Improving Systems, Practices and Outcomes

System Framework: Resource Search

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System Framework
Component
Quality Indicator
Element of Quality
GV
Governance
FN
Finance
PN
Personnel/Workforce
AC
Accountability& Quality Improvement
QS
Quality Standards
1
Vision, mission, and/or purpose guide decisions and provide direction for quality comprehensive and coordinated Part C and Section 619 statewide systems.
2
Legal foundations (e.g. statutes, regulations, interagency agreements and/or policies) provide the authority and direction to effectively implement the Part C and 619 statewide systems.
3
Administrative structures such as state and regional and/or local system entities are designed to carry out IDEA and related federal and state mandates to ensure statewide implementation of the system including provision of services.
4
State and regional and/or local system entities enforce roles and responsibilities for implementing IDEA and other federal and state mandates.
5
State and regional and/or local system entities are designed to maximize meaningful family engagement in the development and implementation of the system.
6
State leadership advocates for and leverages fiscal and human resources to meet the needs for implementation and oversight of the statewide system and services.
7
Leaders use written priorities with corresponding strategic plan(s) and evaluation to drive ongoing system improvement.
8
Part C and 619 state staff or representatives use and promote strategies that facilitate clear communication and collaboration, and build and maintain relationships between and among Part C and Section 619 stakeholders and partners.
1
Part C and Section 619 state staff conduct finance planning to identify adequate resources at the state, and regional and/or local levels to meet program infrastructure and service delivery needs.
2
State and regional and/or local system entities use strategic finance plan to forecast a long-term and annual proposed budget to ensure a strong base of financial support is formed.
3
State and regional and/or local system entities have access to fiscal data for program planning, budget development and required reporting.
4
State and regional and/or local system entities use fiscal data to manage the budget.
5
State and regional and/or local system entities secure funds and resources so that funds can be allocated and distributed to meet the needs of the system in accordance with the finance plan.
6
Part C and Section 619 state staff coordinate and align resources and funding streams with other state agencies, programs and initiatives in order to improve system effectiveness, implement evidence-based practices and ensure efficient use of resources.
7
Part C and Section 619 state staff equitably allocate funds to meet the needs of the system, including children and families.
8
State and regional and/or local system entities use funds and resources efficiently and effectively to implement high quality programs for meeting the needs of children and families.
9
State and regional and/or local system entities disperse funds and make timely payments or reimbursement for allowable expenses.
10
State and regional and/or local system entities regularly monitor finances and resources to ensure that spending is in compliance with contract performance and all federal, state and local fiscal requirements.
1
A cross-sector leadership team is in place that can set priorities and make policy, governance, and financial decisions related to the personnel system.
2
There is a written multi-year plan in place to address all sub-components of the CSPD.
3
State personnel standards across disciplines are aligned to national professional organization personnel standards.
4
The criteria for state certification, licensure, credentialing and/or endorsement are aligned to state personnel standards and national professional organization personnel standards across disciplines.
5
Institution of higher education (IHE) programs and curricula across disciplines are aligned with both national professional organization personnel standards and state personnel standards.
6
Institution of higher education programs and curricula address early childhood development and discipline specific pedagogy.
7
A statewide system for inservice personnel development and technical assistance is in place for personnel across disciplines.
8
A statewide system for inservice personnel development and technical assistance is aligned and coordinated with higher education program and curricula across disciplines.
9
Comprehensive recruitment and retention strategies are based on multiple data sources, and revised as necessary.
10
Comprehensive recruitment and retention strategies are being implemented across disciplines.
11
The evaluation plan for the CSPD includes processes and mechanisms to collect, store, and analyze data across all subcomponents.
12
The evaluation plan is implemented, continuously monitored, and revised as necessary based on multiple data sources.
1
Ongoing statewide planning for accountability and improvement at all levels is informed by data and reflects strong leadership and commitment to positive outcomes for children and their families.
2
There is a written multi-year plan in place to address all sub-components of the CSPD.
3
Part C and 619 state staff and representatives collect adequate data to determine the quality and results of the systems and services.
4
Leadership at all levels have sufficient information to make accountability and improvement decisions.
5
Leadership at all levels, as appropriate, communicate and publicly report data and information through a variety of methods to document performance and evaluation results.
6
Leadership at all levels use strategies to support continuous improvement to achieve expectations, as articulated in the accountability and improvement plan.
7
Leadership at all levels work to enhance capacity to use data-informed practices to implement effective accountability and improvement schemes.
1
The state has articulated what children under age five, including children with disabilities, are expected to know and do.
2
Early childhood programs, including Part C and Section 619, use the child level standards to support the implementation of high-quality practices.
3
The state has an infrastructure in place to support the effective use of child level standards.
4
The state has articulated what constitutes quality in early care and education programs.
