Improving Systems, Practices and Outcomes

Selected Bibliography of Articles and Books
on Assistive Technology

AT - General

AT - Infants, Toddlers, and Young Children

  • Campbel, P., Milbourne, S., Dugan, L., & Wilcox, M. (2006). A review of evidence on practices for teaching young children to use assistive technology devices. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 26(1), 3-13.
  • Campbell, P., Milbourne, S., & Wilcox, M. (2008). Adaptation interventions to promote participation in natural settings. Infants and Young Children, 21(2), 94-106.
  • DesJardin, J., Eisenberg, L., & Hodapp, R. (2006). Sound beginnings: Supporting families of young deaf children with cochlear implants. Infants & Young Children, 19(3), 179-189.
  • Dugan, L., Campbell, P., & Wilcox, M. (2006). Making decisions about assistive technology with infants and toddlers. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 26(1), 25-32.
  • Dunst, C. J., & Trivette, C. M. (2011). PDF: Evidence-Based strategies for training adults to use assistive technology and adaptations, Research Brief, 5(1). Tots 'n Tech Research Institute.
  • Hutinger, P. L., Bell, C., & Daytner, G. (2006). Establishing and maintaining an early childhood emergent literacy technology curriculum. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(4), 39-54.
  • Judge, S. (2006). Constructing an assistive technology toolkit for young children: Views from the field. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(4), 17-24.
  • Lane, S. J. & Mistrett, S. (2002). Let's play! Assistive technology interventions for play. Young Exceptional Children; v5 n2 p19-27.
  • Lesar, S. (1998). Use of assistive technology with young children with disabilities: Current status and training needs. Journal of Early Intervention. v21 n2 p146-59.
  • Long, T., Huang, L., Woodbridge, M., Woolverton, M., & Minkel, J. (2003). Integrating assistive technology into an outcome-driven model of service delivery. Infants & Young Children, 16(4), 272-283.
  • Mintz, Barbara. (1998). Young children with AAC needs. Bangor, ME: University of Maine Center for Community Inclusion.
  • Moore, H., & Wilcox, M. (2006). Characteristics of early intervention practitioners and their confidence in the use of assistive technology. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 26(1), 15-23.
  • Mistrett, S., Ruffino, A., Lane, S., Robinson, L., Reed, P., & Milbourne, S. (2006). PDF: Supports for young children: TAM technology FAN. Buffalo, NY: University at Buffalo, Let's Play! Project
  • National Center for Technology Innovation & Center for Implementing Technology in Education. (2006). WWW: Help for young learners: How to choose AT?. Authors.
  • PACER Center (2014). Technology can help young children suceed (ACTion Sheet: PHP-c70). Author.
  • PACER Center and Tots 'n Tech Research Institute. (2011). PDF: EZ AT 2: Simple assistive technology ideas for children ages birth to three. Minneapolis, MN: PACER Center.
  • Pierce, P. (ed.) (n.d.). WWW: Baby power: A guide for families for using assistive technology with their infants and toddlers. Chapel Hill, NC: The Center for Literacy and Disabilities Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
  • Sadao, K., Robinson, N., & Grant-Cooper, D. (2007). It's All About access: Getting the word out about assistive technology in early intervention. Closing the Gap, 25(6), 1, 9-11.
  • Stremel, K. (2005). DEC Recommended Practices: Technology applications. In Sandall, S., Hemmeter, M. L., Smith, B. J., & McLean, N. (Eds.), DEC recommended practices: a comprehensive guide for practical application in early intervention/early childhood special education (pp.147-162). Longmont, CC: Sopris West.
  • Technical Assistance ALLIANCE for Parent Centers. (2006). PDF: Assistive technology for infants, toddlers, and young children with disabilities. Minneapolis, MN: PACER Center.
  • Weintraub, H., & Wilcox, M. (2006). AT and young children: Confidence, experience, and education of early intervention providers. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 26(1), 15-24.
  • Wilcox, M., Dugan, L. M., & Campbell, P. H. (2006). Recommended practices and parent perspectives regarding AT use in early intervention. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(4), 7-16.
  • Wilcox, M., Guimond, A., Campbell, P., & Moore, H. (2006). Provider perspectives on the use of assistive technology for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 26(1), 33-49.
  • Wilcox, M., Norman-Murch, T., Oberstein, J. S., Volkmann, M. A., Wagner, D. K., Musselwhite, C. R., Malena, E. (1999). PDF: Assistive technology and early childhood education.Tempe, AZ: Arizona State University.
  • Wissick, C. A., & Schweder, W. (2006). Assistive technology centers: Getting technology into the hands of users. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(4), 55-7.

