November 4, 2005

In this Issue:

1. Requests for Comments - Annual State Applications Under Parts C and B of the IDEA as Amended in 2004

Source: Federal Register: November 2, 2005 (Volume 70, Number 211)

The Department of Education invites comments on the following data collection forms (one for Part C and one for Part B):

  • Title: Annual State Application Under Part C of the IDEA as Amended in 2004
    Type of Review: Revision.
    Dates: An emergency review has been requested in accordance with the Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 3507 (j)), since public harm is reasonably likely to result if normal clearance procedures are followed. Approval by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has been requested by November 29, 2005.
    For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/2005-4/110205c.html
  • Title: Annual State Application Under Part B of the IDEA as Amended in 2004.
    Type of Review: Reinstatement.
    Dates: An emergency review has been requested in accordance with the Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 3507 (j)), since public harm is reasonably likely to result if normal clearance procedures are followed. Approval by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has been requested by December 2, 2005.
    For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/2005-4/110205b.html

2. Second Quarter 2005 OSEP Policy Documents on the Education of Infants, Toddlers, Children, and Youth with Disabilities

Source: OSEP - November 4, 2005

The second quarter 2005 OSEP policy documents on the education of infants, toddlers, children, and youth with disabilities (from April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005) are now available full-text online at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/letters/2005-2/index.html. Two of these specifically address the early childhood provisions of the IDEA (Part C and Section 619).

To access a complete collection of policy letters that address Part C and Section 619 of the IDEA from 2000 to the present go to http://www.nectac.org/idea/clarfctnltrs.asp.

3. Children's Bureau Discretionary Grant Awards - Model Development or Replication to Implement the CAPTA Requirement to Identify and Serve Substance-exposed Newborns

Source: Children's Bureau - November 1, 2005

The Children's Bureau recently awarded a number of discretionary grants and competitive cooperative agreements. Four of the grants are for model development or replication to implement the CAPTA requirement to identify and serve substance-exposed newborns. These grants of up to $250,000 per year for 5 years were made to:

  • Denver Department of Human Services, Denver, CO
  • University of Oregon, Office of Research Services and Administration, Eugene, OR
  • Saint Vincent Mercy Medical Center, Toledo, OH
  • Department of Public Health, Boston, MA
See http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/programs_fund/discretionary/2005.htm.

4. Early Care and Education: Realizing a Collective Vision

Source: National Economic Development and Law Center - Retrieved November 4, 2005

The National Economic Development and Law Center (NEDLC) developed a model to bring together diverse stakeholders to support early care and education programs for young children and promote awareness of the economic impact of these programs. Early care and education experts, business leaders, researchers, elected officials, and economic development professionals were convened in seven states (California, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Ohio) to advise NEDLC's research and develop policy recommendations to support early care and education in each state. Data and recommendations were compiled into state reports that included demographic information on the early care and education industry, the direct economic impact of the early care and education industry, returns on public investment in early care and education, and recommendations for strengthening the system.

This report describes how the model was implemented in these seven states, and it provides steps for implementing the model in other states, including setting policy agendas, developing effective messages, building relationships, and engaging new partners. It is meant to help states work towards a collective vision of early care and education by enhancing public awareness of the societal benefits of investing in programs for young children. Available online at http://www.insightcced.org/uploads///publications/ece/ecerealizing.pdf

5. Promising Practices: Reducing Medical Neglect of Infants and Toddlers

Source: Children's Bureau - November 1, 2005

Young children involved with the child welfare system have an urgent need for comprehensive health and developmental assessments, and they often need medical services. However, obtaining assessments and services for these infants and toddlers is challenging, especially for those in foster care. Responding to these needs, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia developed the Starting Young program, which provides evaluations and referrals for early intervention services, primary health care, and medical specialty care for children under 3 who are in foster care, kinship care, or living with biological parents with child welfare involvement. Children are referred to the program by child welfare workers from many different agencies throughout the region. For complete information go to http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=69&sectionid=1&articleid=1059l