July 24, 2015

In this Issue:

  1. Toolkit To Enrich Children's Early Language Experiences
      Source: Too Small to Fail and the U.S. Depts. of Health and Human Services and Education - July 22, 2015
  2. 2015 KIDS COUNT Data Book
      Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation - July 22, 2015
  3. Resilience Booster: Parent Tip Tool
      Source: American Psychological Association (APA) - July 20, 2015
  4. Parent Checklist to Help Ensure that Children Thrive at School
      Source: U.S. Department of Education - July 20, 2015
  5. International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - New Issue Available
      Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - July 20, 2015

1. Toolkit To Enrich Children's Early Language Experiences

Source: Too Small to Fail and the U.S. Depts. of Health and Human Services and Education - July 22, 2015

The quantity and quality of words very young children are exposed to through talking, reading, and singing can have important benefits to their brain development and school readiness. A new toolkit of resources, Talk, Read, Sing Together, Every Day! provides tip sheets in both English and Spanish for families, preschool teachers, and infant/toddler teachers and caregivers that can be used to help enrich children's early language experiences beginning from birth. The toolkit also includes a factsheet on the benefits of being bilingual and embracing children's home languages.

2. 2015 KIDS COUNT Data Book

Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation - July 22, 2015

Since 1990 KIDS COUNT has examined trends and ranked states on child well-being across four domains: (1) Economic Well-Being, (2) Education, (3) Health and (4) Family and Community. The latest report, 2015 KIDS COUNT Data Book, finds overall improvements in the areas of child health and education. However, the number of children living in poverty has risen from 13.2 million to 16.1 million since 2008, the number of children living in high-poverty neighborhoods is the highest since 1990, and on many indicators, children of color continue to face steep barriers to success. Minnesota ranks highest for child wellbeing, followed by New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Iowa, and Vermont. Arizona, Nevada, Louisiana, New Mexico and Mississippi rank lowest.

3. Resilience Booster: Parent Tip Tool

Source: American Psychological Association (APA) - July 20, 2015

Although it may be difficult for families to change circumstances such as housing, employment and transportation, there are many things they can do to reduce the effects of stress on young children and help them develop resilience, which is the ability to recover from or adjust to adversity or change. Resilience, when supported appropriately, can develop throughout childhood. This Resilience Booster: Parent Tip Tool (2015) was created by the APA for parents who want to build their children's resilience.

4. Parent Checklist to Help Ensure that Children Thrive at School

Source: U.S. Department of Education - July 20, 2015

This new Parent Checklist includes key questions, tips, and resources that parents and caregivers can use to help ensure that their children are getting the education they deserve. It was developed by the U.S. Department of Education in collaboration with America Achieves, National Council of La Raza, National PTA, and the United Negro College Fund. A blog in English and Spanish provides more information.

The checklist follows the recent release of the Set of Rights from the Department outlining what families should be able to expect for their children's education - from access to quality preschool to an affordable, quality college degree.

5. International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - New Issue Available

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - July 20, 2015

The June 2015 issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is now available online. INT-JECSE is an open-access, peer reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. View the June 2015 Table of Contents with abstracts and links to the full-text articles.