AT and Family Involvement / Diversity Issues

  • Hider, E. D. (2000). A qualitative study of the child, family and professional factors that influence the use of assistive technology in early intervention. (ED439872). In: Capitalizing on Leadership in Rural Special Education: Making a Difference for Children and Families. Conference Proceedings (Alexandria, VA, March 16-18, 2000).
  • Judge, S. L. & Parette, H. P. (1998). Assistive technology for young children with disabilities: A guide to family-centered services. Cambridge, MA: Brookline Books.
  • Parette, H. P., & Brotherson, M. J. (2004). Family-centered and culturally responsive assistive technology decision making. Infants & Young Children, 17(4), 355-367.
  • Parette, H. P. & Hourcade, J. J. (1997). Family issues and assistive technology needs: A sampling of state practices. Journal of Special Education Technology; v13 n3 p27-43.
  • Parette, P. & McMahan, G. A. (2002). What should we expect of assistive technology: Being sensitive to family goals. Teaching Exceptional Children. v23, n1 (Sept./Oct 2002): 56-61. For more information go to: WWW: http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/eric/osep/newsbriefs/news32.html
  • Parette, H. P., & Petch-Hogan, B. (2000). Approaching families: Facilitating culturally/linguistically diverse family involvement. Exceptional Children, 33(2), 4-10.
  • Parette, H. P., VanBiervliet, A. & Hourcade, J. J. (2000 ). Family-Centered decision making in assistive technology. Journal of Special Education Technology, 15(1), 45-55.
  • Sawyer, B., Milbourne, S., Dugan, L., & Campbell, P. (2005). PDF: Report of assistive technology training for providers and families of children in early intervention.Research Brief, 1(6). Tots n Tech Research Institute.
  • Wilcox, M., Dugan, L. M., & Campbell, P. H. (2006). Recommended practices and parent perspectives regarding AT use in early intervention. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(4), 7-16.

AT and Funding Issues

AT and IEP/IFSP Development

  • Chambers, A. C. (1997). Has technology been considered? A guide for IEP Teams. Reston, VA.: Council of Administrators of Special Education and Technology and Media Division of Council for Exceptional Children.
  • Lahm, E. A., Bell, J. K. & Blackhurst, A. E. (2000). WWW: University of Kentucky Assistive Technology Project's toolkit. Lexington, KY: University of Kentucky Assistive Technology Project.
  • Parette, H. P. & Murdick, N. L.(1998). Assistive technology and IEPs for young children with disabilities. Early Childhood Education Journal, 25(3), 193-98.
  • Vermont Family Network. (2009). PDF: Assistive technology and the IEP. Williston, VT: Author.

AT and Inclusion

  • Center on Technology and Disability. (2012). WWW: Inclusion and AT: "Universal access to the curriculum will change everything."
  • Campbell, P., Milbourne, S., & Wilcox, M. (2008). Adaptation interventions to promote participation in natural settings. Infants and Young Children, 21(2), 94-106.
  • Dinnebeil, Laurie A.; Boat, Mary; Bae, Youlmi. (2013). Integrating principles of universal design into the early childhood curriculum. Dimensions of Early Childhood, 41(1).
  • Gould, P., & J. Sullivan (1999). The inclusive early childhood classroom: Easy ways to adapt learning centers for all children. Beltsville, MD: Gryphon House, Inc.
  • Harte, H. A. (2010). The Project Approach: A strategy for inclusive classrooms. Young Exceptional Children, 13(3), 15-27.
  • Johnston, S. S., McDonnell, A. P., Nelson, C., & Magnavito, A. (2003). Teaching functional communication skills using augmentative and alternative communication in inclusive settings. Journal of Early Intervention, 25(4).
  • Maushak, N. J., Kelley, P. & Blodgett, T. (2001). Preparing teachers for the inclusive classroom: a preliminary study of attitudes and knowledge of assistive technology. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 9(3), 419-431.
  • Parette, H.P., & Blum, C. (January/February 2014). Using flexible participation in technology-supported universally designed preschool activities Teaching Exceptional Children, 46: 60-67.
  • Sax, C., Pupian, I., & Fisher, D. (2003). Assistive technology and inclusion. Interwork Institute, San Diego State University Consortium on Inclusive Schooling Practices.
  • Sheldon, K. (1996). Early childhood special education. "Can I play too?" Adapting common classroom activities for young children with limited motor abilities. Early Childhood Education Journal, 24(2), 115-120.

AT Policy

For examples of state assistive technology policies and guidance documents, see our State AT Contacts and Guidance Documents page.

AT and Quality Assurance

Search the Professional Literature

For additional citations and abstracts of materials related to the use of assistive technology with infants, toddlers and young children, search the professional literature. The following descriptors will help you with your search:

  • "Assistive Technology"
  • "Early Childhood Education"
  • "Early Intervention"
  • Infants
  • Toddlers
  • "Preschool Education"

Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center

  • CB 8040
  • Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040
  • phone: 919.962.2001
  • fax: 919.966.7463
  • email: ectacenter@unc.edu

The ECTA Center is a program of the FPG Child Development Institute of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, funded through cooperative agreement number H326P120002 from the Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent the Department of Education's position or policy.

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