5
State Part C and Section 619 programs have articulated expectations for what constitutes high quality early intervention (EI) and early childhood special education (ECSE) services.
6
The state has an infrastructure in place to support the full range of programs in meeting program level standards.
a.
Core values, beliefs, guiding principles and current evidence-based practices are the foundation for public statements of vision/mission/purpose.
b.
These public statements are consistent with The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
c.
These public statements address who the program serves, what the program does and the intended outcomes for children and families.
d.
These public statements are developed with input from all stakeholders.
e.
These public statements are readily available (e.g. on the website, in a parent handbook, etc.) and effectively communicated to all stakeholders including practitioners, families, and community partners.
f.
These public statements are clear and understood by staff, local program administrators and families.
g.
System level decisions (e.g. fiscal, data, standards, personnel, monitoring), programmatic decisions (e.g. services and supports) and strategic planning are guided by the public statements of vision/mission/purpose.
h.
These public statements are reviewed and revised as necessary with stakeholder input.
i.
These Part C and 619 public statements of vision, mission and/or purpose are recognized as an integral part of the broader early care and education public statements and strategic plans.
a.
Legal foundations are aligned with IDEA and other federal and state mandates.
b.
Legal foundations are developed with input from stakeholders.
c.
Legal foundations are clearly written and provide details needed for implementation at the local level.
d.
Legal foundations support and do not hinder the implementation of evidence-based practices.
e.
Legal foundations are readily available and communicated to stakeholders and partners.
f.
Legal foundations provide the authority for the state to monitor implementation.
g.
Legal foundations are reviewed and revised as necessary with stakeholder input, using existing data and other pertinent information.
h.
Legal foundations support coordination of systems and services across all early care and education programs.
a.
Part C and 619 lead agencies assign all required components of IDEA and related federal and state mandates to entities within the state.
b.
Information about the state system components and how to access services is widely available and understood by providers, families and the general public.
c.
Decisions about Part C and 619 state, and regional and/or local system structures facilitate collaboration and service delivery across early care and education programs.
d.
Part C and 619 lead agencies design state, and regional and/or local entities to ensure equitable access to services statewide.
e.
Part C and 619 lead agencies evaluate the structure of entities assigned for state, regional and local implementation on an ongoing basis and revise as needed to ensure equitable delivery of services.
a.
State Part C and 619 agencies and partners have enforceable roles and responsibilities established through clearly written state laws, regulations, policies, procedures, contracts, or agreements.
b.
Regional and local entities have enforceable roles and responsibilities for provision of direct services established through clearly written state laws, regulations, policies, procedures, contracts, or agreements.
c.
Administrators, practitioners and other agency personnel, at all levels of the system, understand and perform their roles and responsibilities in accordance with the lines of decision-making within the state structure.
d.
There is an ongoing process for reviewing and revising, as necessary, the designation of roles and responsibilities.
a.
Decisions about system structures support equitable representation of families on the state Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC), local ICCs, task forces, and committees.
b.
Part C and 619 state staff or representatives support (e.g. through stipends, transportation, information and preparation, convenient time and location, mentoring, FTE, consulting fee) family members' active roles on councils, committees, and task forces to allow their full participation and input into system decisions related to areas such as policies, training and TA, monitoring, and program improvement.
c.
There are ongoing system-wide efforts to recruit families that are representative of the demographics of the state and local communities and support their leadership development.
d.
There is an ongoing process for evaluating and improving meaningful family engagement in the system.
a.
State leadership continuously uses information and data to identify fiscal and human resource needs for system implementation and oversight (personnel, data system, monitoring, standards, and finance).
b.
State leadership effectively seeks and garners federal, state, and/or local resources to meet the needs of the statewide system.
c.
State leadership allocates sufficient resources to perform the administrative duties and responsibilities required under IDEA and other state or federal mandates (e.g. Part C and 619 lead agency FTE, proportion of the budget for infrastructure vs. services).
d.
State leadership assists local programs/districts to problem-solve and identify creative strategies to address fiscal and human resource challenges to promote implementation of evidence-based practices.
e.
State leadership seeks and supports opportunities for collaborating with other agencies/community partners to share fiscal and human resources across all early care and education initiatives.
a.
The vision/mission/purpose drives Part C and 619 priorities and strategic plan(s).
b.
The priorities and strategic plan(s) are based on data (e.g. monitoring, data systems, demographic projections) about the systems and services.
c.
The priorities and strategic plan(s) are developed with input from all relevant stakeholders.
d.
The priorities and strategic plan(s) provide clear and detailed information with regard to short and long term goals, strategies, responsible individuals, timelines, and benchmarks for evaluation.
e.
The priorities and strategic plan(s) are sanctioned and supported by those in authority.
f.
