January 13, 2012

In this Issue:

  1. New AAP Policy Statement on Early Childhood Adversity and Toxic Stress
      Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - January 1, 2012
  2. NIH Study Shows HIV-Exposed Children at High Risk of Language Delay
      Source: National Institutes of Health - January 9, 2012
  3. Meta-analysis - Preference for Infant-Directed Speech in Preverbal Young Children
      Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - January 9, 2012
  4. How Early Learning Challenge Grant Recipients are Targeting Infants & Toddlers
      Source: ZERO TO THREE - January 10, 2012

1. New AAP Policy Statement on Early Childhood Adversity and Toxic Stress

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - January 1, 2012

In the January 1, 2012 issue of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published a new policy statement on the negative effects of toxic stress in young children, with recommendations for how the pediatric community can help mitigate the long-term impact of these effects on the course of development and health across the life span. Early Childhood Adversity, Toxic Stress, and the Role of the Pediatrician: Translating Developmental Science into Lifelong Health can be accessed online at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/1/e224.abstract

2. NIH Study Shows HIV-Exposed Children at High Risk of Language Delay

Source: National Institutes of Health - January 9, 2012

According to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions, children exposed to HIV have more than twice the chance of having a language impairment than children in the general population. The study found that 35 percent of a group of school-age children born to women with an HIV infection during pregnancy have difficulty understanding spoken words and expressing themselves verbally. The researchers suggest that children exposed to HIV before birth may benefit from routine screening for language impairment, even if they don't have any obvious signs of a language problem. To learn more, go to http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/releases/pages/010912-hiv-language-impairment.aspx

3. Meta-analysis - Preference for Infant-Directed Speech in Preverbal Young Children

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - January 9, 2012

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) has published a new CELLreview: Preference for Infant-Directed Speech in Preverbal Young Children (2012), by Carl J. Dunst, Ellen Gorman, and Deborah W. Hamby. This meta-analysis examined the influences of infant-directed and adult-directed speech on child preference for either type of speech. Results showed that naturally spoken infant-directed speech lasting more than 8 to 10 seconds was associated with more infant attention and preference and more social responsiveness compared to adult-directed speech. Implications for practice are described. The CELLreview is available at http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/

CELL is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs Research to Practice Division and is a major initiative of the Center for Evidence-Based Practices at the Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute.

4. How Early Learning Challenge Grant Recipients are Targeting Infants & Toddlers

Source: ZERO TO THREE - January 10, 2012

ZERO TO THREE recently published a snapshot that looks at the plans of the nine states that received four-year Early Learning Challenge (ELC) grants and highlights those state proposals that are specifically targeted to positively impact infants and toddlers. How Early Learning Challenge Grant Recipients are Targeting Infants & Toddlers (2011) is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/public-policy/elc-it-article-for-baby-monitor.pdf