Improving Systems, Practices and Outcomes

Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)

eNotes search results for 'Every Student Succeeds Act or ESSA'. Please note that links in past issues of eNotes may become inactive over time. If you are looking for an item that has an inactive link, please contact Sonya Detwiler for assistance.

1. Hurricane Help

Source: U.S. Department of Education

The U.S. Dept. of Education is working with other federal agencies, such as FEMA and DHS, to ensure continuation of critical services to students, families, and educators and the restoration of the learning environment. The Disaster Distress Helpline is below, and additional hurricane resources can be found here.

2. Early Childhood Workforce Text4Teachers

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services

Text4Teachers supports Head Start and Early Head Start teachers, staff members, and others who care for and teach young children in center-based and family child care settings. You can sign up to receive two free text messages per month with information, tips, research, and resources to strengthen and support your teaching practices. Text4Teachers will also share messages about key events and professional development (PD) opportunities. To sign up, text ECDTL to 22660, and you will have access to the newest resources as soon as they are released. Text4Teachers is also available in Spanish.

3. Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Update

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO)

As an informational service to early learning policymakers, agencies and practitioners, CEELO reviews department of education websites for all 50 states for new information related to ESSA state plans and implementation and provides monthly updates. This update (August 2017) describes CEELO's findings from a scan of 16 completed state ESSA plans as of April 2017 with a focus on how states are addressing early childhood education needs. It is noted that Delaware is the only state that makes high quality early childhood education its long-term goal. Also, Oregon describes its policies as part of a preK-12 continuum, including transition strategies for birth to preschool and preschool to kindergarten.

4. FY 2017 REOPENING Notice Inviting Applications (NIA) -- Personnel Development to Improve Services for Children with Disabilities

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP)

On August 11, 2017, OSEP published its reopened NIA in the Federal Register to allow applicants to submit or resubmit applications that meet the requirements to ensure that State Part C and Part B, section 619 programs receive the technical assistance necessary to implement high-quality comprehensive systems of personnel development. This notice reopens the competition until September 11, 2017.

The application package for the competition is now posted on the Department's website, and also on Grants.gov. The contact person is Tracie Dickson.

5. Health Insurance: A Critical Support for Infants, Toddlers, and their Families

Source: CLASP and ZERO TO THREE

This brief (2017) from CLASP and ZERO TO THREE focuses on the essential policies necessary to support infants, toddlers, and their families. Based on growing evidence, "children enrolled in Medicaid in their early years not only do better in childhood than children without health insurance, but also have better health, educational, and employment outcomes in adulthood." Research further "demonstrates that Medicaid coverage improves access to care and overall health and reduces mortality rates."

6. Building Early Childhood Education into ESSA School Improvement Plans

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) and New America

In blog #10 of the Early Ed in ESSA: Helping Every Child Succeed blog series (June 2017), CEELO and New America offer states practical tips for embedding early learning in their ESSA plans. A few examples are below:

  • Incorporate early childhood instructional indicators in accountability systems.
  • Embed the state's priorities into the 7 percent set-aside for school improvement activities and the 3 percent set-aside for Direct Student Services.
  • Incorporate early childhood indicators into school report cards.

7. Early Childhood Special Education and ESSA: A Great Opportunity for All

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) and New America

According to the latest Early Ed in ESSA: Helping Every Child Succeed blog (July 2017), DaSy and ECTA, both national technical assistance centers, encourage states to make the inclusion of children with disabilities a priority, as part of their efforts to improve early learning programs. "Planning for the inclusion of young children with disabilities in new or expanded early learning programs offers local education agencies the additional benefit of supporting their efforts under IDEA."

8. Technical Changes to IDEA - Final Regulations Released

Source: U.S. Department of Education

Today, the U.S. Department of Education released Final Regulations (effective June 30, 2017) under Parts B and C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The final regulations make technical revisions required to implement statutory amendments made to the IDEA by the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). When ESSA reauthorized ESEA on December 10, 2015, the new law changed sections 602 and 611-614 of the IDEA. As a result, the IDEA regulations were amended in Parts 300 and 303 to reflect the conforming changes. See the amendments summary here.

9. Leading the Way: How States are Addressing Early Learning Under ESSA

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) and New America

According to this blog entry from the blog series Early Ed in ESSA: Helping Every Child Succeed (June 2017), CEELO together with the Regional Education Laboratory-Southwest sponsored a webinar recently highlighting important strategies that early education administrators can use to ensure early learning is integrated throughout the ESSA plan. Some of the strategies include using a birth to third grade system framework, creating an evidence-based early learning footprint in the state plan, and building alliances to engage all stakeholders for aligning priorities and resources.

10. School Improvement Starts Before School: Under ESSA, States Can Start Re-Orienting Districts Towards the Early Years (Early Ed in ESSA: Helping Every Child Succeed - Blog Series)

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes and New America

According to a recent entry from the blog series Early Ed in ESSA: Helping Every Child Succeed (May 2017), K-2 years have historically been ignored in state accountability systems. ESSA gives states new flexibility to focus dollars on early learning, and this means new approaches for measuring accountability and school improvement systems, and addressing different needs for K-2. These additional resources are provided at the end of the article:

11. Early Ed in ESSA: Helping Every Child Succeed - Blog Series

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes and New America - April 25, 2017

A new blog series, Early Ed in ESSA: Helping Every Child Succeed, will highlight early learning opportunities and challenges under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The blogs will be authored by early childhood education scholars and researchers exploring key issues raised by ESSA and its implementation. Blog #1 - What's the Right Thing to Do for Every Child to Succeed? (April 25, 2017) discusses strategies that can help reduce the achievement gap and avoid more costly interventions in later grades. The series is an initiative of the Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) and New America.

12. National Center on Improving Literacy (NCIL) Launches Website.

Source: U.S. Department of Education - March 21. 2017

The new National Center on Improving Literacy recently launched its website. NCIL will provide technical assistance services to families to improve literacy outcomes for children in pre-K through grade 12 with, or at risk for, literacy-related disabilities, including dyslexia. Family-focused activities will include a repository of evidence-based products and assessments; the online Kids Zone, which facilitates effective child-adult interactions for literacy development; the Ask-an-Expert tool; and a text messaging plug-in to receive text messages alerting users to new resources, events, or literacy tips. NCIL is jointly administered by the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services and the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education.

13. Unlocking ESSA's Potential to Support Early Learning

Source: New America and the BUILD Initiative - March 2, 2017

In December 2015, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act was reauthorized by Congress as the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA, P.L. 114-95) and states are currently in the process of preparing to submit their ESSA plans for approval. A new paper, Unlocking ESSA's Potential to Support Early Learning (March 2017), provides an introduction to the ESSA and explores major provisions that expand early learning opportunities, bring new attention to children's earliest years, and have implications for the early learning system.

