November 2, 2004

In this Issue:

  1. Special Education: Improved Timeliness and Better Use of Enforcement Actions Could Strengthen Education's Monitoring System
      Source: www.gao.gov/ - Retrieved November 2, 2004
  2. Internet Chat Series on Promoting Social Emotional Competence
      Source: Center on Evidence-Based Practice: Young Children with Challenging Behavior - November 2, 2004
  3. Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Conference Call Series: Newborn Screening
      Source: AMCHP Pulse for Partners - October 29, 2004
  4. The Perkins Panda Early Literacy Program
      Source: Perkins School for the Blind - Retrieved November 1, 2004
  5. Pediatricians Can Help Immigrant Mothers By Explaining Child Development, NICHD Study Suggests
      Source: NIH News - November 1, 2004
  6. Survey Points to Gap in Developmental/Behavioral Pediatrics Training
      Source: The Commonwealth Fund - November 1, 2004

1. Special Education: Improved Timeliness and Better Use of Enforcement Actions Could Strengthen Education's Monitoring System

Source: www.gao.gov/ - Retrieved November 2, 2004

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) ensures the education of the nation's disabled children. As a condition of receiving IDEA funds, states must provide educational and related services that facilitate learning to students with disabilities based on their individual needs. The Department of Education (Education) is responsible for ensuring state compliance with the law. In recent years, questions have been raised about Education's oversight of IDEA. GAO agreed to determine how Education monitors state compliance with IDEA for children aged 3-21, the extent and nature of noncompliance found, and how Education has ensured that noncompliance is resolved once identified. GAO analyzed Education monitoring documents, interviewed state and federal officials, and visited 5 state special education offices.

To view highlights of the report go to: http://www.gao.gov/highlights/d04879high.pdf To view the full report go to: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d04879.pdf

2. Internet Chat Series on Promoting Social Emotional Competence

Source: Center on Evidence-Based Practice: Young Children with Challenging Behavior - November 2, 2004

The Center on Evidence-Based Practice: Young Children with Challenging Behavior is hosting a series of Internet Chats on topics related to supporting young children's social emotional development and preventing challenging behaviors. Leading experts in the field will participate in the following forums:

  • November 18, 2004 - Classroom Environments That Work: Preventing Problem Behavior
  • January 26, 2005 - Creating Home/Program Partnerships That Work: Supporting Children with Problem Behavior
  • March 30, 2005 - Leadership Strategies for Supporting Children's Social and Emotional Development and Addressing Challenging Behavior
For more information, go to: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel/chat.html

3. Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Conference Call Series: Newborn Screening

Source: AMCHP Pulse for Partners - October 29, 2004

On November 18, 2004, the National Association of County & City Health Officials and CityMatCH will host a conference call highlighting research, information and collaborative efforts between state and local public health agencies on newborn screening. Guest speakers from national, state and local public health agencies will discuss their experiences.

For additonal information go to http://www.naccho.org/general1217.cfm [Note: Link checked on 02/20/2009 - this item is no longer available online], or contact:
Angela Ablorh-Odjidja
Maternal and Child Health Project
Phone: 202-783-5550, ext. 262.
Email: aablorh@naccho.org

4. The Perkins Panda Early Literacy Program

Source: Perkins School for the Blind - Retrieved November 1, 2004

The Perkins School for the Blind recently launched the Perkins Panda Early Literacy Program, a unique compilation of materials that teach fundamental early literacy skills to children with visual impairments, ages birth to eight years old, and the parents, families and professionals who care for them. For additional information go to http://www.perkins.org/literacy/panda/

5. Pediatricians Can Help Immigrant Mothers By Explaining Child Development, NICHD Study Suggests

Source: NIH News - November 1, 2004

Groups of immigrant mothers from Japan and South America knew less about child development than did their European American counterparts, according to a study by researchers at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health. Such gaps in parenting knowledge, the authors wrote in the November issue of Pediatrics, could have a negative impact on children's development, with mothers possibly missing warning signs that their children need medical attention or early intervention services. The authors added that pediatricians could assist parents who lack knowledge of child development by taking steps to educate them about the topic. For more information go to http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/releases/immigrant.cfm.

6. Survey Points to Gap in Developmental/Behavioral Pediatrics Training

Source: The Commonwealth Fund - November 1, 2004

For pediatricians, managing issues of child development and behavior is essential for providing comprehensive preventive care. But according to a new Commonwealth Fund Issue Brief , some pediatric faculty members may lack the expertise necessary to provide comprehensive resident training in this subject. The Issue Brief draws on data from a Web-based survey e-mailed to nearly 1,700 members of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association from March to April 2004. Most of the pediatric faculty responding to the survey felt that too little time was devoted to training in this subject. Nearly all respondents agreed that enhancing faculty skills in this area would significantly improve residents' training but cited lack of release time and funding to attend continuing education as important barriers.

The Issue Brief, entitled A Need for Faculty Development in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics is available online at http://www.cmwf.org/usr_doc/785_Schor_faculty_devel_IB.pdf.