Response to Intervention

eNotes search results for 'response to intervention or RTI'. Please note that links in past issues of eNotes may become inactive over time. If you are looking for an item that has an inactive link, please contact Sonya Detwiler for assistance.

1. Head Start Resources Supporting Individualization

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services

Head Start's Children with Disabilities webpage provides a compilation of resources for supporting individualization for children ages birth to 5. The evidence-based resources align with the 8 Division for Early Childhood (DEC) Recommended Practices' topic areas (Assessment, Environment, Family, Interaction, Instruction, Teaming and Collaboration, Transition, and Leadership) and are organized by knowledge level for educators and families.

2. Evaluation of Preschool Special Education Practices (EPSEP)

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES)

An extensive pilot study of an intervention program for children served in inclusive preschool classrooms is underway, and last week (January 11, 2018), Mathematica Policy Research released a request for proposals (RFP) to participate. The Evaluation of Preschool Special Education Practices (EPSEP) study, administered by Mathematica, the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, and the University of Florida on behalf of the US Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, seeks evidence of the impact of a preschool inclusive curriculum with targeted instructional supports for children with disabilities on language, literacy, and/or social-emotional behavioral skill development.

The pilot study will take place during the 2019-2020 school year, with possible consideration of a second year of implementation (2020-2021). RFP submissions are due February 26, 2018.

3. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - Volume 39, Issue 4, December 2017

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/JEI/current

Identifying Head Start Children for Higher Tiers of Language and Literacy Instruction

Kizzy Albritton, Adrienne Stuckey, Nicole Patton Terry

Evaluation of a LENA-Based Online Intervention for Parents of Young Children

Jill Gilkerson, Jeffrey A. Richards, Keith Topping

Parental Homework Completion and Treatment Knowledge during Group Parent–Child Interaction Therapy

Rosmary Ros, Paulo A. Graziano, Katie C. Hart

An Evaluation of the Research Evidence on the Early Start Denver Model

Erika M. Baril, Betsy P. Humphreys

Using Visual Activity Schedules for Young Children with Challenging Behavior

Kathleen N. Zimmerman, Jennifer R. Ledford, Erin E. Barton

Early Intervention Paraprofessional Standards: Development and Field Validation

Rashida Banerjee, Ritu V. Chopra, Geraldine DiPalma

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

4. Taking on the Challenge: Building a Strong Foundation for Early Learning

Source: Early Learning Challenge Technical Assistance (ELCTA)

ELCTA released Taking on the Challenge: Building a Strong Foundation for Early Learning (December 2017), a summary of the Early Learning Challenge (ELC) Program grantees' progress since it began in 2012. The major focus areas covered are coordinated state systems, Quality Rating and Improvement Systems, supporting the early childhood workforce, enhancing data systems, family engagement, strengthening local and community initiatives, and measuring progress. An executive summary and state profiles are included.

5. State of Early Learning in ESSA: Plans and Opportunities for Implementation

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO)

CEELO has released a new policy brief (December 2017) that focuses on key areas for supporting early learning in ESSA. Learn what other state education agencies are doing to promote early learning (birth through third grade) in their ESSA plans, and link to evidence based resources in this brief.

6. Supporting Child Development and Improving Family Economic Security

Source: Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation (OPRE)

In November 2017, OPRE released this report that investigates the design and evaluation of approaches that alleviate poverty by addressing the needs of low-income parents and children. Programs that combine services intended to support both child development and parental economic security were examined. Recent advances in implementation science and other fields of research provide key insights for new programs that may prove more effective than similar programs designed in the 1980s and 1990s.

7. Supporting Kids With Autism

Source: Education Week

Education Week has produced a video with psychologist Laura Anthony from the Center of Autism Spectrum Disorders, Children's National Health System explaining ways that teachers can support young children with autism in the classroom. Also, meet "Julia", Sesame Street's newest muppet, depicting a 4 year old girl with autism interacting with classroom peers.