14. ESSA and the Use of Assistive and Instructional technology

Source: Center on Technology and Disability - February 14, 2017

The Center on Technology and Disability has published the following resources showing how the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) supports the effective use of assistive and instructional technology to enhance teaching and learning.

15. State Pre-K Funding 2016-17 Fiscal Year: Trends and Opportunities

Source: Education Commission of the States - January 30, 2017

A new 50-state review, State Pre-K Funding 2016-17 Fiscal Year: Trends and Opportunities (January 2017), looks at state investments in pre-K funding by program for the 2016-17 fiscal year (FY). It finds that 2016-17 state pre-K funding increased $480 million or 6.8% over 2015-16. The review highlights a number of state examples and describes early learning opportunities for states under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

16. Supporting Early Education in State ESSA Plans - Updated State Scan

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes - January 27, 2017

Since the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) was signed into law on December 10, 2015, states have been making plans for a smooth transition into full implementation, scheduled for 2017. The Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) recently reviewed the State Department of Education websites of all states and posted an updated version of their Every Student Succeeds Act and Opportunities to Prioritize Early Learning Policy: State Scan (updated January 2017). This resource was developed to assist the field in identifying opportunities and best practices to support the elevation of early learning in ESSA state plans. It includes:

  • Links to state pages devoted to ESSA information
  • State timelines for the development of state plans
  • Examples of early childhood engagement in state plans
  • Links to state plans that have been posted publicly
  • Links to information about strategies states are using to gather public input and engage stakeholders

For this and other relevant resources, visit the ESSA page on the CEELO website.

17. Final ESSA Regulations on Accountability, State Plans and Data Reporting

Source: U.S. Department of Education - November 28, 2016

The final regulations to implement the accountability, data reporting, and state plan provisions of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) were released on November 28, 2016. Highlights of key changes made in response to direct feedback from public comments can be found in the press release from the U.S. Department of Education. These regulations are effective January 30, 2017.

18. Aligning Early Childhood Programs To Serve Children Experiencing Homelessness

Source: National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth - October 2016

A new resource, Aligning Early Childhood Programs To Serve Children Experiencing Homelessness (2016), compares preschool, Head Start, and child care policies for children experiencing homelessness. It can be used to help educators, service providers, and advocates understand changes due to the Every Student Succeeds Act, new Head Start Program Performance Standards, and new child care regulations.

19. Federal Guidance - Supporting Early Learning through the ESSA

Source: U.S. Department of Education - October 20, 2016

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) includes provisions to: promote coordination in early learning among local communities; align preschool with early elementary school; and build the capacity of teachers, leaders and others serving young children to provide high-quality early learning opportunities. The ESSA also authorizes Preschool Development Grants to ensure that more children have access to high-quality preschool. New Non-Regulatory Guidance from the U.S. Department of Education has been released to:

  • remind state and local decision-makers about the importance of investing in early learning;
  • highlight the opportunities available under the new law to strengthen early education; and
  • provide examples of how states and local communities can support young children's success in school.

This and additional guidance related to the ESSA can be found at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/index.html

20. Early Childhood Expulsion / Suspension and Opportunity Gaps for Boys of Color

Source: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Child Care Aware - October 14, 2016

Two recently published briefs examine issues related to early childhood expulsion and suspension, as well as barriers to accessing quality early childhood education for young boys of color in the U.S.

These two briefs are part of a series of issue briefs commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Forward Promise Initiative.

21. Two Reports Highlight Early Childhood Opportunities in the ESSA

Source: National Association of State Boards of Education and Mid-Atlantic Comprehensive Center at WestEd - October 10, 2016

Two new reports highlight opportunities for supporting and improving access to high quality early childhood education in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

22. Federal Guidance: Building Systems of Support for Excellent Teaching and Leading

Source: U.S. Department of Education - September 27, 2016

New Non-Regulatory Guidance provides recommendations to support, recruit and retain high quality teachers through the use of funding from Title II, Part A of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), as well as other funding sources. This guidance highlights some key areas Title II, Part A funds can be used to support the workforce through better preparation, mentorship and induction, increased diversity, and bolstering teacher leadership. Strategies for using Title II, Part A funds to support the professional development of early educators can be found on page 24. This and additional guidance related to the ESSA can be found at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/index.html

23. Federal Guidance - English Language Learners

Source: U.S. Department of Education - September 23, 2016

Non-Regulatory Guidance has been released to help States, school districts, and schools provide effective services that improve the English language proficiency and academic achievement of English language learners through Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The ESSA promotes the inclusion of English language learners as young as age 3 in early learning programs as part of Title III (see the relevant statutory provisions on pages 31-34). This and additional guidance related to the ESSA can be found at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/index.html

24. Video - Being Amy's Sister: On Having a Sibling with a Disability

Source: JFK Partners, University of Colorado School of Medicine - August 29, 2016

JFK Partners' ENRICH Early Intervention Reunion Videos features families who received early intervention services as long as 20 years ago. Being Amy's Sister: On Having a Sibling with a Disability (Runtime: 13:42) is a new addition to the series. In this video Meg Bost describes her experiences growing up as a twin with a sister with disabilities. The video includes important messages for family members of children with disabilities, especially sisters and brothers, as well as providers who offer support for families. It is a companion to the video A Reunion with Amy.

25. New Guidance on Education for Homeless Children Released

Source: U.S. Department of Education - July 27, 2016

New guidance is available to assist state and local partners in implementing the provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) for supporting homeless children and youth, including preschool-aged homeless children. The guidance clarifies requirements of Title VII-B of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, which was re-authorized in December 2015 by the ESSA. The McKinney-Vento Act includes, among other things, new or changed requirements focused on preschool-aged homeless children, including clarification that local liaisons must ensure that these children and their families have access to and receive services, if eligible, under preschool programs administered by the local education agency (LEA), including Head Start, Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities), and other LEA-administered preschool programs.

The new guidance is part of a series of guidance documents that is being released related to new provisions in the ESSA.

26. Guidance on the Every Student Succeeds Act - Children in Foster Care / Engaging Stakeholders

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - June 23, 2016

The U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services have released guidance to states, school districts and child welfare agencies on new provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) for supporting children in foster care. The U.S. Education of Department also has released a letter stressing the importance of meaningful stakeholder engagement as states and local school districts transition to the ESSA.

Additional guidance related to the ESSA is available at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/index.html.

27. Follow-up Video - Getty's Door to Inclusion

Source: Desired Results Access Project - May 9, 2016

Last year the Desired Results Access Project produced a video entitled "Getty's Window To Inclusion: The Chance To Be Just Like Any Other Kid," which showed how Getty, a young girl who cannot physically be near other children because of health issues, was able to virtually participate in preschool. A new, follow-up video has just been released.

  • Getty's Door to Inclusion shows Getty virtually attending a typical kindergarten classroom. It illustrates the importance of having consistent and high expectations for all children, sound communication strategies, and effective parent-teacher collaboration. It provides important messages for all those interested in early childhood and elementary school inclusion, for all current and future early childhood educators, and for families who are looking for solutions for their children who cannot attend school due to health issues.

