Home Visiting Resources

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1. Investing Early: Taking Stock of Outcomes and Economic Returns from Early Childhood Programs

Source: RAND Corporation

The RAND Corporation has published a free ebook (December 2017) that examines the evaluations of 115 early childhood programs. The authors studied a variety of early intervention programs, including preschool, home visiting, and parent education. The findings reveal that most of the programs have positive effects on at least one child outcome, and those with a cost evaluation tend to show positive economic results. The evidence confirms that high quality early childhood programs improve the lives of children and their families.

2. Home Visiting Programs Implemented in Tribal Communities - Research Review

Source: U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE)

An updated OPRE report (August 2017) describes the findings from research literature and effectiveness studies of home visiting programs implemented in tribal communities or evaluated with American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) families and children. A companion report describes the lessons learned across the reviewed studies, with a focus on cultural relevance and implementation, followed by proposed considerations for building the research literature on tribal home visiting programs.

3. Using Medicaid and other Federal Funds to Finance Home Visiting Services

Source: National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) & Alliance for Early Success

Some states currently use Medicaid and other federal funding, such as the Maternal and Infant Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) fund, to finance effective evidence-based home visiting programs. These programs typically include screening, case management, and family support and counseling for pregnant women and children from birth through kindergarten. This new brief (August 2017) explains how federal funding is used for this purpose and explores new opportunities for integrating home visiting into state health reform initiatives.

4. 2017 Home Visiting Yearbook

Source: National Home Visiting Resource Center

The National Home Visiting Resource Center has recently published its 2017 Home Visiting Yearbook, an exhaustive resource of key data on early childhood home visiting, a service delivery strategy proven to help children and their families thrive. The resource includes a historical timeline, a sample of evidence-based models, funding information, and state profiles.

5. A Journey Toward Strong Programs and Thriving Families

Source: HHS, Office of Early Childhood Development

The Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (Tribal MIECHV) program provides grants to develop, implement, and evaluate home visiting programs in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. A Journey Toward Strong Programs and Thriving Families: The Story of Three Tribal Home Visiting Grantees (May 2017) describes the experiences of three communities that have participated in the Tribal MIECHV program and the impacts the program has had. It discusses the systems changes that can provide a lasting and strong foundation upon which evidence-based home visiting programs can succeed and provides insights for other communities working on home visiting. Learn more about Tribal Home Visiting implementation.

6. Promoting the Educational Success of Children and Youth Learning English

Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine - Retrieved May 15, 2017

Children who are dual language learners (DLLs) and English learners (ELs) face a number of challenges in settings where English is the primary language used for instruction and assessment. A recently published report, Promoting the Educational Success of Children and Youth Learning English: Promising Futures (2017), looks at how research findings related to the development of DLLs/ELs can inform education policies, health policies, and practices that enhance educational outcomes for these children. The report includes a chapter on promising and effective early care and education practices and home visiting programs for DLLs.

7. Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness - Updated Reviews

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - April 6, 2017

The Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) project was launched in Fall 2009 to conduct thorough and transparent reviews of the home visiting research literature and to assess the evidence of effectiveness for home visiting program models that serve families with pregnant women and children from birth to age 5. HomVEE recently released updated evidence reviews on the following two models:

The HomVEE project has currently identified 18 models that meet the the Department of Health and Human Services' criteria for evidence of effectiveness.

8. Joint Statement on Collaboration and Coordination of the MIECHV and IDEA Part C Programs

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - January 19, 2017

A new Joint Statement on Collaboration and Coordination of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Part C Programs (January 2017) sets a vision for stronger partnerships, collaboration, and coordination between awardees of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part C Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (IDEA Part C Program). The statement:

  • Provides an overview of the MIECHV and the IDEA Part C Programs;
  • Emphasizes the potential for collaboration and coordination between MIECHV awardees and the IDEA Part C State programs
  • Highlights existing opportunities for partnerships between MIECHV awardees and the IDEA Part C State programs; and
  • Provides recommendations to States, territories, tribal entities, and local programs for identifying and increasing opportunities for collaboration and coordination.

9. Integrating Home Visiting in State and Tribal Early Childhood Systems

Source: ZERO TO THREE - January 18, 2017

ZERO TO THREE's Policy Center recently released a new framework for Integrating Home Visiting in State and Tribal Early Childhood Systems (2017). It highlights seven areas where there are opportunities to better integrate home visiting in the early childhood system. Each area includes a definition, a list of strategies, and several state and tribal examples. ZERO TO THREE developed the framework in collaboration with community of practice teams from six states (Illinois, Missouri, New York, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin), in order to share strategies and examples with the field. Any additional examples from states or tribes can be shared with ZERO TO THREE at policycenter@zerotothree.org.

10. Home Visiting Programs: Reviewing Evidence of Effectiveness

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - October 3, 2016

The Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) project was launched in Fall 2009 to conduct a thorough and transparent review of the home visiting research literature and to provide an assessment of the evidence of effectiveness for home visiting program models that serve families with pregnant women and children from birth to age 5. Its latest brief describes the HomVEE review process, review results, and the 19 program models determined to meet the Department of Health and Human Services' criteria for an "evidence-based early childhood home visiting service delivery model."

11. Investments in Early Learning - State Profiles

Source: Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - April 12, 2016

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) recently developed Investments in Early Childhood - State Profiles to celebrate young children and highlight important early learning investments by location, type of investment, amount of investment, and key demographics for each location. These investments have paid for efforts to help build a continuum of care beginning with voluntary home visiting and continuing until children enter kindergarten.

12. Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting: A Report to Congress

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - April 4, 2016

Since 2010, the Tribal Home Visiting Program has expanded home visiting services in tribal communities, serving 1,523 families and providing nearly 20,000 home visits to some of the most vulnerable American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) families, who often experience multiple challenges. See Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting: A Report to Congress (April 2016) to learn more about the program, program implementation, program successes, and areas where improvement is needed.

13. Early Care and Education 2015 Legislative Action

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) - January 2016

The latest NCSL annual report on early care and education bills enacted during the 2015 session, Early Care and Education 2015 Legislative Action (January 2016), highlights significant 2015 legislative enactments for young children and families covering: appropriations and financing, child care (subsidy, quality, and access), early childhood data strategies, early childhood governance and systems, early childhood services, early childhood workforce, home visiting and parent education, and prekindergarten and school readiness. The report does not reflect all bills enacted during the 2015 session. For a complete list, go to the NCSL Early Education and Child Care Bill Tracking Database.

14. A New Framework for Assessing the Effectiveness of Home Visiting Programs

Source: Pew Home Visiting Campaign - October 12, 2015

In 2013, the Pew Home Visiting Campaign launched the Home Visiting Data for Performance Initiative to develop and build consensus around a set of key performance measures that states can adopt to determine whether their goals are being achieved across a portfolio of home visiting programs. The final report from this initiative, Using Data to Measure Performance of Home Visiting: A New Framework for Assessing Effectiveness (October 2015) is now available online. It provides information to support state and local managers in collecting, analyzing, and using data to gain a clear picture of who is being served in their home visiting programs, to accurately measure the outcomes of these programs, and to improve practices that lead to strong results for vulnerable young families.

15. Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness 2015 Review

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - October 8, 2015

Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) was launched in 2009 to identify home visiting models that meet criteria of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for an evidence-based early childhood home visiting service delivery model. HomVEE has released the results of its 2015 review. The review found two new models that meet the evidence criteria: Healthy Beginnings and the Health Access Nurturing Development Services (HANDS). Read the executive summary to learn more.

16. National Spread of Home Visiting Models, 1983-2015

Source: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago - August 28, 2015

A short video, Home Visiting: The Expansion of an Idea (Runtime 2:59 minutes), displays how five evidence-based home visiting models (Healthy Families America, Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters - HIPPY, Nurse Family Partnership, Parents as Teachers, and SafeCare) have spread throughout the country from 1983-2015. The video does not represent all investments in home visiting, but illustrates how these five models have expanded over the years and how communities increasingly gained access to a greater array of home visiting options.

17. A Good Start: Advances in Early Childhood Development

Source: Bernard van Leer Foundation - Retrieved August 5, 2015

A special issue of Early Childhood Matters, A Good Start: Advances in Early Childhood Development, marks the 50th anniversary of the Bernard van Leer Foundation's first grant in early childhood. It is guest-edited by Joan Lombardi and includes contributions from experts on a range of subjects including brain science, nutrition, home visiting, parent support, pre-primary, fatherhood, emergency contexts, and children with disabilities, measurement and leadership. Examples of early childhood programmes from around the world are included.

18. Updates and State Fact Sheets on the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

Source: Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau - April 8, 2015

Congress established the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) in 2010 to support voluntary, evidence-based home visiting services for at-risk pregnant women and parents with young children up to kindergarten entry. A new paper, The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Partnering with Parents to Help Children Succeed (2015) provides updated information on program participants, efforts to expand services to more families and communities, notable achievements, the Tribal Home Visiting Program, and research and evaluation. New Home Visiting State Fact Sheets (2015) have also been released, providing data on how the program is helping families in each State, including home visits made; parents, children and communities served; and evidence-based models used.

19. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention, 36(3) - September 2014

Abstracts of the following articles are available at: http://jei.sagepub.com/content/36/3

The Efficacy of a Home-School Intervention for Preschoolers With Challenging Behaviors: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Preschool First Step to Success.

Edward G. Feil, Andy Frey, Hill M. Walker, Jason W. Small, John R. Seeley, Annemieke Golly, and Steven R. Forness

Preliminary Development of the Parent Involvement in Early Learning Scale for Low-Income Families Enrolled in a Child-Development-Focused Home Visiting Program.

Patricia H. Manz, Amanda L. Gernhart, Catherine B. Bracaliello, Vanessa J. Pressimone, and Rachel A. Eisenberg

Using Rasch Rating Scale Methodology to Examine a Behavioral Screener for Preschoolers At Risk.

Christine DiStefano, Fred W. Greer, R. W. Kamphaus, and William H. Brown

Item-Based Psychometrics of the Preschool Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale.

Cynthia J. Cress, Matthew C. Lambert, and Michael H. Epstein

Measuring the Quality of Inclusive Practices: Findings From the Inclusive Classroom Profile Pilot.

Elena P. Soukakou, Pam J. Winton, Tracey A. West, John H. Sideris, and Lia M. Rucker

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

20. Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program - Report to Congress

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation - Retrieved March 13, 2015

A recently published report, The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation: Early Findings on the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) - A Report to Congress (2015), provides information on early results from the federally required evaluation of the MIECHV program. Some key findings include:

  • States used initial MIECHV funds primarily to expand the use of four evidence-based home visiting models in at-risk communities.
  • MIECHV-funded programs serve a group of mothers with many needs: more than 30% had symptoms of depression when they entered the study, almost 20% had health problems that limited their activities, 92% were receiving public assistance, and more than 75% had no more than a high school diploma.
  • MIECHV-funded programs are designed to help parents support the healthy development of infants and toddlers and overcome the problems low income families face.

