August 1, 2014

In this Issue:

  1. Where's Baby? Look Before You Lock
      Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Early Childhood Development - July 28, 2014
  2. Promising Practices for Children Experiencing Homelessness
      Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Early Childhood Development - Retrieved July 29, 2014
  3. Code Switching: Why It Matters and How to Respond
      Source: National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness - July 24, 2014
  4. Funding Opportunity Announcements from the Office of Head Start
      Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Head Start - July 21, 2014

1. Where's Baby? Look Before You Lock

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Early Childhood Development - July 28, 2014

Heatstroke is the leading non-traffic, non-crash cause of death for children. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Early Childhood Development (ECD) recently joined with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to remind families and child care providers to never leave a child unattended in a vehicle, not even for a minute. A child's body heats up three to five times faster than an adult's body and heatstroke deaths have been recorded in 11 months of the year in nearly all 50 states. More than half of heatstroke deaths occurred when a distracted caregiver forgot a quiet child was in the vehicle. Thirty percent of children who died in a hot car gained access to an unlocked vehicle. For more facts and safety tips for early learning and care providers, go to http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd/interagency-projects/look-before-you-lock. Learn more about the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's "Where's Baby? Look Before You Lock" campaign at http://www.safercar.gov/parents/heatstroke.htm

2. Promising Practices for Children Experiencing Homelessness

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Early Childhood Development - Retrieved July 29, 2014

A new brief, Promising Practices for Children Experiencing Homelessness: A Look at Two States (July 2014), provides an overview of the effects of homelessness on developing children from birth to age six and highlights work that two states - Massachusetts and Oregon - have done to improve early childhood outcomes for young children experiencing homelessness. The brief also presents recommendations for how states can learn from the policies established in Massachusetts and Oregon to develop their own interventions. It was developed by the Office of Early Childhood Development, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

3. Code Switching: Why It Matters and How to Respond

Source: National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness - July 24, 2014

Young children who are dual language learners (DLLs) often code switch or mix different languages in the same sentence while speaking. It is important that teachers, home visitors, and others who work with these children understand what code switching is, the role it plays in language development, and how to respond to it. The Office of Head Start's National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness has published a new workbook, Code Switching: Why It Matters and How to Respond (July 2014). The workbook defines and describes code switching, identifies who code switches, and explains why code switching matters. It also includes examples of how adults can provide strong language models for children when they code switch. It can be used as a professional development tool for individuals or in group training activities.

4. Funding Opportunity Announcements from the Office of Head Start

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Head Start - July 21, 2014

The Office of Head Start recently released the following two funding opportunity announcements (FOAs:

These competitive grant opportunities will expand access to high-quality, comprehensive services for low-income infants and toddlers and their families. Applications must be submitted by October 6, 2014