8. Parent Participation in Early Intervention

Source: Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR)

Parent involvement is key for making the necessary decisions about early intervention services for children. This list of resources for parents and early intervention providers recently compiled by CIPR (December 2017) offers information and strategies for supporting parent participation in developmental screening, identifying appropriate services to best meet the child's needs, and staying informed about your (parents') rights.

9. 2016 Head Start Fact Sheets - Now Available

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP)

CLASP analyzes data from the Head Start grantees' Program Information Report (PIR) and offers factsheets to help early childhood stakeholders better understand Head Start and its participants. The most recent factsheets (December 2017) feature 2016 national data for three types of Head Start programs: Head Start preschool, Early Head Start, and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start. CLASP can also run state-specific analysis of PIR data upon request. Contact Ruth Cosse for more information.

10. Administrative Data in Early Care and Education Research

Source: Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation (OPRE)

OPRE has provided a set of resources (November 2017) to assist and support state/territory child care administrators and their research partners to use administrative data to respond to policy related early care and education research questions. Research staff in state agencies may also benefit from these resources.

11. Interviews with Early Intervention Practitioners, Coaches, and Administrators (Videos)

Source: New Mexico Family Infant Toddler (FIT) Program

A series of 5 videos has been added to New Mexico's FIT FOCUS Video Library (November 2017) that include interviews with early intervention practitioners, coaches, and administrators who participated in the second cohort of the FIT FOCUS video project. The interviewees discuss the impact of using video to enhance early intervention services and supports professional development activities. This project is a component of New Mexico's Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge FOCUS Tiered Quality Rating and Improvement System. The videos can be found at: http://www.cdd.unm.edu/ecln/FIT/fit-focus-video-library.html

The FIT FOCUS Video Library is a project of New Mexico's Family Infant Toddler (FIT) Program and the Early Childhood Learning Network of the University of New Mexico's Center for Development and Disability.

12. Invitation to Comment: Data Collection for Annual State Application - Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

Source: U.S. Department of Education

The U.S. Department of Education is inviting comments on a proposed information collection request related to the annual state application under part B of the IDEA. The Department is interested in comments that help assess the impact of its information collection requirements and minimize the public's reporting burden. Comments must be received by December 27, 2017. To learn more, see the Federal Register Notice.

13. Invitation to Comment: State and Local Educational Agency Record and Reporting Requirements - Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

Source: U.S. Department of Education

The U.S. Department of Education is inviting comments on a proposed information collection request related to state and local educational agency record and reporting requirements under part B of the IDEA. The Department is interested in comments that help assess the impact of its information collection requirements and minimize the public's reporting burden. Comments must be received by December 27, 2017. To learn more, see the Federal Register Notice.

14. Converting COS Data to OSEP Progress Categories / Summary Statements

Source: The Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy)

For stakeholders interested in how child outcomes summary (COS) data is converted to the national data reported by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), check out DaSy's new Converting COS Data resource (November 2017). An overview video, COS calculator, and list of additional resources are also included.

15. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Source: The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM)

An article published by NEJM in December 2016 provides valuable information about neonatal abstinence syndrome, an opioid withdrawal syndrome that affects most newborns (55 to 94%) whose mothers were addicted to or treated with opioids during pregnancy. Some topics discussed are toxicologic testing and assessment tools for identifying infants at risk, supportive care, treatment, and long-term outcomes.

16. Supporting Diverse Children and Workers in Early Childhood Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS)

Source: Migration Policy Institute

The Migration Policy Institute issued a report in August 2017 that acknowledges the growing numbers of young children with immigrant parents - now more than 10% in a majority of states. The report offers states several strategies that can be used to safeguard QRIS are accessible, equitable, and culturally responsive to effectively serve dual language children and families. In addition, the report examines how 18% of the early care early education workforce are immigrants, and this population brings valuable skills to the field that can help bridge the cultural gap between home and school.

