loves Raymond that illustrates active-reflective listening practice.

    Video courtesy WWW: Parent Effectiveness Training.

  • What Intervention Can (and Should) Look Like

    In this second of a three-part series, three service providers describe coaching and mentoring and give examples of their use in visits with family team members.

    Video courtesy WWW: Virginia Early Intervention Professional Development Center.

    Adult Learning Principle #4: Active Practice and Participation are Key!
    Go to: Active Practice and Participation are Key!

    Part of a series on Adult Learning Principles, this describes how adults need time to practice a new skill. Includes 2 examples highlighting different approaches with different results.

    Courtesy WWW: Virginia Early Intervention Professional Development Center.

    Adult Learning Principle #5: Feedback is How We Grow
    Go to: Feedback is How We Grow

    Part of a series on Adult Learning Principles, this describes how adults need time to practice a new skill. Includes two examples highlighting different approaches with different results.

    Courtesy WWW: Virginia Early Intervention Professional Development Center.

    How to Run an Effective Team Meeting

    Practical information on the importance of team meetings and what a good team meeting looks like and contains.

    Video courtesy WWW: Rasheed Ogunlaru.

Evaluation Icon:

We would sincerely appreciate your feedback, opinions and suggestions through your participation in this painless survey.

Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center

  • CB 8040
  • Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040
  • phone: 919.962.2001
  • fax: 919.966.7463
  • email: ectacenter@unc.edu

The ECTA Center is a program of the FPG Child Development Institute of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, funded through cooperative agreement number H326P120002 from the Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent the Department of Education's position or policy.

  • FPG Child Development Institute
  • OSEP's TA&D Network:IDEAs that Work