The priorities and strategic plan(s) are coordinated or aligned across agency partners (Part C, 619 and other early care and education initiatives) to ensure collaborative impact.
g.
The priorities and strategic plan(s) are transparent and communicated with all stakeholders.
h.
Part C and 619 state staff or representatives monitor the progress of the priorities and strategic plans and review and revise them as necessary based on data on progress and changing context.
a.
A written formal communication process is in place that includes multi-level strategies detailing how information is shared, input is received, and responses are given (feedback loops) with stakeholders and partners at all levels of the system.
b.
Part C and 619 state staff or representatives monitor progress of the written communication process, reviewing and revising it as necessary, based on data on progress and changing context.
c.
Leaders use and encourage strategies that promote frank, respectful discussions and facilitate the development and maintenance of long-term collaborative relationships across agencies and partners.
d.
Leaders continuously gather and use information from stakeholders and partners at all levels of the system to inform decisions, influence state policy, and improve the system.
e.
Leaders regularly inform legislators, funders and public/private partners about the benefits and accomplishments of Part C and 619, and the continuing needs of the system related to the strategic plan.
f.
Leaders implement an effective public awareness campaign to ensure families and referral sources are aware of the benefits of program and how to access services.
a.
Finance planning uses demographic information of children potentially eligible for the IDEA program and their eligibility for other early care and education programs/funding streams (e.g., Title I, Early/Head Start, state Pre-K) to project the amount of financial resources needed overtime and determine how and which resources to access.
b.
Finance planning includes a review of program costs, projected revenues and expenditures, and estimated need to garner the resources necessary to support and sustain the system.
c.
Part C and Section 619 state staff conduct fiscal mapping of federal, state, local, and private resources to better connect existing funding sources, identify opportunities for cost savings and assure that all potential resources are accessed.
d.
Family leaders, key partners (e.g., Early/Head Start, state Pre-K, Medicaid) and program and fiscal staff, who are knowledgeable about specific funding streams, are involved in discussions and decision-making.
e.
Part C and Section 619 state staff conduct a cost-benefit analysis of potential funding sources and develop clear, detailed financing strategies, specifying which funding stream(s) would be most beneficial to pursue for what purpose/service or function.
f.
A clearly written finance plan aligns with the program priorities and strategic plan(s), the program public statements of vision, mission and/or purpose, and articulates measurable goals and activities.
g.
The finance plan is available and effectively communicated to stakeholders, including state and local administrators, fiscal staff, funding partners, practitioners, and families.
h.
The finance plan is reviewed and revised, as necessary, including identification of additional financial resources and unexpected fiscal changes to ensure that sufficient funding is available to meet changing needs (e.g., demographics, political and economic context).
a.
A proposed budget is developed to forecast the amount of funds needed from each funding source to operate the system for the year as well as a projection of the funds needed to operate the system in the long-term.
b.
Trend analyses of children and families served, services provided and funds expended are conducted to predict future budget and personnel needs for use in short and long term planning.
c.
State and regional and/or local entities have adequate budgetary control and flexibility regarding use funds and resources to support system implementation and improvement.
d.
The proposed budget aligns with the public statements of vision/mission and/or purpose of the broader early care and education system.
e.
The Governor, legislators and state leaders actively support budget appropriation requests from the system.
a.
A coordinated state-wide means of collecting timely and accurate fiscal data on revenue and expenditures, by specific fund source, is in place with the ability to disaggregate fiscal and program data by region and/or program.
b.
Data checks and other mechanisms are in place to ensure the accuracy and reliability of fiscal data.
c.
Fiscal data are linked to programmatic data (e.g., number of referrals, referral source, child count, units of service) to allow for analysis of the amount of funds spent.
d.
Fiscal reports on distribution and expenditure of funds by specific fund source are generated and shared to inform fiscal and program staff of financial status, to facilitate resource management, and to meet state and federal fiscal reporting requirements.
e.
Training and technical assistance are provided systematically to state, regional and/or local entities on how to access and use fiscal data.
f.
Part C and Section 619 state staff make fiscal and programmatic data readily available in a variety of formats that can be used by stakeholders (e.g., ICC, SAC, legislators and the general public) for advocacy in the procurement of funds.
g.
Part C and Section 619 state staff make fiscal data readily available in a variety of formats that can be used by state, regional and/or local structures for accountability and program improvement.
h.
Relevant fiscal data (e.g., expenses by service, region and/or local entity, and fund source) are shared among early care and education programs to assess efficient and effective use of resources and to inform budgetary decisions in the alignment and coordination of early care and education systems.
i.
A systematic process is in place to evaluate and determine whether the means of collecting and disseminating fiscal data is providing data that is useful to stakeholders.
a.
Fiscal data on revenues, planned expenses and actual expenditures are tracked and used on an ongoing basis to manage fiscal resources.
b.
