December 6, 2013

In this Issue:

  1. National Scan of State Policies Shows Increasing Emphasis on Early Education in 2013
      Source: Education Commission of the States - December 2, 2013
  2. Pushing Toward Breakthroughs: Using Innovative Practice to Address Toxic Stress
      Source: Center for Developing Child at Harvard University - December 4, 2013
  3. Driving Science-Based Innovation in Policy and Practice: A Logic Model
      Source: Center for Developing Child at Harvard University - December 4, 2013
  4. Early Childhood Development: the Promise, the Problem, and the Path Forward
      Source: Brookings Institute - November 25, 2013
  5. New Directions in Child Abuse and Neglect Research
      Source: Institute of Medicine and National Research Council of the National Academies - December 3, 2013

1. National Scan of State Policies Shows Increasing Emphasis on Early Education in 2013

Source: Education Commission of the States - December 2, 2013

The Education Commission of the States (ECS) has published a new report, 2013 Legislative Session - P-3 Policies (November 2013), by Emily Workman, which looks at the work states across the country are doing to strengthen their early childhood systems. Using the results of a national scan of enacted policies from the 2013 legislative sessions, the report finds that state policymakers are increasingly recognizing the benefits of early learning and developmental services for young children. It highlights ways in which they are strengthening their early childhood systems in areas such as governance, funding, program access, family engagement, teacher preparation/certification, assessment, Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS), Home Visiting and more.

2. Pushing Toward Breakthroughs: Using Innovative Practice to Address Toxic Stress

Source: Center for Developing Child at Harvard University - December 4, 2013

The Center for Developing Child at Harvard University has published a new article, Pushing Toward Breakthroughs: Using Innovative Practice to Address Toxic Stress (December 2013), in its multi-part series entitled, Tackling Toxic Stress. This final installment describes how a small but growing group of forward-thinking social service practitioners are using the expanding scientific evidence about the long-term, damaging effects of toxic stress to try innovative approaches that target its root causes and could lead to breakthroughs in the effectiveness of interventions - for both children and their caregivers.

3. Driving Science-Based Innovation in Policy and Practice: A Logic Model

Source: Center for Developing Child at Harvard University - December 4, 2013

The Center for Developing Child at Harvard University has published a new, narrated interactive logic model showing how policies and programs that strengthen specific kinds of caregiver and community capacities can build the foundations of healthy development. These support beneficial biological adaptations in the brain and other organ systems, which lead to positive outcomes in health and development across the lifespan. See Driving Science-Based Innovation in Policy and Practice: A Logic Model

4. Early Childhood Development: the Promise, the Problem, and the Path Forward

Source: Brookings Institute - November 25, 2013

The Brookings Institute recently published a paper, Early Childhood Development: the Promise, the Problem, and the Path Forward (November 2013), by Tamar Atinc and Emily Gustafsson-Wright. The authors discuss the gains to be had from investing in early childhood development programs toward improved health and education for millions of children under five around the world.

5. New Directions in Child Abuse and Neglect Research

Source: Institute of Medicine and National Research Council of the National Academies - December 3, 2013

Each year, approximately six million children are involved in reports of child maltreatment to child protective services and many more cases go unreported. The majority of reports involve children under the age of 5. The long-term consequences of child abuse and neglect impact not only the children, but also their families, future relationships, and society as a whole. In 1993, the National Research Council (NRC) issued "Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect," which provided an overview of the research on child abuse and neglect. A new report, New Directions in Child Abuse and Neglect Research (2013), updates the 1993 report. The report reviews research from the past 20 years and recommends that a coordinated, multidisciplinary national research infrastructure with high-level federal support be established and implemented immediately.