17. Thousands of Parents are Enrolling their Children in Online Preschool

Source: Hechinger Report

"Advocates say online preschool has the potential to address two serious problems with the current state of preschool: access and cost." However, experts like the American Academy of Pediatrics caution that extended media use for preschool children is harmful, causing poor executive functioning and impaired cognitive, language, motor, and social-emotional skills. A recent article from the Hechinger Report Early Education Series (November 2017) discusses this and the results of the UPSTART pilot program, an online kindergarten-readiness program, that several states have implemented. Currently, over 30 percent of Utah's 4-year-olds are using the program. UPSTART has also expanded into Idaho, Indiana, South Carolina, Ohio, and Philadelphia.

18. Early Childhood Program Participation (ECPP) - Survey Results

Source: National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences

The ECPP Survey collects data about children (ages 0 to 6) who are not yet enrolled in kindergarten and their participation in relative care, non-relative care, and center-based care programs. The survey also collects information from parents about the main reason for choosing care, what factors were important to parents when choosing a care arrangement, and parents' participation in various learning activities with their children. This report released by the National Center for Education Statistics in September 2017 presents a data analysis of the 2016 survey results.

19. Supporting Parents: How Six Decades of Parenting Research Can Inform Policy and Best Practice

Source: Society for Research in Child Development

According to a recent Social Policy Report, the U.S. lacks programs aimed to support at risk families and promote effective parenting, when compared to other developed nations. Learn what 60 years of research can teach us about the elements of competent parenting and policy recommendations for supporting at risk parents in this report.

20. Education Inequalities at the School Starting Gate

Source: Economic Policy Institute

The Economic Policy Institute has released a new report (September 2017) after reviewing data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and 12 case studies to measure performance gaps in children by social class. The findings suggest that performance gaps have continued at the same level over 2 generations, and economic crisis during this period could partially explain the lack of improvement. Policy recommendations are included at the end of the report encouraging "greater investments in pre-K programs and continued comprehensive support for children through their academic years, including meaningful engagement of parents and communities, if we are to substantially improve the odds for disadvantaged children."

21. Supporting Brain Development in Traumatized Children

Source: Children's Bureau, Child Welfare Information Gateway

This 2017 bulletin is a companion to Child Welfare Information Gateway's issue brief, Understanding the Effects of Maltreatment on Brain Development (posted in eNotes in June 2015). It is designed to help professionals understand the behavioral, emotional, and mental effects of early abuse and neglect in children, as well as available early intervention options.

22. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - Volume 39, Issue 3, September 2017

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/JEI/current

How Much Do Parents Think They Talk to Their Child?

Jeffrey A. Richards, Jill Gilkerson, Dongxin Xu, Keith Topping

Parents' Experiences Navigating Intervention Systems for Young Children With Mild Language Delays

Jennifer Marshall, Andrea Adelman, Stacey M. Kesten, Ruby A. Natale, Batya Elbaum

Beyond ASD: Evidence for the Effectiveness of Social Narratives

Kathleen N. Zimmerman, Jennifer R. Ledford

Internalizing Behaviors and Hyperactivity/Inattention: Consequences for Young Struggling Readers, and Especially Boys

Justin D. Garwood, Cheryl Varghese, Lynne Vernon-Feagans

Effects of Using Simultaneous Prompting and Computer-Assisted Instruction During Small Group Instruction

Arzu Ozen, Yasemin Ergenekon, Burcu Ulke-Kurkcuoglu Burcu Ulke-Kurkcuoglu

The Relationship Between State Lead Agency and Enrollment Into Early Intervention Services

Erica Twardzik, Megan MacDonald, Alicia Dixon-Ibarra Alicia Dixon-Ibarra

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

23. Bilingual Babies Listen to Language

Source: Science Daily

A recent research study from Princeton University (August 7, 2017) found that bilingual infants can process dual languages quickly and correctly as early as 20 months of age just by listening. The study also revealed that infants can quickly detect when the language is switched in mid-sentence, called "code switches", as regularly experienced in bilingual communities; and "toddlers naturally activate the vocabulary of the language that is being used in any particular setting."

Reference: Byers-Heinlein, K., Morin-Lessard, E., & Lew-Williams, C. (2017). Bilingual infants control their languages as they listen. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 114(34).