21. Report Highlights Successes of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

Source: CLASP - February 11, 2015

CLASP has published a new report highlighting how funding from the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program has helped to expand home visiting services to vulnerable families - including in hard-to-reach rural areas and tribal communities. Based on interviews with 20 states and 2 tribal organizations, An Investment in Our Future: How Federal Home Visiting Funding Provides Critical Support for Parents and Children, (February 2015) shows how federal MIECHV funding is being used to expand home visiting services while also building the infrastructure to support well-coordinated and effective home visiting programs. It was written in collaboration with the Center for American Progress.

22. New Report on How Smart Investments Build Strong Systems for Young Children

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - November 24, 2014

In 2010 Congress established the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) to support states and tribal entities in providing voluntary, evidence-based, home visiting services to at-risk families. A new report from the ZERO TO THREE Policy Center, The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Smart Investments Build Strong Systems for Young Children (2014), looks at how the MIECHV program is contributing to state efforts to build high-quality, comprehensive statewide early childhood systems.

23. Study Looks at Variation in Effectiveness Across Head Start Centers

Source: National Bureau of Economic Research - Retrieved November 14, 2014

A new report from the National Bureau of Economic Research examines the variation in effectiveness across Head Start childcare centers and finds that offering full-day services and frequent home visiting are the two factors that contribute the most to highly effective Head Start centers. Other key inputs, such as curriculum, teacher education, and class size, were not associated with increased effectiveness. The study used data from the Head Start Impact Study. To learn more, see Inputs in the Production of Early Childhood Human Capital: Evidence from Head Start (October 2014 - NBER Working Paper 20639).

24. Designing a Home Visiting Framework for Families in Public and Mixed-Income Communities

Source: Urban Institute - October 30, 2014

Young children in public and mixed-income housing frequently are exposed to deep poverty and developmental and educational risks, yet home visiting programs that could help these vulnerable families are often not designed to fully address their unique needs. A new brief from the Urban Institute, Designing a Home Visiting Framework for Families in Public and Mixed-Income Communities (October 2014) presents key issues that program planners and early childhood leaders should consider when designing appropriate and responsive home visiting programs for young children and families in these communities.

25. Tribal Home Visiting Programs: Review of the Evidence

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - October 21. 2014

The Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) initiative was launched in 2009 to identify home visiting models that meet the criteria of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) for an evidence-based early childhood home visiting service delivery model. A newly updated report describes the findings from a recent review that was done to assess the evidence of effectiveness of culturally relevant home visiting models that have been implemented in tribal communities or evaluated with American Indian and Alaska Native families and children.

26. The Strengthening Families Approach and Protective Factors Framework: Branching Out and Reaching Deeper

Source: Center for the Study of Social Policy - October 6, 2014

In 2003, the Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) introduced its Strengthening Families Approach and Protective Factors Framework as a research informed, strengths-based initiative for strengthening the ability of parents and communities to care for their children in ways that promote well-being and prevent abuse and neglect. Since that time, more than 30 states have implemented initiatives to integrate the approach into early childhood programs, health care and human services systems (e.g., child welfare), public policy (e.g., Quality Rating and Improvement Systems), and early intervention programs (e.g., home visiting). A new CSSP report, The Strengthening Families Approach and Protective Factors Framework: Branching Out and Reaching Deeper (September 2014), provides an updated synthesis of the research and the foundational ideas that inform the evidence base of the approach and discusses its broad and diverse implementation in policy and practice across the United States.

27. Updated! Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness Review: Executive Summary

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - Retrieved August 8, 2014

Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) was launched in 2009 to identify home visiting models that meet the criteria of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) for an evidence-based early childhood home visiting service delivery model. A recently updated paper, Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness Review: Executive Summary (September 2013 - revised June 2014), provides an overview of the HomVEE review process, a synopsis of the review results, and information about 14 evidence-based program models that have been identified. The updated executive summary also identifies 21 models that did not meet the DHHS criteria for being evidence-based and discusses gaps in the existing research literature on home visiting models that limit its usefulness for matching program models to community needs. It was published by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

28. Treating Maternal Depression in Home Visiting - Opportunities for States

Source: Every Child Succeeds - Retrieved August 8, 2014

High rates of maternal depression have been found among new mothers served by home visiting programs; and for women living in poverty and women of color, depression often goes untreated. A new brief, Moving Beyond Depression: An Effective Program to Treat Maternal Depression in Home Visiting - Opportunities for States (July 2014), discusses the impacts of maternal depression on young children and families and provides research findings from Moving Beyond Depression, a comprehensive approach to identifying and treating depression among mothers voluntarily participating in home visiting programs. The brief was published by Every Child Succeeds, a division of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

29. How Early Learning Challenge States Can Meet the Needs of Infants and Toddlers

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - June 10, 2014

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center recently released Meeting the Challenge: How the Newest Early Learning Challenge Grantees Can Meet the Needs of Infants and Toddlers (May 2014), which explores six strategies the most recent Early Learning Challenge (ELC) grant recipients (Georgia, Kentucky, Michigan, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Vermont) are using that have the potential to improve outcomes for infants and toddlers. These strategies include: developing and integrating Early Learning Guidelines for infants and toddlers; professional development of the infant-toddler workforce; expansion of home visiting; building capacity in high-need communities; engaging and supporting families; and connecting families to appropriate services.

30. Home Visiting Programs: Reviewing Evidence of Effectiveness

Source: Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness Project - Retrieved April 24, 2014

The Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) Project was created to identify home visiting models that meet the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' criteria for an evidence-based early childhood home visiting service delivery model. It is meant to assist states participating in Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program, which requires that 75 percent of grant funding be spent on program models that are proven to be effective. A new brief, Home Visiting Programs: Reviewing Evidence of Effectiveness - OPRE Report #2014-13 (March 2014), provides a three-page summary describing the review process, review results, and the 14 program models that have been identified to date.

