February 6, 2015

In this Issue:

  1. New Report on Screening for Behavioral and Emotional Problems
      Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - January 26, 2015
  2. Four Pieces Address Expulsion and Suspension Practices in Early Learning Settings
      Source: American Psychological Association - Retrieved February 4, 2015
  3. When Brain Science Meets Public Policy: Strategies for Building Executive Function Skills in the Early Years
      Source: Institute for Child Success - Retrieved February 3, 2015
  4. Quality Early Childhood Programs Found to Reduce Special Education Placements in Third Grade
      Source: American Educational Research Association - February 3, 2015
  5. Common Education Data Standards Version 5 Released
      Source: National Center for Education Statistics - February 02, 2015

1. New Report on Screening for Behavioral and Emotional Problems

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - January 26, 2015

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has published a new report, Promoting Optimal Development: Screening for Behavioral and Emotional Problems (Pediatrics, published online January 26, 2015, doi: 10.1542/peds.2014-3716). The report reviews the prevalence of behavioral and emotional disorders in children and discusses factors affecting the emergence of such problems; the importance of developmental screening and intervention; barriers to screening and strategies to overcome those barriers; and potential changes at the practice and systems level to facilitate successful behavioral and emotional screening. The report includes an appendix highlighting screening instruments that can be used in primary care settings for different age groups, including young children aged 0-5.

2. Four Pieces Address Expulsion and Suspension Practices in Early Learning Settings

Source: American Psychological Association - Retrieved February 4, 2015

Preschool expulsions occur at a significantly higher rate than that of grades K-12 and are greatly disproportionate to young boys of color. Part of President Obama's "My Brother's Keeper Initiative" encourages states, early childhood programs, and families to partner in preventing, reducing, and eventually eliminating the expulsion and suspension of young children from early learning programs. Recently, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Children and Families (ACF) worked with the American Psychological Association (APA) who highlighted this issue by hosting the following four pieces on Psychology Benefits Society, a blog from the APA Public Interest Directorate:

These pieces follow the release in December 2014 of the Policy Statement on Expulsion and Suspension Practices in Early Learning Settings by the U.S. Departments of Education (ED) and Health and Human Services (HHS).

3. When Brain Science Meets Public Policy: Strategies for Building Executive Function Skills in the Early Years

Source: Institute for Child Success - Retrieved February 3, 2015

The Institute for Child Success recently published a new brief, When Brain Science Meets Public Policy: Strategies for Building Executive Function Skills in the Early Years (January 2015). The brief discusses the importance of executive function and self-regulatory skills in early childhood, the developmental course of these skills, the critical role of early caregivers, and recommendations to support the development of these important skills. Some of the recommendations include: adopt a two-generation approach to policy and practice; invest in programs and practices that strengthen adult caregiver capacity; use place-based, public-private strategies and tools; and expand early developmental screening, practices, and interventions.

4. Quality Early Childhood Programs Found to Reduce Special Education Placements in Third Grade

Source: American Educational Research Association - February 3, 2015

A new study from Duke University adds to the growing body of research showing that quality early childhood programs can have lasting benefits to children and society. The researchers looked at how investments in two early childhood initiatives in North Carolina (Smart Start and More at Four) affected the likelihood that children would be placed in special education by the end of third grade from 1995 to 2010. Findings showed that investments in these programs reduced the odds of third-grade special education placement by 39%, resulting in academic benefits for the children and significant cost savings for the state. See the news release here.

Citation: Muschkin, C.F., Ladd, H.F., and Dodge, K.A. (2015). Impact of North Carolina's Early Childhood Initiatives on Special Education Placements in Third Grade, Education Evaluation and Policy Analysis (published online before print February 2, 2015, doi: 10.3102/0162373714559096)

5. Common Education Data Standards Version 5 Released

Source: National Center for Education Statistics - February 02, 2015

The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is pleased to announce the release of Common Education Data Standards (CEDS) Version 5. CEDS is a national collaborative effort to develop voluntary, common data standards for a key set of education data elements to enable more consistent and comparable data to be used throughout all education levels and sectors, both within and across states. Version 5 spans P-20W (early learning through workforce). New and updated early learning elements can be viewed by selecting "Early Learning" in the "Filter by Domain" drop-down menu and then "new" or "updated" CEDS elements.