November 10, 2017

In this Issue:

  1. Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit
      Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation & Policy Development
  2. Early Childhood Program Participation (ECPP) - Survey Results
      Source: National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences
  3. A QRIS Practical Data User's Guide
      Source: BUILD Initiative & QRIS National Learning Network
  4. Dual Language Learners: A National Demographic and Policy Profile
      Source: Migration Policy Institute
  5. Supporting Parents: How Six Decades of Parenting Research Can Inform Policy and Best Practice
      Source: Society for Research in Child Development
  6. Education Inequalities at the School Starting Gate
      Source: Economic Policy Institute

1. Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation & Policy Development

Pay for Success (PFS) is a model used to support evidence-based methods by utilizing private funds to help resolve societal issues, typically followed by government funds used to repay the private funders once measurable, positive outcomes are achieved. This new tool kit (October 2017) is an introductory guide for local, state, and other stakeholders interested in exploring how to implement a PFS project for improving early education outcomes. It provides information and resources to assist stakeholders in determining if PFS is a suitable financing strategy for them.

2. Early Childhood Program Participation (ECPP) - Survey Results

Source: National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences

The ECPP Survey collects data about children (ages 0 to 6) who are not yet enrolled in kindergarten and their participation in relative care, non-relative care, and center-based care programs. The survey also collects information from parents about the main reason for choosing care, what factors were important to parents when choosing a care arrangement, and parents' participation in various learning activities with their children. This report released by the National Center for Education Statistics in September 2017 presents a data analysis of the 2016 survey results.

3. A QRIS Practical Data User's Guide

Source: BUILD Initiative & QRIS National Learning Network

A new resource released from the BUILD Initiative & QRIS National Learning Network (October 2017) was designed to support states' early childhood integrated data system, based on the 10 key considerations for integrating and linking early childhood data from the U.S. Department of Education and Health and Human Services. Some topics covered are data communities as ecosystems, data literacy, and developing a data focus.

4. Dual Language Learners: A National Demographic and Policy Profile

Source: Migration Policy Institute

The Migration Policy Institute published a fact sheet with data comparing dual language learner (DLL) and non-DLL populations at national and state levels. The data includes age and enrollment, race, income and poverty levels, parental English proficiency and education, and primary languages spoken in DLL households. An overview of state policies designed to support DLLs and their families access quality early care/early education programs is also provided.

5. Supporting Parents: How Six Decades of Parenting Research Can Inform Policy and Best Practice

Source: Society for Research in Child Development

According to a recent Social Policy Report, the U.S. lacks programs aimed to support at risk families and promote effective parenting, when compared to other developed nations. Learn what 60 years of research can teach us about the elements of competent parenting and policy recommendations for supporting at risk parents in this report.

6. Education Inequalities at the School Starting Gate

Source: Economic Policy Institute

The Economic Policy Institute has released a new report (September 2017) after reviewing data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and 12 case studies to measure performance gaps in children by social class. The findings suggest that performance gaps have continued at the same level over 2 generations, and economic crisis during this period could partially explain the lack of improvement. Policy recommendations are included at the end of the report encouraging "greater investments in pre-K programs and continued comprehensive support for children through their academic years, including meaningful engagement of parents and communities, if we are to substantially improve the odds for disadvantaged children."