The 2012 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference
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Presentations

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Saturday | Sunday

Saturday, October 27, 2012

7:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Continental Breakfast and Exhibits

Table Top Discussions and Breakfast

Please join us in the plenary room for informal discussions with colleagues while enjoying your morning coffee, tea, and breakfast. Facilitators will be available at each table. Please see handout for the discussion topic list. Breakfast available 7:30-9:00; Discussions 7:45-8:45.


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9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Welcome and Opening Address

ECO Plenary


Welcome and Overview to the Conference


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11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Concurrent Sessions

The Child and Family Outcomes Measurement Frameworks

Developed by the ECO Center and several partner states, the measurement frameworks provide a structure, including quality indicators, for a high quality state level measurement system that includes collecting valid data and using the information for program improvement at the local level. The frameworks and the corresponding self-assessments will be described along with various ways states can use them to plan and improve how they are measuring child and family outcomes. This session is targeted to those who are not familiar with the frameworks but all are welcome to join us for a discussion about how states can use the frameworks and the self-assessments.


Child Functioning in Routines as Information for Child Outcomes Reporting

To help make the data going into child outcomes reporting meaningful, teams should consider the child's functional participation in everyday routines. The Measure of Engagement, Independence, and Social Relationships in Routines (MEISR) is a tool for rating functional behaviors commonly seen in the home routines of infants and toddlers. Family members complete the scale with items cross-referenced by the three federal child outcomes as well as the five domains required for the IFSP. The MEISR can also be used to age anchor children's functional skills discovered through authentic assessment. Whether used as a quantitative source of data or in a qualitative way to discuss OSEP outcomes, the MEISR could help ensure that outcomes reporting is related to meaningful participation.


Helping Local Programs Improve Outcomes Performance Using the DAC Data Analysis Framework

How can states support the use of outcomes data at the local level to promote program improvement? In this session, two states will share how they implemented the Data Accountability Center (DAC) Analysis Framework to support local programs in analyzing data and using data for program improvement. The NC Part C program will share their work that focuses on ensuring that families know their rights. Minnesota will share information about their 0-5 initiative that looks at both child and family outcomes and also looks more broadly across early childhood programs.


Taking the Plunge: First Steps to Integrating Child Outcomes into the IFSP/IEP Process

Integrating the child outcomes into the IFSP or IEP process is a trend fast gaining in popularity and use in many Part C and 619 programs. Combining the processes has been found to lead to improved data collection, streamlined and efficient paperwork, and more effective individualized child and family service planning. In this session, we'll explore how states can start thinking about integrating the outcomes into the IFSP or IEP process. Using the first two stages of implementation science (exploration and installation) as a framework, three states will share their approaches to “getting started” with an integrated process.


The Role of QRIS in Improving Quality for Preschool Children with IEPs

Presenters from DE and NC will discuss the benefits and potential of 619 engagement in state Quality Rating Improvement System (QRIS) development and use. Speakers will present considerations specifically related to making QRIS work for programs which include children with disabilities, such as strategies for measurement, incentives for involvement, licensing and monitoring, and others.


Training and TA on Child Outcomes Measurement: Beyond the Face-to-Face!

Panelists will discuss how their training and TA delivery has evolved over the past decade to address outcomes measurements as well as program improvement. The panel will describe how training on child outcomes fits with the bigger professional development system in their states, as well as strategies they use to make sure it meets its mark in terms of audience and learning objectives.


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2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Plenary

Applying 'Moneyball' to Your Life and Work: What's your World Series and OBP?


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3:45 PM - 5:15 PM

Concurrent Sessions

Follow up to the Plenary: Discussion with Greg Meyer

This session will give participants an opportunity to talk informally with Greg Meyer about the principles and themes discussed in the plenary session.


Data Drill Down: Supporting Local Programs in Realizing the Possibilities for Using Data

How can local programs implement a process for drilling down into their data to ensure data quality and program quality? In this session, Kansas will share their Data Drilldown Guide and training developed for supporting local programs in looking at child outcomes data and planning for improvement. ECO will share a national resource with suggested drill down questions developed for child outcomes (C3/B7) and family outcomes (C4).


Knowing What They Know: Procedures for Verifying the Skills of our Data Reporters

Obtaining high quality data on child outcomes requires that providers be skilled in the state’s measurement process. Colorado uses the Teaching Strategies GOLD assessment which includes a process for verifying assessor knowledge through an interrater reliability test and certification process. Maryland is developing a training module for the Child Outcome Summary (COS) which will include an assessment of provider knowledge. These states will talk about their experiences planning and implementing procedures for verifying provider knowledge of the measurement process. The ECO Center also will report on progress toward developing a certification process for the COS.