Fiscal data are used to inform budget development, adjustment and re-distribution of funds and resources based on service and program needs.
c.
Fiscal data are sources of information that drive program improvement and effective utilization of funding sources.
a.
State and regional and/or local fiscal and programmatic staff are aware of the operating budget that is in place and what funds are available for the system to use.
b.
A formal process (e.g., budget line item, designated account number) is in place to ensure that appropriated funds are designated for use only by the system.
c.
State and regional and/or local system entities are informed about legal requirements (e.g., Maintenance of Effort (MOE), system of payments, fiscal accountability), related to accessing and using funds and resources that support programs and services.
d.
Families are generally informed about the fiscal process and their fiscal responsibilities.
e.
Families understand their financial obligations, if any, for receiving services as well as the cost of providing services.
f.
Additional funds are secured, as necessary, based on review of demographic, fiscal and program data.
g.
State and regional and/or local administrative and fiscal staff have clearly defined roles and responsibilities for accessing available funds to support the system.
a.
Collaboration and coordination of resources across state agencies, programs and initiatives (e.g., early care and education, health) occurs through review and alignment of fiscal and programmatic policies and activities.
b.
Specific mechanisms (e.g., policy, Interagency Agreements (IAs), Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs), Medicaid state plan amendments, waivers, and guidance) clearly articulate service, programmatic and funding responsibilities.
c.
Administrative requirements for accessing funding sources are minimized and aligned to reduce burden on regional and/or local entities.
d.
Regional and/or local entities are encouraged to pursue partnerships across agencies, programs and initiatives (e.g., early care and education, health) to leverage resources.
e.
Partners across state agencies, programs and initiatives and at all levels of the system clearly communicate on an on-going basis regarding agency responsibilities related to requirements for funding sources.
f.
There is an ongoing process for reviewing and revising, as necessary, the clear designation of agency roles and responsibilities reflected in state, regional and/or local mechanisms (e.g., policy, IAs, MOUs, Medicaid state plan amendments, waivers, and guidance).
a.
Resource allocation is based on data to address geographic and demographic differences and needs (e.g., cost study, reimbursement rate for services, formula based on critical variables).
b.
The allocation process is designed to support and fund the implementation of evidence-based practices (e.g., environment, instruction, teaming and collaboration) and high quality programs.
c.
The method of fund and resource allocation is predictable, transparent and communicated to stakeholders.
d.
The allocation process facilitates and promotes collaboration and shared resources across early care and education programs (e.g., shared program functions, match dollars).
e.
Data are gathered on an ongoing basis to evaluate if the fund and resource allocation process addresses the needs of the program, including children and families.
f.
The allocation process is reviewed and revised as necessary based upon available data.
a.
Funds and resources are used in accordance with the state's vision, mission and/or purpose for the early intervention or early childhood special education system.
b.
Implementation of fiscal policies and procedures related to using funds and resources for provision of high quality programs is supported through guidance and on-going technical assistance.
c.
State and regional and/or local funds and resources are prioritized to facilitate active implementation of evidence-based practices (e.g., inclusion, coaching, teaming).
d.
Funds and resources are used to support alignment and collaboration across early care and education programs.
e.
State and regional and/or local system entities comply with federal, state and local requirements related to use of funds and resources.
f.
The effective and efficient use of funds is reviewed and revised as necessary to support high quality programs.
a.
Policies and procedures are current and explicit, specifying compliance with federal, state and local requirements (e.g., Maintenance of Effort (MOE), payor of last resort, non-supplanting) and describing how financial transactions are approved and paid.
b.
All payment mechanisms (e.g., contracts, grants, vouchers, central finance system) adhere to state and federal requirements regarding use of funds and resources.
c.
Payment mechanisms identify inconsistencies in use of funds and resources so that corrections can be made.
d.
Programs and practitioners make available information and documentation needed to account for use of funds and/or bill for reimbursement.
e.
Fiscal data on services provided and resources used to support each child and family (e.g., expense reports, unit costs) are compared to those services identified on the Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)/Individualized Education Program (IEP) in order to verify accuracy and process payments, if appropriate.
f.
A system of checks and balances is in place that describes separation of responsibilities across personnel for approving expenditures and making payments.
g.
Payment policies and procedures and payment mechanisms are reviewed and revised as necessary.
a.
Fiscal data, methods and tools are used to monitor districts/contractors/practitioners' performance and compliance with federal and state requirements, as well as contracts, if applicable.
b.
Fiscal data, methods and tools are used to evaluate if districts/contractors/practitioners' use of funds to help achieve the program's public statements of vision, mission and/or purpose.
c.
Policies and procedures are reviewed to ensure they reflect all fiscal mandates.
d.
State and regional and/or local system entities participate in fiscal audits, as required, to comply with federal, state and local fiscal mandates.
e.