Both videos are available in the Desired Results Access Project Video Library (at the top of the page, select the "General Interest" tab). As with all Desired Results videos, they can be viewed online or downloaded at no cost for use in educational and professional development activities.

28. Video Series on the Use of Technology with Evidence Based Early Intervention

Source: Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council - April 26, 2016

A new video series about the use of technology with evidence based early intervention illustrates how video, video conferencing, and related technologies can improve access to and the quality of supports for families, as well as better enable teams to practice evidence-based early intervention services. The videos can be viewed at http://ddc.ohio.gov/video-ei-series. It is suggested that you watch them in order:

  1. An Overview of Using Technology to Support Families in Early Intervention
  2. Using Video to Enhance Play, Communication, and Relationships
  3. Using Instant Messaging and Video for Just-In-Time Support
  4. Using Video and Video Conferencing to Enable Team Meetings over Distances
  5. Using Facetime to Enhance Team Collaboration
  6. A Virtual Home Visit with Liam's Family
  7. A Virtual Co-Visit with Straton's Family
  8. Using Video as a Foundation for Reflective Supervision

The series was produced collaboratively by the Ohio Association of County Boards of Developmental Disabilities, a grantee of the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council, the Bridging the Gaps in Ohio Part C Service Delivery Project, the BHN Alliance (Belmont, Harrison, and Noble County Boards of Developmental Disabilities), videographer Larry Edelman, and most importantly, families and early intervention practitioners in Ohio.

29. Input Requested on ESSA Guidance - Including Ways to Expand Early Learning

Source: U.S. Department of Education - April 26, 2016

The U.S. Department of Education is seeking input on areas of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) on which to provide non-regulatory guidance. Non-regulatory guidance is not binding and does not impose any new requirements beyond those in the law and regulations. It is intended to provide clarification and examples of best practices. One specific area the Department would like input on is ways to expand early learning - strategies to recruit, develop, and retain teachers and leaders. You can send suggestions to ESSA.guidance@ed.gov, noting the topic area(s) in the subject line. Please include your name and, if applicable, the organization on behalf of which you are submitting comments. To have the most impact, please submit your comments by May 25, 2016.

30. Report on Building Core Capabilities for Life

Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University - March 18, 2016

A new report, Building Core Capabilities for Life: The Science Behind the Skills Adults Need to Succeed in Parenting and in the Workplace (March 2016), combines research findings with practical knowledge and experience to provide strategies for helping individuals develop the skills needed to effectively cope with adversity. These skills are necessary for providing responsive care for children, successfully managing a household, and contributing productively to the community.

31. New, Redesigned Preschool Development Grant Program in Every Student Succeeds Act

Source: U.S. Department of Education - December 10, 2015

On December 10, 2015, President Obama signed into law the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) and will replace the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. It takes full effect during the 2017-18 school year. Guidance to states from the U.S. Department of Education on how the transition process will work is available at http://www.ed.gov/essa. The new federal education law authorizes $250 million annually for a new, redesigned Preschool Development Grant (PDG) program to be administered jointly by the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services and Education.

For more information about additions related to early education, see a commentary from Laura Bornfreund at the New America Foundation.

32. World Family Map 2015: Mapping Family Change and Child Well-Being Outcomes

Source: Child Trends - September 24, 2015

The World Family Map report tracks 16 indicators that affect child and family well-being in 49 countries representing all regions of the world. The indicators were selected by an expert group because of their known relationships to child outcomes in the research literature. The 2015 edition of the report finds that marriage is becoming less common around the world, although in most countries more than half of children live with two parents. Malnutrition rates are decreasing, but many families in developing countries continue to experience undernourishment, poverty and unemployment. Learn more here. The report includes an essay looking at how parents divide labor-force participation, housework, and child care.

33. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention, 36(3) - September 2014

Abstracts of the following articles are available at: http://jei.sagepub.com/content/36/3

The Efficacy of a Home-School Intervention for Preschoolers With Challenging Behaviors: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Preschool First Step to Success.

Edward G. Feil, Andy Frey, Hill M. Walker, Jason W. Small, John R. Seeley, Annemieke Golly, and Steven R. Forness

Preliminary Development of the Parent Involvement in Early Learning Scale for Low-Income Families Enrolled in a Child-Development-Focused Home Visiting Program.

Patricia H. Manz, Amanda L. Gernhart, Catherine B. Bracaliello, Vanessa J. Pressimone, and Rachel A. Eisenberg

Using Rasch Rating Scale Methodology to Examine a Behavioral Screener for Preschoolers At Risk.

Christine DiStefano, Fred W. Greer, R. W. Kamphaus, and William H. Brown

Item-Based Psychometrics of the Preschool Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale.

Cynthia J. Cress, Matthew C. Lambert, and Michael H. Epstein

Measuring the Quality of Inclusive Practices: Findings From the Inclusive Classroom Profile Pilot.

Elena P. Soukakou, Pam J. Winton, Tracey A. West, John H. Sideris, and Lia M. Rucker

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

34. New Video on Supporting Inclusion As Early As Possible

Source: Desired Results access Project - February 9, 2015

The Desired Results access Project recently published a new video on supporting inclusion beginning as early as possible. The video can be viewed online or downloaded at no cost for use in educational and professional development activities from the General Interest section of Desired Results' online Video Library.

  • Team Lydia Rose: Supporting Inclusion Every Day in Every Way (16:18) illustrates how inclusive practices should begin as early as possible and illustrates a range of topics including inclusion, collaboration and teamwork between general and special educators, family-centered early intervention in natural environments, coaching, embedded instruction, family leadership, and more. It has important messages for families who are, or will be, receiving early intervention services, for current and future early intervention practitioners, and for early childhood educators.

The Desired Results access Project, Napa County Office of Education, is funded by the California Department of Education, Special Education Division. Many thanks to Lydia Rose's family, the HOPE Infant Family Support Program, and the Child Development Center at Mira Costa College for their partnership in telling this story.

35. The Effects of an Early Literacy Text Messaging Program for Parents of Preschoolers

Source: National Bureau of Economic Research - November 10, 2014

A new paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), One Step at a Time: The Effects of an Early Literacy Text Messaging Program for Parents of Preschoolers (November 2014 - NBER Working Paper No. 20659), discusses an evaluation of READY4K!, a text messaging program designed to help parents of preschoolers support their children's literacy development. The program breaks down the complexity of parenting into small steps and provides continuous support throughout the school year. The authors found that READY4K! positively affected both parental engagement in home literacy activities with their children and parental involvement at school. These increases translated into children's learning gains in some areas of early literacy. The authors discuss text messaging as a promising approach to supporting parenting practices.