24. Information Collecting under Part C - Invitation to Comment Extended

Source: U.S. Department of Education

The U.S. Department of Education has extended its deadline for inviting comments on several proposed information collection requests related to Part C of the IDEA:

The Department is interested in comments that help assess the impact of its information collection requirements and minimize the public's reporting burden. The new deadline for submitting comments is October 27, 2017.

25. Building Inclusive State Child Care Systems

Source: Childcare Aware of America, Division for Early Childhood, & the Ounce

This recent brief (September 2017) gives an historical account of the progress of policy supporting inclusion of young children with disabilities in early childcare settings. Strategies designed to maximize opportunities for promoting inclusion follow. The first step is to identify the child care, Part C and Part B 619 agency partners, technical assistance and support systems already in place in your state and schedule a meeting. Also included are grant opportunities and FAQs for early educators and families.

26. Partnering With Families in Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI)

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE)

This August 2017 OPRE report includes a tip sheet with several strategies to assist grantees of MIECHV funds to partner with families in order to sustain CQI within their programs. Some suggestions for developing partnerships with families are administering surveys, conducting focus groups, recruiting family members to co-lead CQI initiatives in a family advisory council, and compensating family participants, such as offering child care discounts or mileage reimbursement.

27. The Evidence Base for How We Learn

Source: The Aspen Institute

This research brief (September 2017) from the Council of Distinguished Scientists makes an evidence based statement with a benefit cost analysis that a prepared workforce in early childhood education is crucial, due to its powerful influence in supporting students' social and emotional development, and academic learning. Integrating social and emotional skills at the forefront of education practice and policy "is foundational to the success of our young people" and "allows individuals to contribute meaningfully to society".

28. Part C 2017 Tipping Points Survey Results

Source: IDEA Infant & Toddler Coordinators Association (ITCA)

ITCA recently published its 12th annual report (September 2017) containing survey responses from 48 of the 56 states and jurisdictions regarding issues for implementing Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). ITCA uses this information to track emerging issues regarding eligibility, finance, and continued participation in the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA).

29. Implementing Otoacoustic Emissions (OAE) Hearing Screening

Source: ECHO Initiative

The ECHO Initiative is offering an interactive web class series next month to help prepare early care and education providers to implement Otoacoustic Emissions (OAE) hearing screening to young children. This series consists of four 60 minute live sessions. Each session will include hands-on skill-based assignments for participants to practice during the session. Registration deadline is October 12, 2017. For more information, contact echo.ncham@usu.edu.

30. Self-Assessment for Early Childhood Programs Serving Families Experiencing Homelessness

Source: U.S. Department of Human Services Administration for Children and Families (ACF), and the Ounce

This self-assessment tool from the Ounce and ACF (Summer 2017) is designed specifically for welcoming and supporting families and children experiencing homelessness in early childhood programs. Child care and early education practitioners take on an important role in identifying families with young children experiencing homelessness, and connecting them to other community resources. Included are recommendations for responding appropriately to the unique needs of preschoolers and their families experiencing homelessness in five areas: Identification and Support; Removal of Barriers; Responding to Family Needs; Engagement in Strategic Collaboration; and Improving Collection, Reporting and Utilization of Data. Additional resources to support programs are also provided.

31. Learning Outcomes Mobile App from Head Start

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services

Head Start's mobile app: ELOF2GO is a mobile resource for teachers who want to access and learn more about the Head Start Early Learning Outcomes Framework (ELOF). The application (app) provides on-the-go access to the ELOF goals for children and effective teaching practices in support of those goals. It is designed for teachers, family child care providers, and home visitors. You can find the app on Google Play, the Apple App Store, or from the Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center (September 2017).

32. Key Competencies for Licensors of Child Care Programs

Source: National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance

This new guide (June 2017) outlines the knowledge, skills and other characteristics that a child care program licensor needs in order to perform his/her job successfully. The key competencies include: supporting child development, caseload management, accountability, communication, supporting compliance and quality improvement, monitoring and enforcement, and leadership. Also provided are sample interview questions, and suggestions for performance evaluation and professional development.