Fiscal monitoring data are shared with districts/contractors/practitioners for informing improvement planning.
f.
Fiscal noncompliance is corrected in a timely manner when identified through fiscal monitoring or audits in accordance with requirements.
g.
Sanctions are used to address programs/practitioners that are unable to timely correct non-compliance and/or are not fiscally sound (e.g., financially secure, have cash on-hand to keep agency in operation).
h.
Fiscal monitoring methods and tools are reviewed and revised as necessary.
i.
Monitoring methods and tools are aligned whenever possible with other early care and education programs.
a.
The composition of the leadership team represents key partners from cross-sector early childhood systems, technical assistance programs, institutions of higher education, parent organizations as well as any other relevant stakeholders across disciplines.
b.
Additional stakeholder input, including from families, is actively solicited and considered by the leadership team in setting priorities and determining governance decisions.
c.
The leadership team members are aware of other related early childhood and school-age personnel development systems and align efforts when appropriate.
d.
The leadership team develops an overall vision, mission and purpose for the CSPD and makes decisions and implements processes that reflect these.
e.
The CSPD vision, mission and purpose are aligned with the overall early intervention and preschool special education systems.
f.
The leadership team examines current policies and state initiatives (e.g. quality rating and improvement systems, educator effectiveness frameworks) to identify opportunities for collaboration and the coordination of resources, including ongoing and sustained funding across cross-sector early childhood systems.
g.
The leadership team advocates for and identifies resources for cross-sector priorities and activities.
h.
The leadership team disseminates information on the CSPD plan to relevant public and private audiences.
a.
The development and implementation of the CSPD plan is based on the specific vision, mission, and purpose for a CSPD.
b.
The CSPD plan is aligned with and informed by stakeholder input, national professional organization personnel standards, state requirements, and the vision, mission, and purpose of the cross-sector early childhood systems involved in the CSPD.
c.
The CSPD plan articulates a process for two way communication between stakeholders and the leadership team for soliciting input and sharing information on the implementation of activities.
d.
The CSPD plan includes strategies for engaging in ongoing formative evaluation and summative evaluation of the activities.
e.
The leadership team monitors both the implementation and effectiveness of the activities of the CSPD plan.
f.
The leadership team plans for and ensures that funding and resources are available to sustain the implementation of the CSPD plan.
a.
State personnel standards are based on core knowledge and skills needed for working with young children and their families in cross-sector early childhood systems.
b.
State personnel standards are specified, accessible, and used by program administrators and staff.
c.
State certification or licensing boards have a mechanism for assessing the degree to which state personnel standards are demonstrated by graduates of preservice programs across disciplines.
d.
State personnel standards are reviewed annually and updated, when appropriate, to reflect state personnel needs, changes in legal requirements, changes in national professional organizations personnel standards, evaluation data, and updated knowledge on evidence-based practices.
a.
A system for articulating and attaining a certification, licensure, credentialing and/or endorsement exists across disciplines.
b.
The criteria and requirements for attaining certification, licensure, credentialing and/or endorsement are specified and accessible for personnel across disciplines.
c.
The criteria and requirements for a system of certification, licensure, credential and/or endorsement are competency or skill based.
d.
Mechanisms such as inter-state agreements and policies are defined and exist for cross state reciprocity of certification, licensure, credential and/or endorsement.
e.
The system criteria and requirements are reviewed and updated, as appropriate to reflect state personnel needs, changes in legal requirements, changes in national professional organization personnel standards, evaluation data, and updated knowledge on evidence-based practices.
a.
IHE programs and curricula for each discipline are based on knowledge and skill competencies that are aligned with state personnel standards.
b.
IHE programs and curricula for each discipline are based on knowledge and skill competencies that are aligned with national professional organization personnel standards.
c.
IHE program competencies are operationalized and defined by example.
d.
IHE programs and curricula for each discipline are aligned with state and local program quality initiatives and evaluation systems (e.g., QRIS, educator effectiveness frameworks, licensing).
e.
IHE programs and curricula for each discipline are coordinated to ensure an adequate number of programs of study are available to meet current and future personnel needs.
a.
IHE programs and curricula across disciplines recruit and prepare personnel for professional roles and responsibilities.
b.
IHE programs and curricula across disciplines contain evidence-based practices that reflect the learning needs of children with and at-risk for developmental delays and disabilities and their families.
c.
IHE programs and curricula provide relevant field experiences such as internships, observations, and practica in a variety of inclusive early childhood settings.
d.
IHE programs and curricula are reviewed, evaluated, and updated to reflect current intervention evidence and revised state personnel standards and national professional organization personnel standards.
e.
IHE programs of study and curricula utilize evidence-based professional development practices and instructional methods to teach and supervise adult learners.
f.
