September 11, 2009

In this Issue:

  1. New Federal Guidance on Preventing Swine Flu in Early Childhood Settings
      Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - September 4, 2009
  2. Webinar on Facilitating Early Childhood Transitions
      Source: National Early Childhood Transition Center - To be held September 18, 2009
  3. Examples of State Policy Initiatives To Improve Child Care for Infants and Toddlers
      Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - September 11, 2009
  4. Now Available in Spanish - Parent Training Modules on Promoting Children's Social and Emotional Skills
      Source: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning - Retrieved September 10, 2009
  5. Article Highlights the Economic Benefits of Advancing a Birth to Five Agenda
      Source: ZERO TO THREE - Retrieved September 8, 2009
  6. Updated Edition of MCH Knowledge Path on Children with Special Health Care Needs
      Source: Maternal and Child Health Library, Georgetown University - September 3, 2009
  7. What Works Clearinghouse Releases Report on "Let's Begin with the Letter People"
      Source: What Works Clearinghouse, Institute of Education Sciences - September 8, 2009

1. New Federal Guidance on Preventing Swine Flu in Early Childhood Settings

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - September 4, 2009

Among all age groups, children less than 5 years of age had the highest 2009 H1N1 (swine flu) hospitalization rates and the second-highest 2009 H1N1 incidence rates during April 15-July 24, 2009. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently published new guidance to help decrease the spread of flu in early childhood settings. The guidance suggests actions to take now, strategies to consider if the flu becomes more severe, and a checklist for decision-making at the local level. A related technical report examines what is known so far about swine flu in children and explains recommended strategies and suggestions.

Guidance Document - http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/childcare/guidance.htm
Technical Report - http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/childcare/technical.htm
Additional Resources - http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/childcare/

2. Webinar on Facilitating Early Childhood Transitions

Source: National Early Childhood Transition Center - To be held September 18, 2009

The National Early Childhood Transition Center (NECTC) is hosting a Webinar on September 18, 2009 at 1:00 PM EDT, entitled How Can We Facilitate Transitions? Choosing Practices and Strategies (Part 2). This webinar will present specific strategies that can be used to support transitions at ages 3 and 5, as well as strategies for supporting children from culturally diverse backgrounds and those with significant disabilities. Registration is now available online at http://www.hdi.uky.edu/nectc/webinar.aspx

3. Examples of State Policy Initiatives To Improve Child Care for Infants and Toddlers

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - September 11, 2009

As part of its Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project, the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) is profiling examples of policy initiatives that states are undertaking to improve child care for infants and toddlers. These state examples include links to relevant legislation and regulations, a description of how the state developed and implemented the policy, and any cost data and evaluations or other data. To learn more see State Examples from Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care, available at http://www.clasp.org/projects/page?id=0003

4. Now Available in Spanish - Parent Training Modules on Promoting Children's Social and Emotional Skills

Source: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning - Retrieved September 10, 2009

Parent Training Modules from the Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) are now available in Spanish. These modules provide information for families on how to promote children's social and emotional skills, understand their problem behavior, and use positive approaches to help them learn appropriate behavior. They are designed to give parents general information on key strategies that may be used with all children. They are available online at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel/parent.html

5. Article Highlights the Economic Benefits of Advancing a Birth to Five Agenda

Source: ZERO TO THREE - Retrieved September 8, 2009

A new article from ZERO TO THREE highlights the economic benefits of investing in the earliest years and provides a state example demonstrating these benefits. It includes tips and strategies for how your state or community can work with business leaders and economists to establish similar investments for infants, toddlers, and their families. A Proven Return on Investment: Economists and the Business Community Advance a Birth to Five Agenda (2009), by Kimberly Pearson, is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/Return_on_Investment.pdf?docID=9421

6. Updated Edition of MCH Knowledge Path on Children with Special Health Care Needs

Source: Maternal and Child Health Library, Georgetown University - September 3, 2009

The Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Library at Georgetown University has released a new edition of its knowledge path on Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN), which provides a variety of resources related to CSHCN for health professionals, program administrators, policymakers, educators, researchers, and families. Separate sections address specific aspects of care and development, such as early intervention and education, financing services, screening, and transition. The knowledge path will be updated periodically. It is available at http://www.mchlibrary.info/KnowledgePaths/kp_cshcn.html

7. What Works Clearinghouse Releases Report on "Let's Begin with the Letter People"

Source: What Works Clearinghouse, Institute of Education Sciences - September 8, 2009

The What Works Clearinghouse at the Institute of Education Sciences has released a new early childhood education report on Let's Begin with the Letter People, an early education curriculum that uses 26 thematic units to develop children's language and early literacy skills. To access the report go to http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/reports/early_ed/lblp/index.asp