33. Designing Family-Friendly Consumer Education on Child Care

Source: National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance

This recent brief (June 2017) offers support to state agencies in response to provisions in the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 and the 2016 Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) final rule, requiring improved family-friendly consumer education. In particular, each state must maintain a website containing information about child care providers in the state or local area, results of providers' monitoring and inspection reports (including health and safety violations), and a list of resources for parents, including financial assistance.

34. Appreciating How Fathers Give Children a Head Start

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services

The Health and Human Services Administration is campaigning for fathers (August 2017). "In a 26-year-long study, researchers found that the number one factor in developing empathy in children was father involvement." This overview from Head Start's responsible fatherhood program explains how father-love is different from mother-love, and how fatherlessness negatively impacts all aspects of early childhood development and school readiness. A reading list is also included.

35. Early Childhood Workforce Text4Teachers

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services

Text4Teachers supports Head Start and Early Head Start teachers, staff members, and others who care for and teach young children in center-based and family child care settings. You can sign up to receive two free text messages per month with information, tips, research, and resources to strengthen and support your teaching practices. Text4Teachers will also share messages about key events and professional development (PD) opportunities. To sign up, text ECDTL to 22660, and you will have access to the newest resources as soon as they are released. Text4Teachers is also available in Spanish.

36. Child Care & Early Education - Research Connections

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) & the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)

Research Connections, supported by grant from OPRE, promotes high-quality research and informing policy through free access to thousands of publications and datasets for researchers, policy-makers, practitioners, and other early child care stakeholders. Access recent announcements from Research Connections, here.

37. New Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (IECMH) Policy Series

Source: ZERO TO THREE

ZERO TO THREE announced its new Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (IECMH) Policy Series (August 2017). This series of briefing papers on IECMH policy is designed to generate awareness, interest, and action among federal and state policymakers, behavioral health administrators, and advocates. Each briefing paper provides an overview of the topic, a summary of key terms, and policy recommendations. Topics include:

38. Supporting Transitions: Resources for Building Collaboration

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services

Supporting transitions can have positive effects on children and their families, and collaboration is key to effective transitions. For this reason, the Office of Head Start provides a series of transition briefs. Each of the four briefs focuses on a different partnership level: (1) child and family, (2) early educators, (3) early care and education (ECE) programs, and (4) ECE partners. The Head Start Program Performance Standards outline transition requirements in 1302 Subpart G-Transition Services. The available briefs include:

39. Effective Family Engagement-Boosting School Readiness

Source: U.S. Department of Education and Health and Human Services

The Office of Head Start provides a series of simulations for effectively engaging families from the start. The series explores the practice of everyday strategies to develop Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with a family. These relationships are key to our work with children and families, including the journey toward school readiness.

  • Simulation 1 allows you to practice building bonds with families, beginning with an intake visit.
  • Simulation 2 explores the process of developing and implementing goals with families.
  • Simulation 3 explores using strengths-based attitudes to partner with families during challenging times.
  • Simulation 4 shows how to talk to families about developmental concerns.

40. Every Child Belongs: Welcoming a Child with a Disability

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)

In the latest issue of Teaching Young Children from NAEYC (August 2017), suggestions for basic modifications and strategies to support children with disabilities in the classroom are provided. The article also reminds teachers to re-examine their own beliefs and knowledge about families and child development so that they can effectively set realistic expectations for children with disabilities.

41. Addressing Health Disparities in Early Childhood

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

This recent CDC Grand Rounds (July 28, 2017), focuses on healthy child development, as the "...cumulative and lifelong impact of early experiences, both positive and negative, on a child's development can be profound." For this reason, early identification of at-risk children and/or those with developmental delay(s) is crucial to improving outcomes. Other crucial elements mentioned for improving outcomes are integrating support services for children and their families, integrating behavioral and physical health, and promoting supportive relationships within the community.