Linking Practices to Promote Social, Language, and Literacy Development

The Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI) and the Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL), funded by the OSEP, are engaged in a project to build the capacity of preschool teachers to implement evidence-based social-emotional and early literacy practices during the same activity. They have created a web-based app that allows preschool teachers to find materials and ideas for promoting children's social competence and early literacy skills that match the needs of their children and the activities in their classrooms. This presentation will describe and demonstrate how the app is used and present the social validity data gathered from preschool teachers who used the materials for a month.


Provider Perceptions of the COS Process

Come learn about findings from ENHANCE, a project studying how well the Child Outcomes Summary (COS) process produces meaningful data. Results from a survey of providers (N=850) will be described, including questions about training experiences, provider knowledge, COS process approaches, perceived accuracy, and impact of the COS process on practice. Come discuss the meaning of these findings with your colleagues and consider use of surveys in state evaluation or quality assurance activities. To learn about other ENHANCE work, see our posters at the reception describing findings from the comparison with child assessments study and the state data study. A tabletop discussion on Sunday morning is focused on defining a quality COS process and will include information from the ENHANCE video study.


What Does CEDS (the Common Education Data Standards) Have To Do With Us?

So why should Part C and Section 619 programs pay attention to Common Education Data Standards (CEDS)? The presenters will provide an overview of the Common Education Data Standards, demonstrate the tools available to state users, and describe how Delaware is using CEDS in the development of their integrated EC data system.


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Sunday, October 28, 2012

7:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Continental Breakfast and Exhibits

Table Top Discussions and Breakfast

Please join us in the plenary room for informal discussions with colleagues while enjoying your morning coffee, tea, and breakfast. Facilitators will be available at each table. Please see handout for the discussion topic list. Breakfast available 7:30-9:00; Discussions 7:45-8:45.


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9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Plenary

Development and Dual Language Learners: What are Appropriate Outcomes?


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11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Concurrent Sessions

Follow up to the Plenary: Discussion with Linda Espinosa

This session will give participants an opportunity to talk informally with Linda Espinosa about the resources and information discussed in the plenary session related to quality policies and practices for serving young children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.


Creating a Culture of Using Data at the Local Level

In this session, Alaska Part C will describe their use of statewide analysis of patterns in their child outcomes data collected using the Child Outcomes Summary Form. They will also describe the process of building the capacity of their local programs to understand and use data.


Current Developments: Integrated/Coordinated Early Childhood Longitudinal Data Systems

Can EC longitudinal data systems provide information to guide Part C and Section 619 program and policy improvements? Presenters will facilitate discussion of strategies for developing useful cross agency EC data systems. In addition, OSEP will introduce the newly funded State EC Longitudinal Data System TA Center.


Inquiring Families Want to Know: Engaging Families in the Outcomes Rating Process

The Child Outcomes Summary (COS) process is designed to be a team process, which includes the family of the child with a disability. Talking with and informing families about all the aspects of the early intervention and/or early childhood special education process is a marker of quality, and is absolutely essential for both individual child planning and accurate child outcomes measurement. In this session, the presenters will begin with a discussion about why the conversations with families are so critical. Four states will then share their professional development methods designed to enhance both providers’ and families’ understanding of the COS process and their capacity to participate fully in rating discussions.


Understanding Child Development is Key to Quality Child Outcomes Measurement and to Planning Services

How can states support local programs in understanding typical child development? In this session, presenters will share how key resources-presentations, videos, early learning guidelines, milestones documents, and training activities-can be used to help practitioners understand child development and functional outcomes for young children birth through five years. We encourage you to be prepared to share resources you may have as well in this interactive session.


Using Digital Video to Enhance Authentic Assessment Practices and Improve Results for Young Children

This session will share lessons learned by two statewide efforts that support early care and education providers’ use of digital video to enhance authentic assessment practices and improve results for young children. The Results Matter Video Project, a part of the Colorado Department of Education's Office of Early Learning and the Desired Results access Project Video Initiative, funded by the California Department of Education's Special Education Division, will describe their respective projects and show clips that illustrate how video is being used in the two states.


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12:30 PM

Meeting Adjourns

Meeting Adjourns


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