31. The Potential for Cost Savings from Home Visiting Due to Reductions in Child Maltreatment

Source: Casey Family Programs - Retrieved April 24, 2014

A new brief, Home Visiting: The Potential for Cost Savings from Home Visiting Due to Reductions in Child Maltreatment (2014), describes the evidence of effectiveness of several home-visiting program models in reducing child maltreatment and presents the estimated costs of implementing these models. The brief focuses on four program models - Healthy Families America (HFA), Nurse Family Partnership (NFP), Parents as Teachers (PAT), and SafeCare. Agencies implementing these models were part of a recent study of home-visiting costs conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, with support from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and in partnership with Casey Family Programs.

32. The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start: First Annual Report

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - January 3, 2014

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation has published The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start: First Annual Report (OPRE Report 2013-54, December 2013), which describes a study that has been designed to examine the effects of two home visiting models - Healthy Families America (HFA) and Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) - on birth outcomes and maternal and infant health and health care. The study will use a rigorous random assignment design. It will also collect and analyze information on local implementation processes. The study was developed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), funded by CMS, and implemented in partnership with the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).

33. National Scan of State Policies Shows Increasing Emphasis on Early Education in 2013

Source: Education Commission of the States - December 2, 2013

The Education Commission of the States (ECS) has published a new report, 2013 Legislative Session - P-3 Policies (November 2013), by Emily Workman, which looks at the work states across the country are doing to strengthen their early childhood systems. Using the results of a national scan of enacted policies from the 2013 legislative sessions, the report finds that state policymakers are increasingly recognizing the benefits of early learning and developmental services for young children. It highlights ways in which they are strengthening their early childhood systems in areas such as governance, funding, program access, family engagement, teacher preparation/certification, assessment, Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS), Home Visiting and more.

34. Supplement Provides Information about Home Visiting Programs and Early Childhood

Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved November 22, 2013

A supplement to the November 2013 issue of Pediatrics is dedicated to the topic of home visiting and early childhood. Articles address topics such as the effectiveness of home visiting in improving child health and reducing child maltreatment, improving nurse-family partnerships, maternal depression, home visiting in partnership with pediatric care, a cell phone-enhanced home visiting parenting intervention, integrating home visiting into medical care of infants born to young mothers, and enhancing home visiting with mental health consultation. The supplement was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics and sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Administration for Children and Families.

35. Bipartisan Proposal to Expand Access to High-Quality Early Education Programs

Source: U.S. Department of Education - November 13, 2013

On November 13, 2013 Sen. Harkin (D-IA), Rep. Miller (D-CA), and Rep. Hanna (R-NY) unveiled a bipartisan proposal that would expand high-quality, early-childhood education for children from birth to age five. Watch a 5:26 minute video of the announcement. The proposal focuses on four key areas:

  1. Establishing federal-state partnerships to provide high-quality preschool to low and moderate income families;
  2. Increasing the quality of infant and toddler care in center-based and family child care settings;
  3. Supporting quality improvements in the Child Care and Development Block Grant; and
  4. Encouraging continued support for the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting program.

Read a summary of the Strong Start for America's Children Act of 2013 here. See also, the House Bill and the Senate Bill.

36. Early Care and Education State Budget Actions FY 2013

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures - August 1, 2013

The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) has published new findings from a survey of 21 state legislative fiscal offices on their FY 2013 state appropriations for early care and education programs (child care, prekindergarten, home visiting and other related programs). Some key findings show that overall, state appropriations to early care and education increased slightly compared to FY 2012, child care reductions were less pronounced compared to previous years, prekindergarten continued to rebound with fewer severe reductions, and home visiting budgets expanded by combining federal and state resources.

37. Libby Doggett to Be Appointed New Early Learning Deputy Assistant Secretary

Source: U.S. Department of Education - July 30, 2013

In a July 30, 2013 Bulletin, the U.S. Department of Education announced that Dr. Libby Doggett will be named Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Early Learning. She will lead the Office of Early Learning within the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE), which jointly administers the Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) program with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Doggett recently directed the Pew Home Visiting Campaign, which promotes effective state policies and investments in quality, home-based programs for vulnerable new and expectant families. Prior to that, she directed Pre-K Now, Pew's 10-year campaign to advance high-quality, voluntary preschool throughout the country.

38. 2014 Budget Proposal Includes Significant Investments in Early Childhood Education

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Early Learning - April 10, 2013

On April 10, 2013, President Obama sent his fiscal year 2014 budget request to Congress. The budget request includes an historic new investment, Preschool for All ($75 billion over 10 years), which would make preschool available to all 4-year olds from low- and moderate-income families. It also includes funding to increase or maintain key investments in a number of other programs that seek to improve outcomes for young children, especially for those with high needs, including:

  • Preschool Development Grants ($750 million)
  • Early Intervention Programs for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities ($463 million).
  • Preschool Grants for Children with Disabilities ($373 million)
  • Head Start ($9.6 billion).
  • Early Head Start - Child Care Partnerships ($1.4 billion).
  • Child Care and Development Fund ($5.8 billion).
  • Voluntary home visiting services ($15 billion over 10 years).
  • A new Child Care Quality Initiative ($200 million).

To learn more, see the U.S. Department of Education's Investing in Early Learning budget document. The President's proposal is just one step in the annual appropriations process. Congress will decide on final funding levels during the upcoming year as it develops annual appropriations bills in the House and Senate.

