July 27, 2012

In this Issue:

  1. NSCAW II Wave 2 Report Child Well-Being
      Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - July 27, 2012
  2. Outcomes for Children Served Through IDEA's Early Childhood Programs: 2010-11
      Source: Early Childhood Outcomes Center - July 27, 2012
  3. 2012 KIDS COUNT Data Book: State Trends in Child Well-Being
      Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation - July 25, 2012
  4. First Findings From the Kindergarten Rounds of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study
      Source: National Center for Education Statistics - Retrieved July 25, 2012
  5. Child Care Aware of America Releases "In the States" Interactive Map
      Source: Child Care Aware of America - Retrieved July 24, 2012
  6. Background Checks: It is Time to Protect Children in Child Care
      Source: Child Care Aware of America - July 17, 2012
  7. Cognitive Changes May Be Only Sign of Fetal Alcohol Exposure
      Source: National Institutes of Health - July 23, 2012

1. NSCAW II Wave 2 Report Child Well-Being

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - July 27, 2012

The second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW II) is a longitudinal study intended to answer fundamental questions about children who come in contact with the child welfare system. The study's first report, NSCAW II Wave 2 Report Child Well-Being (July 2012), is now available online. Eighteen months after the close of investigation, children reported for maltreatment were found to be below their peers in social-emotional, cognitive, language, daily living skills, behavioral, and social skill-based domains. 34.5% of children 1 to 5 years old showed risk of developmental delay on standardized measures; 6.5% had both an established medical condition and developmental delay; overall, 42.3% were found to be potentially eligible for services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The study is sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

2. Outcomes for Children Served Through IDEA's Early Childhood Programs: 2010-11

Source: Early Childhood Outcomes Center - July 27, 2012

The Early Childhood Outcomes Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), recently published a summary of outcomes data for young children with delays or disabilities who received services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 2010-11. The summary shows that between 68% and 73% of children birth through age 2 showed greater than expected growth across three outcomes (social relationships, knowledge and skills, action to meet needs) and 81% of children aged 3 through 5 showed greater than expected growth across the three outcomes. For more findings, see Outcomes for Children Served Through IDEA's Early Childhood Programs: 2010-11 (July 2012).

3. 2012 KIDS COUNT Data Book: State Trends in Child Well-Being

Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation - July 25, 2012

The Annie E. Casey Foundation recently released its 23rd annual KIDS COUNT data book, which has been expanded to include 16 indicators of child well-being organized across four domains: (1) economic well-being, (2) education, (3) health, and (4) family and community. 2012 KIDS COUNT Data Book: State Trends in Child Well-Being (July 2012) finds that children's education and health has improved in most states. In 2010, 92% of children had health insurance and 47% of 3 to 4 year olds attended preschool. However, children's economic well-being has declined, with 22% living in poverty and 1 out of 3 having parents without secure employment. Racial and ethnic minority children faced higher rates of poverty than white children (38% of African American children, 35% of American Indian children, 32% of Hispanic children, 13% of white children). The report features National and state profiles, state rankings, and an interactive KIDS COUNT Data Wheel.

4. First Findings From the Kindergarten Rounds of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study

Source: National Center for Education Statistics - Retrieved July 25, 2012

The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) recently released First-Time Kindergartners in 2010-11: First Findings From the Kindergarten Rounds of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011), providing a snapshot of 3.5 million kindergartners who were attending kindergarten in the U.S. for the first time in the 2010-11 school year. Key findings include:

  • Reading and math assessment scores were lowest for first-time kindergartners in households with incomes below the federal poverty level and highest for those in households with incomes at or above 200 percent of the federal poverty level.
  • Assessment scores increased with parental education level.
  • Kindergartners with a primary home language of English scored higher in reading and math than those coming from homes with a primary home language other than English.
  • Kindergartners with parents whose highest level of education is a Bachelor's degree or higher had a lower BMI (body mass index) than those whose parents' highest level of education is a high school diploma/equivalent or lower.

5. Child Care Aware of America Releases "In the States" Interactive Map

Source: Child Care Aware of America - Retrieved July 24, 2012

Child Care Aware of America (formerly NACCRRA) has released an "In the States" Interactive Map that includes information about child care licensing in each state, a link to the state page from Child Care Aware of America's reports reviewing child care center and family child care home policies in every state, and a link to Child Care Aware of America's one-page fact sheet with child care information related to the demographics in the state, the price of child care, and other data related to child care.

6. Background Checks: It is Time to Protect Children in Child Care

Source: Child Care Aware of America - July 17, 2012

Child Care Aware of America (formerly NACCRRA, the National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies), has released a new white paper that outlines the elements of background checks needed to ensure that children are safe in child care settings. Background Checks: It is Time to Protect Children in Child Care (July 2012) includes state-by-state background check requirements for child care providers, finding that only 10 states require a comprehensive background check before allowing individuals to work in child care centers and only nine states require a comprehensive check before granting a child care license to people operating child care programs out of their homes.

7. Cognitive Changes May Be Only Sign of Fetal Alcohol Exposure

Source: National Institutes of Health - July 23, 2012

According to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and researchers in Chile, most children exposed to high levels of alcohol in the womb do not develop the distinct facial features seen in fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), but instead show signs of language delays, hyperactivity, attention deficits or intellectual delays. To learn more, see the NIH press release.