36. Impact Findings from the Head Start CARES Demonstration

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - July 7, 2014

Head Start CARES is a national demonstration that tests the effectiveness of three program enhancements designed to improve preschool children's social-emotional competence. The three enhancements include "The Incredible Years Teacher Training Program," "Preschool PATHS" (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies), and "Tools of the Mind - Play." A new report, Impact Findings from the Head Start CARES Demonstration (July 2014) finds that all three enhancements had positive impacts on teacher practice and on children's social-emotional outcomes during the preschool year, although in varying degrees and not necessarily in the expected ways. The report was published by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

37. New AAP Policy Statement on Early Literacy Promotion

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - June 23, 2014

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently published a formal policy statement recommending that pediatric providers promote early literacy development for children beginning in infancy and continuing at least until the age of kindergarten. Literacy Promotion: An Essential Component of Primary Care Pediatric Practice (June 2014) discusses five recommendations related to: (1) encouraging all parents to read with young children; (2) counseling all parents about developmentally appropriate shared-reading activities; (3) providing developmentally appropriate books at health supervision visits for all high-risk, low-income young children; (4) using a robust spectrum of options to support and promote these efforts; and (5) partnering with other child advocates to influence national messaging and policies that support and promote key early shared-reading experiences.

38. New Video about Strengthening Family Engagement and Family-School Relationships

Source: Results Matter, Colorado Department of Education - April 24, 2014

Results Matter, a program of the Colorado Department of Education, recently posted a new video about strengthening family engagement and family-school relationships in the Results Matter Video Library.

  • Using Text Messaging To Strengthen Family-School Relationships (Runtime 8:12) - This video illustrates how a preschool teacher uses text messaging to help families clearly and quickly understand what their children are learning in the classroom, how they are learning, and ways that they can support their children to learn at home. The teacher, a parent, and the school principal share their perspectives on the use of cell phones and text messaging to build relationships.

All Results Matter videos can be viewed online and downloaded at no cost for use in educational and professional development activities. This clip is posted at the top of the Practices Here and There section of the library.

39. World Family Map 2014: Mapping Family Change and Child Well-Being Outcomes

Source: Child Trends - April 16, 2014

The World Family Map Project identifies and tracks family factors affecting child and family well-being across 60 countries, focusing on 16 specific indicators selected by an expert group because of their known relationships to child outcomes in the research literature. The second annual edition of the World Family Map, World Family Map 2014: Mapping Family Change and Child Well-Being Outcomes, sponsored by Child Trends and a range of educational and nongovernmental institutions from across the globe, is now available online. It includes new indicators and an essay focusing on union stability and early childhood health in developing countries.

40. Guidance Documents from the Office of Special Education Programs

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs - Retrieved April 11, 2014

The U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) recently published the following guidance documents related to the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA):

  • Letter of Clarification on Use of Electronic Mail (March 21, 2014) - Provides clarification in response to a question about the use of email to provide parents with their child's individualized education programs (IEPs) and related documentation, such as progress reports, provided the parents and the school district agree to use the electronic mail option, and the States take the necessary steps to ensure that there are appropriate safeguards to protect the integrity of the process.
  • Dear Colleague Letter on LEA Maintenance of Effort (March 13, 2014) - Informs Chief State School Officers about a provision of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, which states that the level of effort a local educational agency (LEA) must meet under section 613(a)(2)(A)(iii) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), in the year after it fails to maintain effort is the level of effort that would have been required in the absence of that failure and not the LEA's reduced level of expenditures.

OSEP Memos, Dear Colleague Letters and Policy Letters are publicly available online. A subset of OSEP guidance documents related to the early childhood provisions of the IDEA (Part C and Part B, Section 619) can be accessed on the ECTA Center Web site.

41. Being Black Is Not a Risk Factor: A Strengths-Based Look at the State of the Black Child

Source: National Black Child Development Institute - Retrieved October 23, 2013

The National Black Child Development Institute (NBCDI) recently published a new paper, Being Black Is Not a Risk Factor: A Strengths-Based Look at the State of the Black Child (2013). While recognizing the challenges facing African American children and the failure of various systems to address their needs, the report challenges the prevailing discourse about Black children, which overemphasizes limitations and deficits. Instead, it focuses on the considerable strengths, assets and resilience demonstrated by Black children and families. It includes:

  • Essays from experts that focus on using children's, families' and communities' strengths to improve outcomes for Black children
  • "Points of Proof" from organizations that serve not as exceptions, but as examples of places where Black children and families are succeeding
  • Data points that indicate how Black children and families are doing across a range of measures

42. Videos from the National Summit on Hispanic Early Learning

Source: White House Initiative on Educational Excellence For Hispanics - September 18, 2013

On September 18, 2013, the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence For Hispanics and the President's Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics hosted a National Summit on Hispanic Early Learning in Miami, FL. A video message from James Heckman, Nobel Prize winning Professor of Education at the University of Chicago, was shown at the summit. Videos of the full event (Part 1 / Part 2 / Part 3 / Part 4 / Part 5) can be seen on Miami-Dade College's YouTube channel. Hispanic children represent the fastest growing segment of the nation's population under the age of five, but less than half are enrolled in any early learning program.

43. Research Findings - Young Children with Autism Benefit Regardless of High-Quality Treatment Model

Source: Frank Porter Graham Child Development, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - July 18, 2013

A new FPG Snapshot summarizes research results from a study finding that preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) who receive high-quality early intervention make significant positive gains during the school year regardless of the comprehensive treatment model used (TEACCH, LEAP or a high-quality special education program without a specific model). The results may shift the field's thinking about treatment models for young children with ASD and may have important implications for special-education programs and school classrooms across the country. To learn more, see The LEAP and TEACCH Comprehensive Treatment Models: Comparing Outcomes for Preschoolers with Autism in High-Quality Classrooms (2013).

Full article citation: Boyd, B. A., Hume, K., McBee, M. T., Alessandri, M., Gutierrez, A., Johnson, L., ... Odom, S. L. (2013). Comparative efficacy of LEAP, TEACCH and non-model-specific special education programs for preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Advance online publication. doi:10.1007/s10803-013-1877-9

44. InBrief - Executive Function: Essential Skills for Life and Learning

Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University - September 27, 2012

Executive function skills help us to focus on multiple streams of information at the same time and revise plans as necessary. A new evidence base has identified these skills as being essential for school achievement, success in work, and healthy lives. The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University has published a new two-page summary, InBrief: Executive Function: Essential Skills for Life and Learning (2012), outlining how these skills develop, what can disrupt their development, and how supporting them pays off in school and life.

See also, the Center's related 5-minute video, Executive Function: Skills for Life and Learning (2012), as well as a new online training module to help early care and education providers better understand and support the development of executive function skills, produced by the Washington State Department of Early Learning, in collaboration with the Center's Frontiers of Innovation initiative.

