April 7, 2006

In this Issue:

  1. Issue Brief Highlights Medicaid Provisions in the Deficit Reduction Act That Affect Children and Families
      Source: MCH ALert - March 31, 2006
  2. From Science to Public Policy: Court Teams for Maltreated Infants and Toddlers
      Source: Zero to Three Policy Center - April 3, 2006
  3. Breaking Down Barriers Between Immigrant Families and Early Education
      Source: CLASP - April 3, 2006
  4. Grant notice - Secondary Data Analyses Based on the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development
      Source: Grants and Funding Opportunities (GFO) Alert - March 31, 2006
  5. 2006 Child Well-Being Index (CWI) Results
      Source: Foundation for Child Development - March 28, 2006
  6. Funding Opportunity: Child Care Bureau Research Scholars
      Source: Administration for Children and Families - Retrieved April 7, 2006

1. Issue Brief Highlights Medicaid Provisions in the Deficit Reduction Act That Affect Children and Families

Source: MCH ALert - March 31, 2006

The Deficit Reduction Act: A Review of Key Medicaid Provisions Affecting Children and Families reviews Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) changes, focusing on the benefits option, cost sharing rules, the new citizenship documentation requirement, and "Health Opportunity Account" demonstrations. The issue brief, published by the Center for Children and Families at the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, addresses pre-DRA rules, DRA provisions, and key implications. The report is available at http://jonesd.ihcrp.georgetown.edu/~jonesd3/reconbrief013006.pdf [Note: Link checked on 11/26/2007 - this document is no longer available online].

[Originally published in MCHAlert © 2006 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

2. From Science to Public Policy: Court Teams for Maltreated Infants and Toddlers

Source: Zero to Three Policy Center - April 3, 2006

Everyday in the United States, 118 infants are taken from their homes because their parents cannot care for them adequately. The youngest of children have the highest rates of maltreatment. Children between birth and three are 34% more likely to be placed in foster care than children between ages 4 and 11. Approximately 42% of these children demonstrate developmental delays that can have life-long implications if not properly addressed. This new article from the Zero to Three Policy Center describes one effective model that demonstrates how the science of infant-toddler development and mental health can help both professionals and policymakers work toward improving outcomes for infants and toddlers in the child welfare system. Available at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/Court_Teams_science_to_policy_final.pdf?docID=1927

3. Breaking Down Barriers Between Immigrant Families and Early Education

Source: CLASP - April 3, 2006

CLASP's Breaking Down Barriers project is intended to address the barriers immigrant families face in accessing high-quality early education programs. This presentation offers background and preliminary impressions from CLASP's site visits in sample states across the country and interviews with immigrant-serving organizations, immigrant community leaders, policymakers, and others. Challenges and barriers identified include: too few connections between early education providers and immigrant-serving organizations; too few bilingual and bicultural providers; and a lack of affordable, high-quality programs in communities. Available at http://www.clasp.org/publications/breakingdownbarriers.pdf

4. Grant notice - Secondary Data Analyses Based on the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

Source: Grants and Funding Opportunities (GFO) Alert - March 31, 2006

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) encourages scientists in the US and internationally to address research questions about family, child care, school, and child development through analyses of existing data sets from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. In particular, NICHD would like to see the data sets used by psychologists, sociologists, economists, statisticians, educators, policy makers, and physician scientists…. Having such a scientific body of knowledge has the potential of leading to a deep and comprehensive understanding of variations in families, child care settings, and schools, and of how such variations are linked to the development of children from different walks of life.

To access the complete notice, go to http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-284.html

5. 2006 Child Well-Being Index (CWI) Results

Source: Foundation for Child Development - March 28, 2006

According to the 2006 Child Well-Being Index (CWI), one of the nation's most comprehensive measurements of trends in the quality of life of children and youth, America has made great strides since 1975 in the well-being of children in many important areas but one: Education. For more information go to http://www.fcd-us.org/usr_doc/CWI_PressRelease_2006.pdf

6. Funding Opportunity: Child Care Bureau Research Scholars

Source: Administration for Children and Families - Retrieved April 7, 2006

Funding Opportunity Title: Child Care Bureau Research Scholars

Due Date For Letter of Intent: 04/26/2006
Due Date for Applications: 05/23/2006

Executive Summary: The Administration for Children and Families' (ACF), Administration on Children, Youth and Families' (ACYF), Child Care Bureau announces the availability of funds to support new CCB Research Scholars projects in Fiscal Year 2006. The Research Scholars grants are designed to increase the number of doctoral-level graduate students conducting dissertation research on child care policy issues consistent with the Bureau's research goals. For more information go to http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/grants/open/HHS-2006-ACF-ACYF-YE-0010.html [Note: Link checked on 11/26/2007 - this document is no longer available online. For other ACF grant opportunities go to http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/ ].