42. Building Bridges and Bonds Study (B3)

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE)

This OPRE report (April 2017) is the first in a series of publications on B3, and discusses practical and interactive parenting methods designed for low-income fathers to best meet the social-emotional needs of their young children. The B3 study aims to identify services over the next 3 years that can measurably improve the outcomes of fathers who participate in Responsible Fatherhood programs. Information about the following three innovations are included:

1) a cognitive behavioral workshop that builds skills for employment stability
2) an interactive approach to high-quality parenting that emphasizes parent-child bonding through play
3) an engagement and retention approach using DadTime, a smartphone-based mobile application

43. DEC Position Statement-Call for Comments Deadline Extended

Source: Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Early Childhood (DEC)

DEC has extended its deadline to August 11, 2017 for seeking input on its revised position statement on Personnel Standards for Early Education and Early Intervention. To provide input, click here. Please feel free to share this survey with friends and colleagues who are interested or have expertise on the topic.

44. Supporting Parents to Help Children Thrive

Source: Nemours and the Aspen Institute

Nemours Children's Health System and the Health, Medicine and Society Program of the Aspen Institute created this support guide after collaborating with health care and education experts from multiple organizations "to consider existing and new federal policies likely to promote effective parenting." This collaboration and guide was based on the recommendations of the 2016 report, Parenting Matters: Supporting Parents of Children 0-8 by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

45. Early Childhood Special Education and ESSA: A Great Opportunity for All

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) and New America

According to the latest Early Ed in ESSA: Helping Every Child Succeed blog (July 2017), DaSy and ECTA, both national technical assistance centers, encourage states to make the inclusion of children with disabilities a priority, as part of their efforts to improve early learning programs. "Planning for the inclusion of young children with disabilities in new or expanded early learning programs offers local education agencies the additional benefit of supporting their efforts under IDEA."

46. Developing a Statewide Network of Infant/Toddler Specialists

Source: Office of Child Care (OCC)

This revised guide (April 2017) from the OCC provides states with a step-by-step approach to creating an infant/toddler specialist network, and explores the importance of linking the network to other programs and consultants for supporting quality early care.

47. Enhancing Reflection, Relationships, and Respect: New NM PreK Video

Source: New Mexico PreK Video-Based Consultation Project

The New Mexico PreK Video-Based Consultation Project has been using video to support teachers and other service providers to learn new skills, participate in ongoing professional development, and engage in reflective practice and Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). The project recently launched a new video titled, Enhancing Reflection, Relationships, and Respect. Teachers are videotaped in the classroom, then given the opportunity to view the videos and reflect on activities and social interactions that worked well with the children, as well as, identify areas for improvement.

48. Starting Strong 2017

Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

The OECD has released its 2017 report providing an exhaustive overview of key indicators global-wide and new trend data affecting early childhood education and care (ECEC). The report focuses on issues, such as access and governance, equity, financing, curriculum, the teaching workforce and parent engagement. It also identifies the key challenges for improving ECEC.

49. NSECE Summary Briefs

Source: National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)

The National Survey of Early Care and Education has published a series of briefs (June 2017) after surveying 12K families and nearly 20K home-based providers, classroom staff, and program directors. The briefs offer practical information and data for state and local education officials to use for program planning and implementation. See below:

  • (Brief 1) How are center-based early childhood education programs funded?
  • (Brief 2) Characteristics of home-based child care providers
  • (Brief 3) How do parents make decisions about ECE arrangements?
  • (Brief 4) Characteristics of the early care and education workforce
  • (Brief 5) Early care and education centers that participate in Head Start and public pre-kindergarten
  • (Brief 6) Center-based early care and education programs: program size and ages served

50. The Head Start Advantage: A Research Compendium - June 2017

Source: National Head Start Association (NHSA)

This compendium summarizes several key studies published in recent years that represent the best evidence about Head Start's effectiveness. Included are economic analyses, longitudinal studies, and secondary analyses demonstrating the positive impact of Head Start programs for participating children. The report also mentions that the Head Start advantage is particularly influential to children with low developmental skills, Hispanic children, and African American children; and the positive outcomes offer significant cost benefits to society.

51. Invitation to Comment - Data Collection for Children Receiving Early Intervention Services Under Part C

Source: U.S. Department of Education

The U.S. Department of Education is inviting comments on a proposed information collection request related to the reporting of infants and toddlers receiving early intervention services and of program settings where services are provided in accordance with Part C. The Department is interested in comments that help assess the impact of its information collection requirements and minimize the public's reporting burden. Comments must be received by August 21, 2017. To learn more, see the Federal Register Notice.