45. New Video - Executive Function: Skills for Life and Learning

Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University - June 26, 2012

Executive functioning skills help us to focus on multiple streams of information at the same time and revise plans as necessary. Acquiring the early building blocks of these skills is an important and challenging task in early childhood. A new 5-minute video, Executive Function: Skills for Life and Learning (2012), looks at how these skills develop, what can disrupt their development, and how supporting them pays off in school and life. The video provides an overview of Building the Brain's "Air Traffic Control" System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function (2011), the joint Working Paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and the National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs.

46. The Brain Science of Early Childhood: Tools to Help You Deliver the Neuroscience Message

Source: ReadyNation and the Center on the Developing Child - Retrieved May 25, 2012

ReadyNation, with help from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, has compiled a variety of tools to help lay speakers present information about research findings on early brain development as a body of evidence for investing in young children. The Brain Science of Early Childhood: Tools to Help You Deliver the Neuroscience Message includes a PowerPoint presentation with embedded (90 second) videos and annotations, which can be delivered by a lay person; five short videos with an accompanying set of talking points; and four one-page briefs that describe different areas of the development of the brain in the first five years of life.

47. New Fact Sheets About Low-income Children Under Age 3 and Under Age 6

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - February 22, 2012

Census numbers for 2010 show that the official child poverty rate in the United States increased for the fourth year in a row. The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has published the following updated fact sheets describing the demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic characteristics of young children and their families - highlighting important factors that appear to distinguish low-income and poor children from their less disadvantaged peers.

48. Developing Kindergarten Readiness and Other Large-Scale Assessment Systems

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children - Retrieved December 29, 2011

The Center for Applied Research at the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) has developed new guidance to support states' development and implementation of kindergarten readiness assessment systems. Developing Kindergarten Readiness and Other Large-Scale Assessment Systems: Necessary Considerations in the Assessment of Young Children (December 2011) is available online at http://www.naeyc.org/resources/research/kreadinessassessment

49. Today's Children, Tomorrow's America: Six Experts Face the Facts

Source: Urban Institute - Retrieved November 4, 2011

The Urban Institute has published a new report, Today's Children, Tomorrow's America: Six Experts Face the Facts (October 2011), in which six scholars discuss early childhood programs and why these programs should be given more funding. It includes the following essays:

  • Children Caught in the Budget Crossfire, by Eugene Steuerle
  • Budgeting for Tomorrow's Workforce and Economy, by Robert D. Reischauer
  • Persistent Childhood Poverty's Double Whammy, by Margaret Simms
  • Translating Good Ideas into Budget Realities for Children, by Olivia Golden
  • The Children's Budget — The Federal/State Bargain, by Kim Rueben
  • What Spending on Child Health Looks Like, by Lisa Dubay

To learn more and to access the report, go to http://www.urban.org/publications/412427.html

50. Race To The Top - Early Learning Challenge FAQs and Work Shop Materials Now Available

Source: U.S. Department of Education - Retrieved September 16, 2011

The U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services (the Departments) recently posted Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/racetothetop-earlylearningchallenge/faq.html

On Tuesday, September 13th, the Departments hosted a RTT - ELC Technical Assistance Workshop for State Applicants in Washington, D.C. with simultaneous Video-tele Conferencing to the ten U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Regional Offices. The slides from that workshop are available for reference at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/racetothetop-earlylearningchallenge/technical-assistance-workshop-slides-sept-13-2011.pdf

The Departments will provide additional or updated program guidance as necessary on the RTT-ELC Web site at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/racetothetop-earlylearningchallenge/index.html. For further questions, please email RTT.Early.Learning.Challenge@ed.gov

51. State Performance Plan Process and Indicators: A Policy Forum

Source: Project Forum - Retrieved August 8, 2011

Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education has published the proceedings from a policy forum held May 11-13, 2011, to provide input to the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) about the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) accountability reporting system known as the State Performance Plan/ Annual Performance Report (SPP/APR) process. Participants discussed the benefits and challenges of the SPP/APR requirements and made recommendations for improvement. No attempt was made to develop consensus recommendations and all input was accepted and documented. State Performance Plan Process and Indicators: A Policy Forum (July 2011) is available online at http://projectforum.org/docs/StatePerformancePlanProcessandIndicators.pdf

52. Report on How Quality Rating and Improvement Systems Support Early Childhood Workforce Quality

Source: Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, University of California at Berkeley - Retrieved July 20, 2011

The Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at the University of California at Berkeley recently published a research brief that looks at the extent to which Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) include key elements that support or improve early childhood workforce quality, especially in the following four areas: staff qualifications, professional development, compensation and benefits, and workplace environment. Staff Preparation, Reward, and Support: Are Quality Rating and Improvement Systems Addressing All of the Key Ingredients Necessary for Change? (2011), by Lea J.E. Austin, Marcy Whitebook, Maia Connors, and Rory Darrah, is available at http://www.irle.berkeley.edu/cscce/2011/staff-preparation-reward-and-support-are-quality-rating-and-improvement-systems-including-all-of-the-key-ingredients-necessary-for-change/

53. Racial Gaps in Early Childhood: Socio-emotional Health, Developmental, and Educational Outcomes Among African-American Boys

Source: National Center on Children in Poverty - Retrieved May 27, 2011

The National Center on Children in Poverty (NCCP) has published a new report that examines racial gaps in early childhood. The main research questions addressed include the following:

  1. What racial gaps emerge across cognitive and socioemotional development in early childhood among African-American infant, toddler, preschooler, and kindergarten boys and white-American boys?
  2. Do these gaps remain after controlling for family socio-economic status (SES) and other child, family, and home environment characteristics?
  3. What factors contribute to early resilience and buffer against these risks among African-American boys?

The report, Racial Gaps in Early Childhood: Socio-emotional Health, Developmental, and Educational Outcomes Among African-American Boys (2011), by Yumiko Aratani, Vanessa R. Wight, and Janice L. Cooper, is available online at http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_1014.html

54. Grant Notice from the Office of Head Start - National Center on Health

Source: Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Head Start - May 6, 2011

The Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start (OHS), has announced the availability of $3,000,000 to be competitively awarded for a National Center on Health. The goal of the Center is to provide a vehicle for the dissemination of a clear, consistent message from OHS about its priorities for Head Start (HS) and Early Head Start (EHS) programs and their partners to develop and implement effective practices in the areas of health; nutrition; health promotion; disease prevention; access to medical and dental care; mental wellness for staff, children, and families; safe environments; health literacy; emergency preparedness; oral health; and obesity prevention. The Center will showcase evidence-based practices that ensure all HS and EHS programs have access to the same level of high quality information in order to produce the best possible outcomes for children. The closing date applications is July 6, 2011. To learn more, go to http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/open/foa/view/HHS-2011-ACF-OHS-HC-0190

55. Grant Notice - Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education & Rehabilitative Services - April 13, 2011

On April 13, 2011, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education & Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) posted the following grant notice in the Federal Register:

Title: Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities (CFDA Nos. 84.325D, 325K, 325T).
Summary: The purposes of this program are to (1) help address State-identified needs for highly qualified personnel in special education, related services, early intervention, and regular education to work with children, including infants and toddlers, with disabilities; and (2) ensure that those personnel have the necessary skills and knowledge, derived from practices that have been determined through scientifically-based research and experience, to be successful in serving those children.
Applications Due: May 31, 2011
For additional information, go to: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-04-13/pdf/2011-8745.pdf

56. New Resources from CDC's "Learn the Signs, Act Early" Program

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Retrieved February 21, 2011

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) "Learn the Signs, Act Early" program seeks to improve early identification of children with autism and other developmental disabilities. The program recently released two new resources for parents:

Programs interested in using the brochure for public awareness activities can request customization by sending an email to ActEarly@cdc.gov and providing the local contact information and logos to be included.

