October 22, 2010

In this Issue:

  1. The Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS) Nears Completion
      Source: Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS)
  2. Effective Early Childhood Education Programs: A Systematic Review
      Source: Johns Hopkins University, School of Education - Retrieved October 21, 2010
  3. OSERS Solicits Input for 35th Anniversary of IDEA
      Source: U.S. Department of Education and Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services - Retrieved October 19, 2010
  4. New Family Tool - Teaching Your Child to Become Independent with Daily Routines
      Source: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning - Retrieved October 21, 2010
  5. The Pyramid Model Story Project
      Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - Retrieved October 21, 2010
  6. Findings from a Study of Early Childhood Education Teacher Education Programs
      Source: Pennsylvania State University - Retrieved October 22, 2010

1. The Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS) Nears Completion

Source: Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS)

The Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS), funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences, is nearing completion. PEELS has been following a nationally representative sample of 3,104 children with disabilities who were 3-5 years of age in 2003-04. Findings from the study provide information on the characteristics of children receiving preschool special education, the services they receive, their transitions across educational levels, and their performance over time on assessments of academic and adaptive skills. PEELS data collection began in fall 2003 and was repeated in winter 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2009.

2. Effective Early Childhood Education Programs: A Systematic Review

Source: Johns Hopkins University, School of Education - Retrieved October 21, 2010

A new report published on the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (BEE) Web site provides an extensive review of the research on the outcomes of 27 early childhood programs for children aged three to five in a group setting. Six of the programs produced strong evidence of effectiveness. The effects for these programs were in the areas of language, literacy, and/or phonological awareness. All had explicit academic content, a balance of teacher-led and child-initiated activity, and significant training and follow-up support. To learn more, see Effective Early Childhood Education Programs: A Systematic Review (September 2010) at http://www.bestevidence.org/early/early_child_ed/early_child_ed.htm

The Best Evidence Encyclopedia is a free web site created by the Johns Hopkins University School of Education's Center for Data-Driven Reform in Education (CDDRE) under funding from the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.

3. OSERS Solicits Input for 35th Anniversary of IDEA

Source: U.S. Department of Education and Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services - Retrieved October 19, 2010

The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) is planning to celebrate the 35th anniversary of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and would like input from people who have been positively impacted by the IDEA. Individuals with disabilities, students, teachers, principals, researchers, parents, teacher trainers and other IDEA stakeholders are invited to share art work, photography, poetry and written stories showing how the IDEA has positively impacted their lives. Submissions will be accepted through November 8th on the 35th anniversary of IDEA Web site at https://www.osep-meeting.org/IDEA35th/

4. New Family Tool - Teaching Your Child to Become Independent with Daily Routines

Source: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning - Retrieved October 21, 2010

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) has published a new Family Tool to help parents and care-givers understand what self-help skills can be expected from young children and to provide tips for helping children learn how to become more independent with daily routines. It is available online at http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/documents/teaching_routines.pdf

5. The Pyramid Model Story Project

Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - Retrieved October 21, 2010

The Pyramid Model for Supporting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children is a conceptual framework of evidence-based practices developed by the Center for the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) and the Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI). TACSEI recently developed a new resource, the Pyramid Model Story Project, where the programs, professionals and families who have used the model can share their experiences. To contribute a story or to learn how others have benefited from use of the model, go to http://www.challengingbehavior.org/do/pyramid_model/pyramid_model_story_project.html

6. Findings from a Study of Early Childhood Education Teacher Education Programs

Source: Pennsylvania State University - Retrieved October 22, 2010

Researchers at Pennsylvania State University recently completed an investigation of 42 Early Childhood Education Teacher Education (ECETE) programs housed in major research universities within 38 states that support publically-funded Pre-Kindergarten. The researchers identified a number of tensions between early childhood education and elementary teacher education programs and developed recommendations to reduce these tensions. The study was funded by a grant from the Foundation for Child Development. The final policy brief, Penn State Study of Early Childhood Teacher Education (2010), is available online at https://www.ed.psu.edu/educ/news/news-items-oct2013dec-2010/FINAL%20FCD%20Report.pdf