39. Fact Sheet: President Obama's Plan for Early Education for all Americans

Source: The White House - February 13, 2013

On February 13, 2013, the White House released a fact sheet providing information on President Obama's plan to significantly expand access to preschool for all 4-year-olds from moderate- and low-income families. The plan proposes that the federal government provide matching dollars to states to provide public preschool for four-year olds whose families earn up to 200 percent of the poverty level, as well as extra funds to expand public pre-kindergarten programs for middle-class families who could pay tuition on a sliding scale. The plan includes an emphasis on high quality programs, to ensure they provide the greatest benefit for children. It also proposes expanding Early Head Start and the Maternal Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting program for infants and toddlers. See Fact Sheet: President Obama's Plan for Early Education for all Americans.

On February 14, 2013, the President spoke about his plan in Decatur, GA, explaining why he believes high-quality preschool is the best bang for our education bucks.

40. Twelve New Reports of Home Visiting Research Available

Source: Pew Home Visiting Campaign - Retrieved February 8, 2013

The Pew Home Visiting Campaign recently published 12 new reports of home visiting research. The reports highlight those program elements that are essential to success, ways to improve existing models, and factors to consider in tailoring home visiting to local contexts and particular target populations. These studies underscore the need for continued evaluation and monitoring of home visiting services in order to maximize effectiveness as programs expand to serve more families in a greater diversity of settings. The full reports and executive summaries are available online.

41. Bringing the Pyramid Model into Homes - Webinar Recording and Materials Available

Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - October 25, 2012

On October 10, 2012, the Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI) hosted a webinar on implementing the Pyramid Model with families of infants and toddlers in their homes. Erin Barton and Regina (Mel) Woodcock used a question and answer format to describe how West Virginia implemented the Pyramid Model across multiple home visiting programs, including within the Part C system. The Webinar recording and materials are now freely available online.

42. Early Childhood Education Resources from the Harvard Family Research Project

Source: Harvard Family Research Project - August 7, 2012

The Harvard Family Research Project has launched a new early childhood section on their Web site devoted to parent, family, and community engagement (PFCE) in early childhood education. Resources are organized by the following categories:

  • Areas of Practice (program environment, transitions, engaging families as teachers, home visiting, educator-family relationships, community partnerships)
  • Program Foundations (professional development, program leadership, evaluation and continuous improvement)
  • Building Capacity for Quality Programs (improving outreach and communication, informing policy and grantmaking)

The resources in each group highlight strategies for promoting positive outcomes for children and families.

43. Three Additional Home Visiting Models Meet MIECHV Evidence-Based Criteria

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - July 20, 2012

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently announced that three additional models meet their criteria for evidence-based home visiting. These include Early Start (New Zealand), the Oklahoma Community-Based Family Resource and Support Program, and Play and Learning Strategies (PALS) Infant. At least 75 percent of a state's federal grant from the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program must be invested in models that have reached this bar. The three new model short reports are available online. To learn more, see the HHS Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness Web site.

44. Medicaid Financing of Early Childhood Home Visiting Programs

Source: Pew Charitable Trusts and the National Academy for State Health Policy - Retrieved June 28, 2012

The Pew Charitable Trusts and the National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) have published a new report, Medicaid Financing of Early Childhood Home Visiting Programs: Options, Opportunities, and Challenges (June 2012), which looks at how states are using, or could use, Medicaid to finance home visiting services. The report and its recommendations are based on a literature review and a scan of state policies and practices nationwide to identify mechanisms for supporting home visiting services through Medicaid, as well as input from an expert meeting at which state and federal government representatives and national home visiting experts discussed the benefits and challenges of different Medicaid funding mechanisms.

45. Toolkit for Planning Home Visiting Partnerships with Family, Friend, and Neighbor Caregivers

Source: CLASP - Retrieved June 8, 2012

CLASP has released a new toolkit, Home Away From Home: A Toolkit for Planning Home Visiting Partnerships with Family, Friend, and Neighbor Caregivers (June 2012), which provides strategies to help states develop partnerships between home visiting and Family, Friend, and Neighbor (FFN) caregivers. The toolkit includes:

  • Background on home visiting partnerships and information on available home visiting models and their potential for use in partnership with FFN;
  • A planning guide for states to explore home visiting partnerships, including potential policy changes; and
  • Case studies of existing partnerships between home visiting models and FFN providers. Each case study includes information about the model used, professional development and workforce implications, implementation, challenges, and any available evaluation results.

46. A Guide to Effective Consultation with Settings Serving Infants, Toddlers, and their Families

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families - Retrieved February 27, 2012

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families (ACF) recently published A Guide to Effective Consultation with Settings Serving Infants, Toddlers, and their Families (December 2011). The Guide defines core knowledge, competencies, and dispositions for consultants working with early care and education programs and settings serving infants, toddlers, and their families, including but not limited to: center-based child care; family child care; Early Head Start (EHS); family, friend, and neighbor care; Part C early intervention, home visiting and early childhood mental health. The development of the guide was a joint effort between the Office of Child Care and the National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initiative.