57. Building the Brain's "Air Traffic Control" System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function

Source: Center for the Developing Child at Harvard University - February 9, 2011

Executive functioning skills help us to focus on multiple streams of information at the same time and revise plans as necessary. Acquiring the early building blocks of these skills is an important and challenging task in the early childhood years. A new joint Working Paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and the National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs explains how these skills develop, what can disrupt their development, and how supporting them pays off in school and life. Building the Brain's "Air Traffic Control" System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function (February 2011) is available online at http://developingchild.harvard.edu/index.php/resources/reports_and_working_papers/working_papers/wp11/

58. Basic Facts About Low-income Children Under Age 3 and Under Age 6

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - Retrieved November 4, 2010

The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has published the following new facts describing the demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic characteristics of young children and their parents and highlighting the important factors that appear to distinguish low-income and poor children from their less disadvantaged counterparts.

59. Essays Discuss New Directions for Investing in Young Children

Source: Brookings Institute and the National Institute for Early Education Research - October 13, 2010

A new collection of essays issued by the Brookings Institute and the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) assesses federal policies for early childhood education and child care, and provides recommendations for reforming Head Start and other early education programs to make them more targeted, more effective, and more cost-efficient. To learn more, see Investing in Young Children: New Directions in Federal Preschool and Early Childhood Policy (2010), edited by Ron Haskins and W. Steven Barnett, at http://www.brookings.edu/reports/2010/1013_investing_in_young_children_haskins.aspx

60. Recent Publications from the National Center for Children in Poverty

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - Retrieved August 5, 2010

The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) recently released a number of new publications related to early childhood care and development. These include:

61. Learning How Much Quality is Necessary to Get to Good Results for Children

Source: National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education - Retrieved March 19, 2010

The National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education (NCRECE) has published a new short brief, entitled Learning How Much Quality is Necessary to Get to Good Results for Children (NCRECE In Focus, v.1, no.2), which summarizes the results of a study examining data on teacher-child interactions and instructional quality from an 11-state pre-kindergarten evaluation. To read the brief, go to http://ncrece.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/NCRECEInFocusV1I2Thresholdanalysis.pdf

62. Fact Sheet - Who Are America's Poor Children? The Official Story

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - January 21, 2010

The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has published a new fact sheet, entitled Who Are America's Poor Children? The Official Story (January 2010), by Vanessa R. Wight, Michelle Chau, and Yumiko Aratani. This fact sheet looks at the characteristics of children who are considered poor by the official standard in America and the hardships faced by these children. It also provides recommendations on what should be done about child poverty. It is available online at http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_912.html

63. The BUILD Initiative and Early Childhood Systems Development, 2002 to 2009

Source: Child & Family Policy Center - Retrieved January 14, 2010

The Child & Family Policy Center (CFPC) has completed its 2009 evaluation essay for the Build Initiative, an 8-state learning community supported by a broad-based group of foundations included in the Early Childhood Funders Collaborative. The essay describes the advances made in early childhood systems building within the Build states and the leadership roles both states and the national Build effort have played in promoting comprehensive approaches to early childhood. The First Seven Years: The BUILD Initiative and Early Childhood Systems Development, 2002 to 2009 is available online at http://www.cfpciowa.org/uploaded/Build%20Presentations/BUILD%20-%20First%207%20years-2.pdf

64. Basic Facts About Low-income Children Under Age 3 and Under Age 6

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - November 18, 2009

In 2008, 44 percent of young children under age 3 and under age 6 in the U.S. lived in low-income families and 22 percent lived in poor families. The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has published new fact sheets that describe the demographic, socio-economic, and geographic characteristics of these very young children and their parents, highlighting important factors that appear to distinguish them from their less disadvantaged counterparts.

65. 2009 Kids Count Data Book - Counting What Counts: Taking Results Seriously for Vulnerable Children and Families

Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation - July 30, 2009

The 2009 KIDS COUNT Data Book is now available online. This annual report profiles the well-being of America's children on a state-by-state basis and ranks states on 10 key measures of child well-being. This year's essay, entitled Counting What Counts: Taking Results Seriously for Vulnerable Children and Families, outlines a series of action steps to improve the nation's use of data in creating policies that improve the lives of vulnerable children and families. The report is available online at http://datacenter.kidscount.org/databook/2009/Default.aspx

66. Homeless and Special Education Administrative Collaboration: Recommendations

Source: Project Forum at NASDSE - Retrieved November 25, 2008

Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) has published a new proceedings document entitled Homeless and Special Education Administrative Collaboration: Recommendations, by Diana Bowman, Paula Burdette, and Patricia Julianelle. The document highlights challenges faced by administrators who support homeless education under the McKinney-Vento Act and those who provide early intervention and special education services for children with disabilities who are homeless. It includes recommendations on developing policies and practices for: (1) expediting enrollment and provision of services; and (2) coordinating programs and services. It is available online at http://www.projectforum.org/docs/HomelessandSpecialEducationAdministrativeCollaboration.pdf

67. Journal of ZERO TO THREE - Current Trends in Child Welfare Policy & Practice

Source: ZERO TO THREE - July 18, 2008

Hundreds of thousands of very young children in the United States are the victims of child abuse and neglect each year. Researchers have linked early childhood maltreatment to a number of physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioral difficulties. The July issue of the Journal of ZERO TO THREE focuses on current issues affecting children and their families involved in the child welfare system. To learn more go to http://www.zerotothree.org/site/MessageViewer?em_id=3401.0

68. Webinar - Partnering with the Private and Philanthropic Sectors: A Governor's Guide to Investing in Early Childhood

Source: National Governors' Association Center for Best Practices - May 29, 2008

The National Governors' Association Center for Best Practices (NGO) is hosting a webinar on June 10th from 3:00-4:30 p.m. ET to announce the release of a new report entitled Partnering with the Private and Philanthropic Sectors: A Governor's Guide to Investing in Early Childhood. The webinar will include a panel of presenters highlighting recommendations from the report. It is open to all governors' offices, state policymakers and early childhood organizations.

