April 13, 2018

In this Issue:

  1. Best Practice Resources for Co-Regulation and Self-Regulation Skills
      Source: Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation (OPRE), FPG Child Development Institute, and Duke Center for Child and Family Policy
  2. Study Finds Universal Preschool is most Cost-Effective
      Source: The Hechinger Report
  3. New Study Brings Insight into Parental Choices in Early Education
      Source: New America
  4. Hot Topics in Neonatology
      Source: American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine & NIC University

1. Best Practice Resources for Co-Regulation and Self-Regulation Skills

Source: Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation (OPRE), FPG Child Development Institute, and Duke Center for Child and Family Policy

Research studies have measured positive outcomes in infants and toddlers when care-givers intentionally model self-regulation skills. The highest positive child outcomes were found in cognitive abilities, language learning and stress management, followed by interpersonal and emotional skills. For additional information, read these resources from OPRE, FPG and the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy on best practices for developing co- and self-regulation skills for infants through young adults:

2. Study Finds Universal Preschool is most Cost-Effective

Source: The Hechinger Report

What if low-income pre-K children have better outcomes in programs with higher income children? According to this recent Hechinger Report (April 2018), a new study from Dartmouth College about universal preschool reveals this to be the case. When the end-of-year test scores were compared between low-income children who had attended preschool and those who had not, it was found that low-income children who shared preschool programs with peers from other economic backgrounds scored the best. The study's cost-benefit analysis revealed that although universal preschool is more expensive since it serves more children, it ends up being more cost-effective because low-income children perform so much better. Read the full study for more information.

3. New Study Brings Insight into Parental Choices in Early Education

Source: New America

This recent policy brief from New America (April 2018) reviews a study that compares how parents search and choose child care centers for their 4 year olds versus Head Start or state pre-K programs. The study revealed that many parents found difficulties in the search process and were less likely to choose their preferred child care program. With the recent funding increase for child care subsidies, it is predicted that the number of parents searching for quality child care will also increase. It will behoove stakeholders to understand parents' motivations and frustrations so that they can provide the necessary information to lessen the burdens parents face when searching for a quality early education program.

4. Hot Topics in Neonatology

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine & NIC University

In this recent video from NIC University (January 2018), Dr. Karen Puopolo discusses her revisions to the American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Report on Management of Neonates with Suspected or Proven Early-Onset Bacterial Sepsis. Dr. Puopolo explains that clinicians should think about risk assessment for bacterial sepsis between term and pre-term babies separately, as there are different situations, treatments, and complications to consider between the two populations. For example, some objective data from the mother can be used with term babies for assessing the risks; whereas, pre-term babies usually have a variety of other medical issues interacting with the bacterial infection, and age of infant and rate of infection must be considered to determine treatment options.

NICUniversity.org is a news and educational resource for the neonatology community.