August 2, 2013

In this Issue:

  1. Early Care and Education State Budget Actions FY 2013
      Source: National Conference of State Legislatures - August 1, 2013
  2. Libby Doggett to Be Appointed New Early Learning Deputy Assistant Secretary
      Source: U.S. Department of Education - July 30, 2013
  3. New Guidance Documents from the Office of Special Education Programs
      Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs - July 23, 2013
  4. Markers that Matter: Success Indicators in Early Learning and Education
      Source: Foundation Strategy Group - July 17, 2013

1. Early Care and Education State Budget Actions FY 2013

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures - August 1, 2013

The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) has published new findings from a survey of 21 state legislative fiscal offices on their FY 2013 state appropriations for early care and education programs (child care, prekindergarten, home visiting and other related programs). Some key findings show that overall, state appropriations to early care and education increased slightly compared to FY 2012, child care reductions were less pronounced compared to previous years, prekindergarten continued to rebound with fewer severe reductions, and home visiting budgets expanded by combining federal and state resources.

2. Libby Doggett to Be Appointed New Early Learning Deputy Assistant Secretary

Source: U.S. Department of Education - July 30, 2013

In a July 30, 2013 Bulletin, the U.S. Department of Education announced that Dr. Libby Doggett will be named Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Early Learning. She will lead the Office of Early Learning within the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE), which jointly administers the Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) program with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Doggett recently directed the Pew Home Visiting Campaign, which promotes effective state policies and investments in quality, home-based programs for vulnerable new and expectant families. Prior to that, she directed Pre-K Now, Pew's 10-year campaign to advance high-quality, voluntary preschool throughout the country.

3. New Guidance Documents from the Office of Special Education Programs

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs - July 23, 2013

The U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) recently published the following guidance documents related to implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA):

  • Letter of Clarification on Part C System of Payments (SOP) (July 19, 2013) - This letter is a response to state questions about implementing the SOP provisions of the 2011 Part C regulations of the IDEA, specifically about: (1) parental consent requirements; (2) parental consent for the use of private insurance to pay for Part C services; and (3) the SOP and fees provisions under the 2011 Part C regulations.
  • Memo and Q&A on Part B Dispute Resolution (July 23, 2013) - This memorandum and Q&A provides guidance on mediation, State complaint procedures, due process complaints and hearing procedures, the resolution process and expedited due process hearings. It updates three previous memoranda, as well as a previous Q&A document.

A subset of OSEP policy letters related to the early childhood provisions of the IDEA (Part C and Part B, Section 619) can be accessed on the ECTA Center Web site.

4. Markers that Matter: Success Indicators in Early Learning and Education

Source: Foundation Strategy Group - July 17, 2013

The Foundation Strategy Group (FSG), with support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has published a new report, Markers that Matter: Success Indicators in Early Learning and Education (July 2013), by Hallie Preskill, Nathalie Jones, and Afi Tengue. The report identifies a synthesized set of 48 early childhood indicators that reflect healthy development of young children. The indicators were synthesized and prioritized with input from over two dozen expert advisors after reviewing over 1,100 indicators from 11 existing early childhood indicator sets. The authors also identify gaps where more research is needed, particularly to develop indicators that reflect the increasing diversity among young children and their families in the U.S. The indicators can be used to support the healthy development of young children, to better understand and address inequities across racial and cultural groups, and to provide a common language that facilitates communication and coordination on behalf of all young children.