Registration is required for the web-based portion of the call. To RSVP, please e-mail Cardella Mingo at cmingo@nga.org by 5 p.m. ET on Wednesday, June 4 with the following information: Name, Title & Affiliation, State. No RSVP is necessary to participate in the conference call portion. To join the call please dial 1-866-537-1630 and enter pass code 6259961#.

69. Notice of Proposed Rulemaking - Assistance to States for the Education of Children With Disabilities and Preschool Grants for Children With Disabilities

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services - May 13, 2008

The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) has posted proposed amendments to the regulations governing the Assistance to States for the Education of Children with Disabilities Program and Preschool Grants for Children with Disabilities Program, as published in the Federal Register on August 14, 2006. These proposed regulations have not previously been available for public comment. The announcement states, "In developing final regulations for the Assistance to States for the Education of Children with Disabilities Program, we identified certain issues for which additional regulatory changes might be necessary." These issues include:

  • Parental revocation of consent after consenting to the initial provision of services
  • A State's or local educational agency's (LEA's) obligation to make positive efforts to employ qualified individuals
  • Representation of parents by non-attorneys in due process hearings
  • State monitoring, technical assistance, and enforcement of the Part B program
  • The allocation of funds, under sections 611 and 619 of the Act, to LEAs that are not serving any children with disabilities
Comments must be received on or before July 28, 2008. For complete information go to http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2008/E8-10522.htm

70. The Dividends of Investing Early: Why We Need to Help the Youngest Children of Immigrants

Source: Foundation for Child Development - October 26, 2007

The Foundation for Child Development's 2007 Annual Report All our Children? Health and Education of Children of Immigrants includes an essay by Alexandra Fuenmayor Starr entitled The Dividends of Investing Early: Why We Need to Help the Youngest Children of Immigrants. The author discusses the impact that young children of immigrants, over 90 percent of whom are citizens, will have on America's cultural and economic future. It is available at http://www.fcd-us.org/resources/resources_show.htm?doc_id=561788.

71. 2007 KIDS COUNT Data Book Available Online

Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation - July 26, 2007

Data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation's 2007 KIDS COUNT Data Book are now available and can be searched in an online database that allows users to generate custom graphs, maps, ranked lists, and state-by-state profiles. Go to http://www.kidscount.org/datacenter/databook.jsp. This year's essay focuses on the 726,000 children who spend time in foster care each year and outlines steps that can be taken to ensure that every child has a genuine chance to be part of a lifelong family. It is available at http://www.kidscount.org/datacenter/db_essay.jsp

72. New! IES Web site Message Board

Source: Institute of Education Sciences - April 26, 2007

The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) recently announced an online forum designed to help anyone with questions relating to education issues and IES Web site activities such as data tools, searches, funding availability, upcoming conferences or workshops, and publications. The IES Message Board seeks to provide the public with a medium to interact with others on focused educational topics as they relate to IES. For more information go to http://ies.ed.gov/whatsnew/messageboard/About.aspx [Note: Link checked on 2/22/2007 - this document is no longer available online. The IES Web site is available at http://ies.ed.gov/].

73. 2006 KIDS COUNT Data Book Now Available Online

Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation - Retrieved June 30, 2006

The 2006 KIDS COUNT Data Book provides national and state-by-state data on the well-being of America's children. States are ranked on 10 key indicators and information is provided on topics such as child health, immigrant children, education, and family economic conditions. The report shows that between 2000 and 2004, three of the ten child well-being indicators worsened, including the numbers of children living in poverty, the percentage of low-birthweight babies, and the number of children living in families where no parent has full-time, year-round employment. This year's essay, Family, Friend and Neighbor Care; Strengthening a Critical Resource to Help Young Children Succeed, focuses on improving early childhood development opportunities for young children living in low-income neighborhoods and how to support family-based child care providers.

Data book - http://www.kidscount.org/datacenter/databook.jsp
Essay - http://www.kidscount.org/datacenter/db_essay.jsp

74. Two New Working Papers from the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER)

Source: NIEER - Retrieved May 31, 2006

The following two working papers from the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) are now available online:

Is More Better? The Effects of Full-Day vs Half-Day Preschool on Early School Achievement
This paper discusses a randomized trial that compared children from low-income families in half-day and full-day public preschool programs. Results show that children attending full-day programs did better on mathematics and literacy tests than children in a 2.5 to 3-hour public preschool program and the achievement gains continued at least until the end of first grade. The paper is available online at http://nieer.org/docs/index.php?DocID=144

How Much Does Quality Preschool Cost?
Research demonstrates that quality preschool programs are a good economic investment. However, there is less information available that examines how much funding is necessary for programs to be successful. This working paper looks at current state spending on preschool, identifies aspects of programs that are related to cost, and provides estimates of the funding needed to achieve desired levels of access and quality. It is available at http://nieer.org/resources/research/CostOfEffectivePreschool.pdf

75. New Web Site Presents Collaboration Opportunities for Medicaid's Child Health Component and State Maternal and Child Health Programs

Source: MCH Alert - May 12, 2006

The EPSDT and Title V Collaboration to Improve Child Health is a Web-based tool designed to help Medicaid and state maternal and child health (MCH) agencies identify opportunities for working together to ensure children's access to and receipt of the full range of Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program services. The Web site was developed by the Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau in partnership with George Washington University's Department of Health Policy. The Web site provides information about how Medicaid's EPSDT program works with public health, families, managed care organizations, pediatricians, and other health professionals to finance appropriate and necessary pediatric services. Information about the role of MCH programs in fulfilling the potential of EPSDT, family support strategies, data monitoring, and policy and legislative issues is also included. The Web site is available at http://www.hrsa.gov/epsdt.

[Originally published in MCHAlert © 2006 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

76. Early Care and Education: Realizing a Collective Vision

Source: National Economic Development and Law Center - Retrieved November 4, 2005

The National Economic Development and Law Center (NEDLC) developed a model to bring together diverse stakeholders to support early care and education programs for young children and promote awareness of the economic impact of these programs. Early care and education experts, business leaders, researchers, elected officials, and economic development professionals were convened in seven states (California, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Ohio) to advise NEDLC's research and develop policy recommendations to support early care and education in each state. Data and recommendations were compiled into state reports that included demographic information on the early care and education industry, the direct economic impact of the early care and education industry, returns on public investment in early care and education, and recommendations for strengthening the system.