47. ZERO TO THREE Releases Application for State Policy Action Team Meeting

Source: ZERO TO THREE - October 24, 2011

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center, supported by the Birth to Five Policy Alliance, is soliciting applications for participation in a state policy action team meeting designed to support states and territories with the intentional integration of quality home visiting services in their early childhood systems. Five states/territories will be selected to send teams of 4-5 people to attend the meeting, which will be held in April or May 2012. Interested states and territories must submit a single application by November 22, 2011. For more information about the meeting and the application process download the request for applications at http://main.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/RFA.pdf?docID=12801&JServSessionIda004=dk7xejcyn1.app212c

48. New Report Evaluates States' Spending on Home Visiting Programs

Source: Pew Center on the States' Home Visiting Campaign - August 24, 2011

On August 24, 2011, the Pew Center on the States' Home Visiting Campaign released a 50-state report on funding for voluntary home visiting programs. States and the New Federal Home Visiting Program: An Assessment from the Starting Line (August 2011) looks at the extent to which each state is supporting evidence-based program models and how well each is tracking whether public expenditures are resulting in improved outcomes. The report also provides a roadmap for policy makers interested in making strategic investments in programs that help strengthen families. To learn more and to access the full report, go to http://www.pewstates.org/research/data-visualizations/home-visiting-inventory-interactive-85899372712

49. Early Head Start (EHS) Home-Based Model Resources Available

Source: Office of Head Start - July 14, 2011

The Office of Head Start recently launched a Web page with information on the Early Head Start (EHS) Home-Based Model, which is one of 8 evidence-based home visiting models selected for the Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program. The Web page includes an overview of the EHS Home-Based Model, a video entitled Head Start Beginning at Home, and resources for implementing the model. It is available at http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/ehsnrc/Early%20Head%20Start/home-based-model

50. Early Care and Education State Budget Actions FY 2011

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures - Retrieved July 5, 2011

The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) recently released Early Care and Education State Budget Actions FY 2011, which is based on data compiled from an annual survey of state fiscal decisions in early care and education policy and programs, including child care, prekindergarten, home visiting and other related early childhood programs. Findings show that state appropriations from FY 2010 to FY 2011 were generally stable, with increases to prekindergarten, home visiting and other early childhood initiatives and a 2 percent decrease to child care. To learn more, go to http://www.ncsl.org/issues-research/human-services/early-care-and-education-state-budget-actions-fy20.aspx3. Highlights from the report are available at http://www.ncsl.org/documents/cyf/earlycareed2011budgetactions.pdf

51. Home Visiting Community Planning Tool from ZERO TO THREE

Source: ZERO TO THREE - Retrieved April 29, 2011

ZERO TO THREE has released a new tool to help communities use data to identify their strengths, needs, and gaps in current home visiting services; choose an evidence-based program model; and align work at the local level with state efforts. The new Home Visiting Community Planning Tool is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/public-policy/state-community-policy/professional-resources.html

52. Evidence-Based Home Visiting Briefs

Source: Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall - Retrieved April 1, 2011

Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago are producing a series of briefs about home visiting, using information from grantees funded by the Children's Bureau to implement one of five evidence-based home visiting models. These briefs and other related reports can be accessed online at http://supportingebhv.org/crossite. Recent briefs include:
- Supporting Home Visitors in Evidence-Based Programs
- Recruiting and Training Home Visitors for Evidence-Based Home Visiting
- Assessing the Need for Evidence-Based Home Visiting
- Replicating Evidence-Based Home Visiting Models: A Framework for Assessing Fidelity

53. New Home Visiting Brief from NGA Center for Best Practices

Source: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices - March 8, 2011

The National Governors Association (NGA) Center for Best Practices has published a new issue brief, Maximizing the Impact of State Early Childhood Home Visitation Programs (2011) that looks at how governors can better integrate home visiting programs into effective, comprehensive state early childhood systems. Strategies include: promoting shared accountability across state agencies, developing research-based quality standards and improving data linkages to track outcomes and better target services. It is available online at http://www.nga.org/files/live/sites/NGA/files/pdf/1103HOMEVISIT.PDF

54. New Briefs on Improving the Lives of Young Children from the Urban Institute

Source: Urban Institute - March 17, 2011

The Urban Institute recently published the following new briefs related to improving the lives of young children:

55. State Early Care and Education Public Policy Developments for Fiscal Year 2011

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children - Retrieved March 14, 2011

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) has published a report that provides a recap of public policy developments in states for Fiscal Year 2011 in a number of early childhood areas, including for example: State Early Childhood Advisory Councils, Governance, Professional Development, Data Systems, Quality Rating and Improvement Systems, Child Care Subsidies and Regulations, Developmental Screenings, Early Intervention, Autism, Early Childhood Mental Health, Home Visiting and more. It is available online at http://www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/file/policy/state/State%20ECE%20Public%20Policy%20Developments%202_11_2.pdf

56. Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) 2011 Call for Studies

Source: Mathematica Policy Research - March 2, 2011

Mathematica Policy Research® is seeking studies for a comprehensive review of the evidence base for home visiting programs. The review is being conducted for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) by Mathematica (and subcontractor Dr. Brenda Jones Harden). It will be used to help inform the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, which emphasizes and supports successful implementation of high-quality home visiting programs that have demonstrated evidence of effectiveness. The 2011 call for studies will continue and update an existing evidence review, conducted over the past year. The results of the initial review, as well as information about review standards, are available at http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/. To learn more about the 2011 call for studies, go to http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/SpecReport.aspx#CallForStudies. For questions, please contact Luke Heinkel at lheinkel@mathematica-mpr.com or (609) 945-3368. Submissions are due by April 15, 2010.