IHE faculty collaborate and plan with inservice providers to align preservice and inservice personnel development so there is a continuum in the acquisition of content from knowledge to mastery.
a.
A statewide system for inservice personnel development is aligned to national professional organization personnel standards across disciplines.
b.
A statewide system for inservice personnel development is aligned to state personnel standards across disciplines.
c.
The statewide system for inservice personnel development provides a variety of technical assistance opportunities to meet the needs of personnel.
d.
The inservice personnel development component of the CSPD plan is guided by updated needs assessments of the capability of the workforce in relation to the desired knowledge and skill competencies.
e.
Inservice personnel development is coordinated across early childhood systems and delivered collaboratively, as appropriate.
f.
Inservice personnel development employs evidence-based professional development practices that incorporate a variety of adult learning strategies including job embedded applications such as coaching, reflective supervision and supportive mentoring.
g.
Inservice learning opportunities are individualized to the needs of the participants and the objectives of the personnel development.
h.
Families and/or parent organization participate in the design and delivery of inservice personnel development.
a.
The content for inservice personnel development is based on evidence-based practices.
b.
Faculty from IHEs and inservice staff meet on a quarterly basis to plan for, coordinate, and collaborate on inservice content.
c.
Content for inservice personnel development extends the depth of core knowledge and skills (CKCs) acquired in preservice programs and addresses updated knowledge on evidence-based practices and changes in state policies and initiatives.
a.
The content for inservice personnel development is based on evidence-based practices.
b.
Faculty from IHEs and inservice staff meet on a quarterly basis to plan for, coordinate, and collaborate on inservice content.
c.
Content for inservice personnel development extends the depth of core knowledge and skills (CKCs) acquired in preservice programs and addresses updated knowledge on evidence-based practices and changes in state policies and initiatives.
a.
Strategies include opportunities for advancement through a variety of processes such as articulation between two and four year institutions of higher education and access to career pathways/ladders.
b.
Strategies focus on induction, improving administrative supports, and using a variety of mentoring models to support and retain personnel.
c.
Strategies include incentives and recognition programs such as financial compensation, scholarships, service obligations, loan reimbursement and/or tuition reimbursement to improve access to preservice and inservice personnel development.
d.
Strategies address alternative routes to certification.
e.
Strategies address the usefulness of designing and/or participating in online recruitment systems.
a.
Decisions regarding priorities for evaluation questions to be addressed and data to be collected are identified when developing the CSPD plan.
b.
Multiple processes, mechanisms, and methods to collect data are identified and established based on the need for the information, usefulness of potential findings, and burden on respondents and systems.
c.
The state has the capacity to support data collection, management, and analysis for personnel qualifications, needs assessment, preservice and inservice personnel development, and personnel supply and demand.
d.
Quality review processes for data collection, verification, storage and management, and analysis are defined and implemented regularly.
e.
Personnel data are linked to child and family outcomes.
a.
The implementation of the evaluation plan results in data or data summaries and analysis that are useful for decision-making and are accessible across cross-sector early childhood systems.
b.
Data are used to inform decisions, monitor progress, and make program improvements.
c.
Data are collected on personnel variables, such as personnel development participation, acquisition of content, and performance of competencies and those data are examined in relation to relevant child and family outcomes.
d.
Data are collected on personnel development variables, such as units of personnel development, type and amount of support (e.g. observational feedback, coaching, practica), and content and those data are examined in relation to relevant child and family outcomes.
a.
Planning for accountability and improvement is aligned with the vision, mission and purpose of Part C or 619.
b.
An accountability and improvement plan is used to inform policy decisions and actions related to the accountability and ongoing improvement of the system.
c.
Stakeholders are engaged on an ongoing basis to inform development, implementation and revisions to the accountability and improvement plan.
d.
The accountability and improvement plan is readily available and accessible (e.g., other formats, languages) to the public.
e.
State leadership ensures that each element of the accountability and improvement plan is executed in a timely, efficient and effective manner.
f.
The accountability and improvement plan is aligned with and informed by other quality improvement initiatives within and across agencies.
g.
The accountability and improvement plan is reviewed and revised as necessary based on how well the plan monitors the implementation and effectiveness of the system.
a.
The goals of the accountability and improvement system are defined in the written accountability and improvement plan.
b.
The accountability and improvement plan includes mechanisms for implementing informal and formal dispute resolution procedures (e.g. administrative complaints, due process hearings, mediation) as needed as part of the accountability and improvement system.
c.
Expectations for systems performance (e.g. targets, benchmarks, indicators) are clearly identified and described in the accountability and improvement plan.
d.
The accountability and improvement plan includes performance measures to collect data that can be used to make data-informed decisions related to accountability and improvement.
e.
The accountability and improvement plan includes mechanisms for collecting valid and reliable data (e.g. record review, surveys, self-assessment, electronic child records) for accountability, program evaluation and quality improvement.
f.
