June 17, 2016

In this Issue:

  1. New Joint ED-HHS Report on Importance of Supporting Early Learning Workforce
      Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - June 14, 2016
  2. New Research on the Effects of Early Childhood Homelessness
      Source: Children's Health Watch - June 2016
  3. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online
      Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - June 2016
  4. A First Look: Key Data Highlights on Equity and Opportunity Gaps in Our Nation's Public Schools
      Source: Office for Civil Rights - June 7, 2016
  5. Funding Opportunity - National Comprehensive Center on Improving Literacy for Students with Disabilities
      Source: U.S. Department of Education - June 8, 2016

1. New Joint ED-HHS Report on Importance of Supporting Early Learning Workforce

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - June 14, 2016

The U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services have released a report highlighting the importance of supporting the early learning workforce - most of whom are women - not only to improve the quality of early learning programs, but also to ensure fair pay so that they can support their own families. The report summarizes the research base and includes recommendations for reaching pay parity across all early learning settings.

Go to http://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/earlylearning/index.html for more information. The report was released at the United State of Women Summit on June 14, 2016.

2. New Research on the Effects of Early Childhood Homelessness

Source: Children's Health Watch - June 2016

A new research report, Compounding Stress: The Timing and Duration Effects of Homelessness on Children's Health (June 2016), finds that there is no safe level of early childhood homelessness. The younger and longer a young child experiences homelessness, the greater the cumulative toll of negative outcomes, which can have lifelong consequences for the child, the family, and the community.

3. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - June 2016

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/38/2

What Equivocal Data From Single Case Comparison Studies Reveal About Evidence-Based Practices in Early Childhood Special Education

Jennifer R. Ledford, Erin E. Barton, Jessica K. Hardy, Katie Elam, Jordan Seabolt, Meredith Shanks, M. L. Hemmeter, and Ann Kaiser

Early Intervention for Children With Behavior Problems in Summer Settings: Results From a Pilot Evaluation in Head Start Preschools

Katie C. Hart, Paulo A. Graziano, Kristine M. Kent, Aparajita Kuriyan, Alexis Garcia, Madison Rodriguez, and William E. Pelham, Jr.

Vocabulary of Toddlers Who Are Late Talkers

Michelle MacRoy-Higgins, Valerie L. Shafer, Katlin J. Fahey, and Elyssa R. Kaden

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

4. A First Look: Key Data Highlights on Equity and Opportunity Gaps in Our Nation's Public Schools

Source: Office for Civil Rights - June 7, 2016

Initial results from the 2013-14 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) have been published in a new report, A First Look: Key Data Highlights on Equity and Opportunity Gaps in Our Nation's Public Schools (June 2016). The report includes information on suspension and expulsion from public preschool (page 3) and on the availability of free or partial-payment preschool (page 5).

5. Funding Opportunity - National Comprehensive Center on Improving Literacy for Students with Disabilities

Source: U.S. Department of Education - June 8, 2016

A notice inviting applications for a new award to establish a National Comprehensive Center on Improving Literacy for Students with Disabilities (the Center) was recently published in the Federal Register. The Center will support children in early childhood education programs through high school who are at risk of not attaining full literacy skills due to a disability. It will be administered jointly by the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) and the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE). The application deadline is July 25, 2016.