57. New CONNECT Module on Family-Professional Partnerships

Source: CONNECT: The Center to Mobilize Early Childhood Knowledge - November 23, 2010

CONNECT: The Center to Mobilize Early Childhood Knowledge recently released CONNECT Module 4: Family-Professional Partnerships, which focuses on effective practices for developing trusting family-professional partnerships in early care and education programs (including home visiting, early intervention and other 0-3 settings). CONNECT Modules are free and use an evidence-based approach to professional development. They include video clips, activities, and handouts that are designed to be embedded into existing curricula, coursework and other professional development opportunities. All of the modules are available at http://community.fpg.unc.edu/connect-modules

58. State-by-State and National Snapshot of Home Visiting Programs, Models and Funding

Source: Pew Charitable Trusts - Retrieved November 1, 2010

The Pew Center on the States recently conducted surveys with state agency leaders across the country and developed the Pew Inventory of State Home Visiting Programs to provide state leaders, agency administrators and program directors with a state-by-state and national snapshot of home visiting programs, models and funding. It is available online at http://www.pewcenteronthestates.org/initiatives_detail.aspx?initiativeID=61051

59. What Works for Home Visiting Programs

Source: Child Trends - July 27, 2010

Home visiting programs often offer a combination of supports, interventions and services to young children and their families. A new fact sheet from Child Trends, entitled What Works for Home Visiting Programs: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions (July 2010), by Jordan Kahn and Kristin A. Moore, summarizes the findings from 66 rigorous evaluations of programs that have a home visiting component. Overall, 32 of the programs had positive impacts on at least one child outcome, 23 had mixed reviews, and 11 were not proven to work. The fact sheet is available online at http://www.childtrends.org/Files//Child_Trends-2010_7_1_FS_WWHomeVisitpdf.pdf

60. New Guide on Applying for Home Visiting Grants

Source: Child Trends - July 1, 2010

Child Trends has published a new guide to help states apply for federal home visiting grants. Home Visiting Application Process: A Guide for Planning State Needs Assessments outlines what needs to be done to complete the grant application process and provides data useful to applicants conducting needs assessments, identifying high-risk populations, and selecting and measuring benchmarks. It also offers strategies for planning a new program. To learn more, go to http://www.childtrends.org/Files//Child_Trends-2010_06_30_Home_Visiting_Guide.pdf

61. Funding Opportunity for the Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - June 24, 2010

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Children and Families (ACF) and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) are now accepting applications for the FY 2010 Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Grant Program. The Program will support the implementation of high-quality, culturally-relevant home visiting programs that have demonstrated evidence of effectiveness in Tribal settings. Applications are by 4:30 pm EST on July 26, 2010. To learn more and to access the full announcement, go to http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/open/foa/view/HHS-2010-ACF-OFA-TH-0134

62. Funding Opportunity for the New Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - June 10, 2010

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the Administration on Children and Families (ACF) have announced the first Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for the new Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, created as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. Approximately $90 million will be awarded this summer to fund the new grant program for eligible States and territories to provide evidence-based home visiting programs for children and families in at risk communities. The application deadline is July 09, 2010.

See the announcement at http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/fh/mch/fhv/fedmiec.html
See also, http://www.nectac.org/~docs/eNotes/FOA1_ Home_visiting.doc

63. Early Care and Education State Budget Actions FY 2010

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures - May 28, 2010

The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) recently published Early Care and Education State Budget Actions FY 2010 (May 2010), an annual survey of state fiscal decisions in early care and education policy and programs, including child care, prekindergarten, home visiting and other related early childhood programs. To learn more, go to http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=20417

64. Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program - Introductory Materials Available

Source: HRSA and ACF - May 7, 2010

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the Administration on Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently released introductory materials related to the new Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, which was created as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act earlier this year. HRSA and ACF will be partnering with the States and other interested parties to develop an effective and well-coordinated program to promote early childhood health and development and improve outcomes and opportunities for children and families. To learn more, see http://www.nectac.org/~docs/enotes/home_visiting.doc

65. New Child Care and Early Education Resources from CLASP

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - April 29, 2010

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) has recently posted new resources on the following early childhood topics online:

66. Pew Launches State Home Visiting Campaigns in Four States

Source: Pew Center on the States - April 6, 2010

On April 6, 2010, the Pew Center on the States and its partners announced a targeted $5.6 million campaign to promote smart state investments in evidence-based, voluntary home visiting programs for new and expectant families. This year, the campaign will support statewide advocacy and public education efforts in Louisiana, North Carolina, Ohio and Washington. To see the full press release, go to http://www.pewcenteronthestates.org/news_room_detail.aspx?id=58313

To learn more about the Pew Home Visiting Campaign, go to http://www.pewcenteronthestates.org/initiatives_detail.aspx?initiativeID=52756.

67. The Costs of Disinvestment: Why States Can't Afford to Cut Smart Early Childhood Programs

Source: Partnership for America's Economic Success - January 19, 2010

The Partnership for America's Economic Success has issued a new issue brief entitled The Costs of Disinvestment: Why States Can't Afford to Cut Smart Early Childhood Programs (January 2010), which argues that states can save money and stimulate their economies by protecting funding for effective pre-kindergarten and home visiting programs. The brief presents evidence showing that investing in early childhood programs is fundamental to achieving a globally competitive workforce and fiscal sustainability for states and the nation. It is available online at http://www.pewtrusts.org/our_work_report_detail.aspx?id=56874&category=10

68. New Resource Brief on Home Visiting

Source: MCH Alert - July 31, 2009

Home visitation programs offer family-centered services to pregnant mothers and families with infants and young children. A new resource brief from the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Library at Georgetown University contains a collection of resources about home visitation programs, including: an overview of the home visitation component of the president's FY 2010 budget proposal; testimonies and policy statements; research findings; state and local program guidelines; documents on program development, core competencies, supervision, and evaluation; curricula and training; and Webinars. Home Visiting: Resource Brief (2009) is available at http://mchlibrary.info/guides/homevisiting.html

69. New Report on Strengthening State-based Home Visiting Programs through State Leadership

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - March 5, 2009

A new report from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), entitled State-based Home Visiting: Strengthening Programs through State Leadership, by Kay Johnson, describes the results of a survey and a roundtable discussion about state-based home visiting programs. It is meant to help inform the field about the following two questions:

(1) Are states investing in home visiting in ways that promote improved outcomes for young children?
(2) How, in this context, do they meet the needs of those facing the greatest social and developmental risks?