This report describes how the model was implemented in these seven states, and it provides steps for implementing the model in other states, including setting policy agendas, developing effective messages, building relationships, and engaging new partners. It is meant to help states work towards a collective vision of early care and education by enhancing public awareness of the societal benefits of investing in programs for young children. Available online at http://www.insightcced.org/uploads///publications/ece/ecerealizing.pdf

77. Cost of Meeting House and Senate Proposed Head Start Teacher Qualification Requirements

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) - July 14, 2005

A new analysis from the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) provides a preliminary estimate of the necessary level of funding needed to raise the degree qualifications to meet the requirements in the Head Start reauthorization legislation currently proposed in the House and Senate. While each bill is designed to improve the quality of Head Start programs by requiring an increase in the number of teachers with a bachelor's degree or higher, there are important differences in the two proposals. To read the full report go to http://www.clasp.org/publications/head_start_memo.pdf

78. Early Reading First Program - Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal Year (FY) 2005

Source: Federal Register: December 23, 2004 (Volume 69, Number 246)

The U.S. Department of Education released the fiscal year 2005 Early Reading First application on December 28, 2004. Early Reading First, part of the President's "Good Start, Grow Smart" initiative, is designed to transform existing early education programs into centers of excellence that provide high-quality, early education to young children, especially those from low-income families. The overall purpose of the Early Reading First Program is to prepare young children to enter kindergarten with the necessary language, cognitive, and early reading skills to prevent reading difficulties and ensure school success. For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2004-4/122304a.html.

79. Survey Points to Gap in Developmental/Behavioral Pediatrics Training

Source: The Commonwealth Fund - November 1, 2004

For pediatricians, managing issues of child development and behavior is essential for providing comprehensive preventive care. But according to a new Commonwealth Fund Issue Brief , some pediatric faculty members may lack the expertise necessary to provide comprehensive resident training in this subject. The Issue Brief draws on data from a Web-based survey e-mailed to nearly 1,700 members of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association from March to April 2004. Most of the pediatric faculty responding to the survey felt that too little time was devoted to training in this subject. Nearly all respondents agreed that enhancing faculty skills in this area would significantly improve residents' training but cited lack of release time and funding to attend continuing education as important barriers.

The Issue Brief, entitled A Need for Faculty Development in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics is available online at http://www.cmwf.org/usr_doc/785_Schor_faculty_devel_IB.pdf.

80. Comment Request; Report of Early Intervention Services on IFSPs Provided to Infants, Toddlers and Their Families in Accordance With Part C and Report of Number and Type of Personnel Employed and Contracted To Provide Early Intervention Services [OSERS]

Source: Federal Register: June 25, 2004 (Volume 69, Number 122)

Title: Report of Early Intervention Services on IFSPs Provided to Infants, Toddlers and Their Families in Accordance With Part C and Report of Number and Type of Personnel Employed and Contracted To Provide Early Intervention Services.

Reporting and Recordkeeping Hour Burden: Responses: 56. Burden Hours: 4,760.

Abstract: This package provides instructions and forms necessary for States to report, by race and ethnicity, the number of infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families receiving different types of part C services, and the number of personnel employed and contracted to provide services for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families. Data are obtained from state and local service agencies and are used to assess and monitor the implementation of IDEA and for Congressional reporting.

For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/2004-2/062504b.html.

81. Early Reading First National Evaluation: Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests

Source: Federal Register: April 26, 2004 (Volume 69, Number 80)

Abstract: The proposed data collection is necessary to complete the national evaluation of Early Reading First. For more information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/2004-2/042604a.html.

82. Research to Practice Materials (Early Head Start Information Kit)

Source: www.acf.hhs.gov/ - February 2003

Important findings from the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project were released in a series of research reports. New Research to Practice materials are available that distill the findings from these reports and include key messages from the Project. They are organized for easy use by program, regional, and federal staff, as well as training and technical assistance providers.  Two groups of materials are included - one focusing on overall findings and the other focusing on special topics. For each set of materials, a research brief is available, accompanied by a PowerPoint presentation and corresponding Talking Points. You are invited to download, review, and customize materials for presentations to staff, parents, trainers, community partners, government officials, and other interested stakeholders at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/ehs/ehs_resrch/index.html

83. Child Care, Health, and SIDS Prevention Partners Unite to Reduce SIDS in Child Care Settings

Source: MCH Alert - February 14, 2003

The Healthy Child Care America Back to Sleep Campaign, sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration, is a national effort to reduce the number of deaths related to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in family child care homes and center-based child care programs.  The campaign, which builds on the success of two recent public awareness campaigns, unites child care, health, and SIDS prevention partners across the country. The campaign offers technical assistance and resources to (1) promote the back-to-sleep message to those who care for young children, (2) raise awareness and change practices in child care settings, (3) disseminate information on new national child care standards related to SIDS risk reduction, and (4) support states to establish or improve child care regulations. More information about the campaign and links to other resources and organizations are available at http://www.healthychildcare.org/section_SIDS.cfm.

[Originally published in MCHAlert ©  2003 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University.  Reprinted with permission.]

84. Paige Announces $72 Million in Early Reading First Grants

Source: www.ed.gov/PressReleases/ - January 23, 2003

U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige today announced the first-ever Early Reading First grants -- 30 grants totaling more than $72 million -- to support local efforts to improve the language and pre-reading skills of young children.  Early Reading First is President Bush's initiative to transform existing early education programs into centers of excellence that provide high-quality, early education to young children, especially those from low-income families. It builds upon the president's vast Good Start, Grow Smart initiative to improve early learning.

 School districts, other public, nonprofit and private organizations -- including faith-based organizations -- and collaborations of the same entities competed for the grants. The grants announced today are going to organizations in 22 states. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) for up to three years, the projects incorporate strategies, curricula, materials and professional development for teachers to prepare young children to enter kindergarten with the necessary language, cognitive and early reading skills that can avert reading difficulties and ensure continued school success.  For more information go to:
http://www2.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2003/01/01232003.html

85. Education Secretary Applauds Bipartisan Passage of Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002

Source: www.ed.gov - October 17, 2002

U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige today issued the following statement on the passage of legislation creating a new education research office -- a key principle of No Child Left Behind: "This is another big win for improving the education of America's children.  Both the House and Senate have worked hard on passing this legislation and I applaud their commitment and focus on this very important issue.  Like the administration, Congress recognizes the importance of providing our schools   with the best tools necessary to successfully teach our children.

"One of the major tenets of our education policy is that teaching and learning practices be based on sound, scientific research.  Congress shares that understanding with us and it is clear from this bill that they view the role of research as the cornerstone of educational reform.  Also critical is the fact that this bill establishes the new Institute of Education Sciences, which will include national education centers focused on research, statistics, and evaluation, and will allow us to move forward aggressively to support the high-quality research, evaluation, and statistical activities needed to improve education policy and practice.

To read the full press release go to: http://www2.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2002/10/10172002.html

Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center

  • CB 8040
  • Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040
  • phone: 919.962.2001
  • fax: 919.966.7463
  • email: ectacenter@unc.edu

The ECTA Center is a program of the FPG Child Development Institute of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, funded through cooperative agreement number H326P120002 from the Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent the Department of Education's position or policy.

  • FPG Child Development Institute
  • IDEAs that Work