The accountability and improvement plan includes processes and timelines for collection, analyses and making data-informed decisions based on performance data.
g.
The accountability and improvement plan addresses the use of data to measure performance and identify trends, root causes and improvement strategies at the state, regional and/or local levels of the system.
h.
An accountability and improvement plan includes processes that allow for necessary adjustments to strategies (e.g. professional development, incentives, sanctions) based on data to enhance accountability and improvement.
a.
Quantitative data and qualitative data collection methods are used to provide data to answer questions that measure progress toward the identified outcomes.
b.
Stakeholders are involved in the development of data collection tools or instruments as necessary.
c.
Data collection methods are designed to address what is needed to meet federal and state requirements.
d.
Data are collected to monitor the appropriateness of outcomes/goals, services, frequency, intensity and settings/environments.
e.
State Part C and 619 staff implement procedures to ensure data collected are verified and are of high quality (e.g. valid, reliable, accurate, timely).
f.
Data are collected on a regular basis and the type and amount collected is intentional based on priorities included in the accountability and improvement plan for accountability and improvement.
g.
Data collection methods measure fidelity of interventions and determine quality and/or the effectiveness of intervention approaches/strategies.
h.
Individuals collecting performance data possess required knowledge and competence in data collection and have access to ongoing support and training in this area.
i.
Selected data collection methods are coordinated across early care and education programs, are integrated with each other and do not duplicate effort.
j.
State Part C and 619 staff review and revise data collection methods as necessary to meet changing circumstances and ensure collection of needed data.
a.
Leaders at all levels analyze data quality (e.g. valid, reliable, accurate, timely) to make informed decisions for accountability and improvement.
b.
Leaders at all levels analyze and disaggregate data by programs/agencies, demographics and other variables to make conclusions about performance in relation to the targets.
c.
Data collected assist stakeholders and leaders at all levels in making data-informed decisions about how to enhance progress towards the intended results.
d.
Conclusions about local, regional and state performance are available for developing strategies that yield sustainable improvement.
a.
The state Part C and 619 systems have effective and efficient procedures in place to report data that adhere to applicable laws and regulations including timelines, content requirements, and privacy requirements.
b.
Performance data and desired messages (e.g. Annual Performance Report (APR), publicly reported data, legislative reports, monitoring reports, dispute resolution data) are accessible to relevant stakeholders using clear and concise reporting methods.
c.
Monitoring and dispute resolution reports communicating data-informed conclusions are issued to programs identifying regional and/or local performance, including findings of noncompliance and actions needed to make improvement and ensure correction.
d.
Leaders at all levels evaluate methods used to communicate data-based conclusions on an ongoing basis and revise as necessary.
a.
Part C and 619 state staff use data-informed decisions to target state resources and support (e.g. fiscal, human resources, technical assistance and professional development) for effective accountability and continuous improvement.
b.
Improvement planning processes incorporate evidence-based practices to achieve intended results.
c.
Part C and 619 state staff support continuous improvement by local educational agencies/early intervention service (LEAs/EIS) programs, through a variety of strategies (e.g. technical assistance, corrective action or improvement plans, IDEA determinations, sanctions) designed to meet federal and state requirements and move toward achieving the goals of the accountability and improvement plan.
d.
Leaders at all levels use data on fidelity of implementation to improve intervention practices.
e.
Continuous improvement activities are aligned with existing early childhood and education initiatives whenever appropriate.
f.
Part C and 619 state staff verify timely correction of noncompliance to support overall systems improvement leading to improved access and outcomes for children with disabilities.
g.
Strategies that are used to support improvement are reviewed and revised as necessary to ensure improvement occurs and is maintained.
a.
Technical assistance and/or professional development activities are targeted toward the knowledge and skills needed at the state and local level to use data-informed practices, including identifying and correcting noncompliance and improving results performance.
b.
Multiple professional development activities and supports (e.g. coaching, mentoring, training, peer to peer support) are aligned to enhance knowledge and skills related to using data to make program improvements.
c.
State and local leaders use mechanisms to track and inform improvement to practices and results over time.
d.
Technical assistance and professional development activities designed to enhance capacity at all levels are reviewed and revised as necessary.
a.
Child level standards emphasize significant, developmentally appropriate content and outcomes.
b.
Child level standards are aligned from birth through age five.
c.
Child level standards are age-anchored with specific precision to reflect that there are different expectations for children in each year of life.
d.
Child level standard content reflects the best available evidence on development and learning.
e.
Child level standards are appropriate for children from diverse cultural, linguistic and socio-economic backgrounds.
f.
Child level standards are aligned with standards for K-12.
g.
Child level standards are clear and understood by early care and education practitioners, local program administrators and families.
h.
