June 5, 2009

In this Issue:

  1. New DEC/NAEYC Position Statement on Early Childhood Inclusion
      Source: DEC and NAEYC - June 4, 2009
  2. Creating a Healthier Future Through Early Interventions for Children
      Source: Journal of the American Medical Association - June 3, 2009
  3. Promising Early Returns: Educare Implementation Study Data
      Source: FPG Child Development Institute - Retrieved June 5, 2009
  4. Models for Using Title I ARRA Funds for Early Education
      Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - June 1, 2009
  5. More Children At-Risk Due to Lack of Food Than Previously Thought
      Source: Children's HealthWatch - Retrieved June 2, 2009
  6. Research Findings on Effective Components of Parent Training Programs
      Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Retrieved June 3, 2009

1. New DEC/NAEYC Position Statement on Early Childhood Inclusion

Source: DEC and NAEYC - June 4, 2009

The Division for Early Childhood (DEC) and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) have recently approved a joint position statement that underscores their commitment to quality early childhood inclusion. Early Childhood Inclusion: A Joint Position Statement of the Division for Early Childhood and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (2009) provides a shared national definition of inclusion as "the values, policies, and practices that support the right of every infant and young child and his or her family, regardless of ability, to participate in a broad range of activities and contexts as full members of families, communities, and society." The document, which was developed through a collaborative national process that the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPDCI) coordinated, represents the first time these two leading national organizations have partnered on a joint product that is expected to have a widespread impact on the early childhood field. It is available online at http://www.dec-sped.org/About_DEC/PositionConcept_Papers/Inclusion

2. Creating a Healthier Future Through Early Interventions for Children

Source: Journal of the American Medical Association - June 3, 2009

The June 3, 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) contains a commentary by James A. Mercy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which supports expanding early intervention programs that increase the exposure of disadvantaged young children to safe, stable and nurturing environments. The author points out that such programs lead to better developmental outcomes in childhood, better health in adulthood, reduced criminal behavior and important economic benefits to society. To read the commentary go to http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/301/21/2262

3. Promising Early Returns: Educare Implementation Study Data

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - Retrieved June 5, 2009

Educare is a state-of-the-art school open full day and full year serving at-risk children from birth to five years old. Educare provides quality learning environments to help its students arrive at kindergarten healthy and ready to learn. The FPG Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill leads the Bounce Learning Network Implementation Study of the Educare model. In the 2007-08 school year, 5 Educare programs from across the country participated. A recent brief, entitled Promising Early Returns: Educare Implementation Study Data (2009), reports promising preliminary findings. Evaluation data show that more years of Educare attendance are associated with better school readiness and vocabulary skills. The brief is available online at http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~Bounce/assets/pdf/Promising_Early_Returns_4_14_09.pdf

4. Models for Using Title I ARRA Funds for Early Education

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - June 1, 2009

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) has recently published a Web page entitled Models for Using Title I ARRA Funds for Early Education (2009), which provides information on how Title I recovery funds can be used to support high-quality early education programs and examples of school districts that have used Title I funds to invest in services from infant/toddler programs to pre-kindergarten classes to Head Start collaborations. It is available online at http://childcareandearlyed.clasp.org/titlei_arra.html

To see official guidance from the U.S. Department of Education on the use of Title I recovery funds go to http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/leg/recovery/programs.html

5. More Children At-Risk Due to Lack of Food Than Previously Thought

Source: Children's HealthWatch - Retrieved June 2, 2009

A new policy brief from Children's HealthWatch reports that more children are at risk due to lack of food than is often recognized. The data show that children and families classified as "marginally food secure" by the USDA are, in fact, significantly at risk for health problems, developmental delay, and impaired school performance due to lack of food compared to those in "food secure" households. The brief advocates for nutrition programs that reach a wider spectrum of children and families in need. Even Very Low Levels of Food Insecurity Found to Harm Children's Health (2009) is available online at http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org/upload/resource/chwbrief_FI.pdf

6. Research Findings on Effective Components of Parent Training Programs

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Retrieved June 3, 2009

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently conducted a meta-analysis of the current research literature on parent training programs, in order to identify components associated with better parent and child outcomes. The findings showed that teaching the following parenting skills had the greatest impact on improved outcomes: emotional communication, positive parent-child interaction, consistent responses to child behavior, and correct use of timeout. The study also found that offering a wide array of services may divert attention from the program's main objective of skills acquisition. The full report, entitled Parent Training Programs: Insight for Practitioners (2009), is available at http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/pub/parenting_meta-analysis.html