It is available online at http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_862.html

70. New Early Childhood Reports from the National Conference of State Legislatures

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures - Retrieved July 16, 2008

The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) has published the following two new reports:

71. Early Care and Education Legislation Database

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures - April 22, 2008

The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) has developed an Early Care and Education Legislation Database, which tracks early care and education legislation from the 2008 session. Issues include child care and child care financing, early childhood services, prekindergarten, professional development, home visiting, infants and toddlers, and financing early education. The database is updated biweekly and can be searched by state, topic, status, primary sponsor, bill number or keyword. It is available at http://www.ncsl.org/programs/cyf/ECELD.cfm

72. Early Intervention and Recovery Among Children With Failure to Thrive: Follow-up at Age 8

Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved July 23, 2007

The results of a study examining the impact of early intervention provided to infants with failure to thrive on growth, academic/cognitive performance, and home/classroom behavior at age 8 was published in the July issue of Pediatrics. Findings demonstrated that clinical intervention and home visiting programs lessoned some of the negative effects of failure to thrive. An abstract with more information is available online at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/120/1/59?etoc

Article citation: Black MM, Dubowitz H, Krishnakumar A, et al. 2007. Early intervention and recovery among children with Failure to Thrive: Follow-up at age 8. Pediatrics, 120(1):59-69.

73. Population Served May Explain Home Visiting Results

Source: Children's Bureau - September 1, 2006

A recent evaluation of the Healthy Families New York (HFNY) home visiting program offers a possible explanation for some of the discrepant findings from home visiting programs around the country. While randomized trials of programs involving home visits by nurses have demonstrated positive effects for reducing child maltreatment, randomized trials of paraprofessional home visitation programs have found little effect on child maltreatment. The HFNY study suggests that the differential impact of home visiting programs on parenting outcomes may be due to characteristics of the parent populations served by each program. To read more and to view the pdf go to http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewSection&issueID=77&sectionID=17

74. New Issue Brief - Bringing Home Better Birth Outcomes

Source: ASTHO - Retrieved July 7, 2006

Bringing Home Better Birth Outcomes -- This brief, published by the Association of State and Territorial Health Officers (ASTHO) with support from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, examines home visiting as a strategy used by state health agencies to improve birth outcomes among MCH populations. It includes an overview of home visiting programs; a discussion of goals, target populations, common service components, outcomes, and financing of state-level programs; and examples of programs from four states and one territory. Available at http://www.astho.org/pubs/HomeVisitingBriefFinal.pdf [Note: Link checked on 5/6/2009 - this document is no longer available online.]

75. Early Head Start Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot

Source: Mathematica Policy Research - April 28, 2006

The Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project, funded by the Head Start Bureau in 2004, supports the quality of care that kith and kin caregivers provide to infants and toddlers enrolled in home-based Early Head Start programs. This brief by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. describes the early implementation experiences of the pilot projects. It is based on visits to sites after one year of operation, as well as information on the characteristics of enrolled children, families, and caregivers. It is available online at http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/pdfs/kithkinisbr.pdf

76. Evaluation of the Early Head Start Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project - Request for Comments

Source: Federal Register - December 17, 2004 (Volume 69, Number 242)

Comments are requested on the proposed evaluation of the Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project. The goal of this pilot project is to develop program models for supporting relatives and neighbors who care for Early Head Start children in acquiring the knowledge, skills and resources they need to support children's healthy development.

The Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project evaluation will collect and disseminate information about the program models and service delivery strategies developed by the pilot sites, as well as the characteristics and needs of participating children, families, and caregivers. The evaluation will collect and analyze information from three main sources: (1) Interviews with staff and focus groups with parents and caregivers, (2) a program recordkeeping system for tracking services to be maintained by the pilot sites, and (3) observational assessments of the quality of the caregiving environment and the interactions between children and caregivers.

Comments are requested within 60 days. For complete information go to http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2004/04-27583.htm

77. Twenty-four Programs Funded for Enhanced Home Visiting Project (EHVP)

Source: Head Start News - April 21, 2004

The Enhanced Home Visiting Project recently invited Early Head Start and Migrant Infant/Toddler programs to apply for funding to develop and implement an enhanced home visiting program to serve children who are in "kith and kin" settings. Information about the Enhanced Home Visiting Project and recently funded programs is available at http://www.ehsnrc.org/highlights/EHVP.htm.

78. National Home Visiting Program Releases Outcome Data

Source: MCH Alert - November 22, 2002

The Healthy Families America Research Folder highlights the accomplishments of this national home visiting program over its 10-year history and provides evidence of the program's effectiveness. Healthy Families America compiled over 20 evaluations of home visiting programs.  The research folder comprises 10 one-page fact sheets on the effectiveness of home visiting
services in (1) reducing child maltreatment, (2) ensuring healthy child development, (3) promoting school readiness, and (4) promoting self-sufficiency and positive parenting. The research folder is intended to help advocates make the case for voluntary home visitation services. More information is available at
http://www.healthyfamiliesamerica.org/publications/index.html#research_folderl.

[Originally published in MCHAlert © 2002 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center

  • CB 8040
  • Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040
  • phone: 919.962.2001
  • fax: 919.966.7463
  • email: ectacenter@unc.edu

ECTA Center is a program of the FPG Child Development Institute of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, funded through cooperative agreement number H326P170001 from the Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent the Department of Education's position or policy.

Project Officer: Julia Martin Eile

  • UNC Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute
  • IDEAs that Work: Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education