Child level standards represent multiple areas of development and learning and reflect the content of nationally recognized early childhood outcomes frameworks, including the Office of Special Educaition Programs (OSEP) child outcomes and the Head Start child outcomes framework.
i.
Child level standards reflect universal design for learning (UDL), ensuring the standards are appropriate for young children with disabilities.
j.
Child level standards are reviewed and revised as necessary with input from stakeholders, including families of young children with disabilities, practitioners and representatives from Part C and 619 programs.
k.
Part C and Section 619 programs use the state child level standards (i.e., those used by other early childhood programs) to support the implementation of high-quality practices.
l.
State Part C and Section 619 programs have specified what children birth to 5 are expected to know and do, reflecting universal design, and programs use these standards.
m.
Child level standards developed by Part C and Section 619 are reviewed and revised as necessary with input from stakeholders, including families of young children with disabilities, practitioners and representatives from Part C and 619 programs.
n.
State Part C and Section 619 programs are involved with state efforts to develop child standards appropriate for all children.
a.
Child standards are widely disseminated and easily accessible to practitioners, families and the general public.
b.
Early care and education practitioners working with young children with disabilities are familiar with the child standards.
c.
Practices (e.g. assessment, Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)/Individualized Education Program (IEP) development, development and learning activities) reflect the child standards.
a.
Two and four year professional preparation programs address child level standards, including their use with children with disabilities.
b.
Ongoing professional development (e.g. mentoring, coaching) supports effective use of the child standards, including individualization for children with disabilities.
c.
Resources are available to support families in understanding and using the child standards to help their children develop and learn.
d.
The state has policies, procedures and/or guidance to support local programs in the alignment of curriculum and assessment with the child level standards.
e.
Evaluating program quality includes monitoring how well child standards are effectively used to guide practice, including individualization for children with disabilities.
a.
Program level standards are consistent with agreed upon program standards in the field (e.g., National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Program Standards, Head Start Performance Standards).
b.
Program level standards reflect the best available evidence on early childhood program quality and effectiveness.
c.
Program standards apply to the full range of programs in which young children with disabilities participate.
d.
Program level standards address a program's ability to support the needs of a diverse population of children.
e.
Program level standards address program's responsibilities to build on families' strengths to support them in caring for their children and in encouraging them to serve in leadership roles.
f.
Program level standards are clear and understood by practitioners, local program administrators and families.
g.
Program level standards are widely disseminated and easily accessible to practitioners, families and the general public.
h.
Early childhood programs, including Part C and Section 619, use program level standards to drive program improvement.
i.
Program level standards are reviewed and revised as necessary with input from stakeholders, including families of young children with disabilities, practitioners and representatives from Part C and 619 programs.
a.
The EI/ECSE standards address federal and state legal requirements.
b.
The EI/ECSE standards reflect the best available evidence on early childhood program quality and effectiveness.
c.
The EI/ECSE standards address the qualifications of practitioners providing services to young children with disabilities and their families.
d.
The EI/ECSE standards are consistent with professional practice guidance in the field (e.g., DEC Recommended Practices, American Speech and Hearing Association Practice Policies).
e.
The EI/ECSE standards are coordinated and consistent with other early care and education programs across the state.
f.
The EI/ECSE standards are widely disseminated and easily accessible to practitioners, families and the general public.
g.
The EI/ECSE standards address program's responsibilities to build on families' strengths to support them in caring for their children and in encouraging them to serve in leadership roles.
h.
Part C and Section 619 programs use the standards to drive program improvement.
i.
The EI/ECSE standards are reviewed and revised as necessary with input from a diverse group of stakeholders, including families of young children with disabilities, practitioners and representatives from Part C and 619 programs.
a.
The infrastructure includes adequate fiscal and human resources for the development, implementation and monitoring of program standards.
b.
Two and four year professional preparation programs address the application of program level standards to the full range of early care and education programs.
c.
Ongoing professional development (e.g. mentoring, coaching) supports effective application of program level standards to the full range of early care and education programs.
d.
The state has a process to use the program standards as part of monitoring and program improvement.
e.
The extent to which each program has achieved the program standards is easily accessible to practitioners, families and the general public (e.g. State Performance Plan (SPP), Annual Performance Reports (APR), SPP/APR public reporting, quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS)).
f.
Resources are available to support families in understanding the extent to which each program has achieved the standards in order to help them make informed decisions.
g.
The state evaluates the effectiveness of the infrastructure that supports the use of the program standards.

Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center

  • CB 8040
  • Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040
  • phone: 919.962.2001
  • fax: 919.966.7463
  • email: ectacenter@unc.edu

The ECTA Center is a program of the FPG Child Development Institute of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, funded through cooperative agreement number H326P120002 from the Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent the Department of Education's position or policy.

  • FPG Child Development Institute
  • IDEAs that Work