52. DEC Position Statement on Personnel Standards in Early Childhood Special Education - Call for Comments

Source: Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Early Childhood

The Council for Exceptional Children's Division for Early Childhood (DEC) has revised its position statement on Personnel Standards for Early Education and Early Intervention, and is accepting general input about the position statement until June 30, 2017. See the full announcement for more information. To provide input, click here . Please feel free to share this survey with friends and colleagues who are interested or have expertise on this topic.

53. New OSEP Memo on Response to Eligibility Determinations for Children Suspected of Having a Visual Impairment

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP)

OSEP has published a new memo, OSEP Memorandum 17-05 (May 22, 2017) to provide additional guidance to assist states with supporting their local education agencies in reaching appropriate eligibility determinations for children with a visual impairment disability, including blindness. Additional resources are listed at the end of the memo to help states examine their procedures that relate to the identification and evaluation of children with this disability.

54. Measures Taken to Prevent Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

According to the CDC (June 2017), Puerto Rico reported the largest number of confirmed cases of Zika virus infections among pregnant women in the U.S. between Jan. 2016- Mar. 2017. "Most women (98.1%) reported using at least one measure to avoid mosquitos in their home environment. However, only 45.8% of women reported wearing mosquito repellent daily, and 11.5% reported wearing pants and shirts with long sleeves daily." See additional statistics below:

55. School Improvement Starts Before School: Under ESSA, States Can Start Re-Orienting Districts Towards the Early Years (Early Ed in ESSA: Helping Every Child Succeed - Blog Series)

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes and New America

According to a recent entry from the blog series Early Ed in ESSA: Helping Every Child Succeed (May 2017), K-2 years have historically been ignored in state accountability systems. ESSA gives states new flexibility to focus dollars on early learning, and this means new approaches for measuring accountability and school improvement systems, and addressing different needs for K-2. These additional resources are provided at the end of the article:

56. Hispanic Children's Participation in Early Care and Education: A Look at Utilization Patterns of Chicago's Publicly Funded Programs

Source: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families

A recent report (April 2017) from the National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families states that 83 percent of low-income Hispanic children participated in some form of publicly funded center or home-based early childhood education; a rate similar to that of their non-Hispanic peers and higher than previous studies report. This increase suggests that educational achievements for low-income Hispanic children will greatly impact the social and economic well-being of the country, and more research-based information is needed to support the needs of this growing population.

This brief is part of a series that focuses on research to help us better understand the early care and education experiences of Latino children.

57. New Resources on Social-Emotional Development

Source: Too Small to Fail Initiative

The Too Small to Fail initiative has released a new white paper, Not Just "Soft Skills": How Young Children’s Learning & Health Benefit from Strong Social-Emotional Development (May 2017), highlighting the research on the importance of children’s social-emotional development (SED) starting at birth. In addition, the initiative has developed new resources on SED to share directly with parents and caregivers around the country. These resources are designed to help parents easily understand the concepts behind SED, and how to apply research-based tips to their everyday lives. They include:

  • A series of videos showing that every child behavior - including a seemingly random grocery store meltdown - is actually driven by emotions
  • A set of complementary tip sheets to encourage talking, reading, and singing with children in sensitive, loving, and responsive ways. The tip sheets also include helpful ideas for understanding and managing a child's behavior.

All of the resources are available in Spanish.

58. Social and Emotional Learning

Source: Future of Children

The Spring 2017 issue of Future of Children, Social and Emotional Learning (Vol. 27, Issue 1), focuses on the "state of the science when it comes to SEL intervention and assessment, while also tackling important policy issues in education. The eight articles are intended to help shed light on how best to support SEL in schools and to explore how SEL in schools might impact important policy questions in education." See also, the accompanying policy brief, Social and Emotional Learning: A Policy Vision for the Future by Clark McKown.

59. Gender Differences in the Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program

Source: National Bureau of Economic Research

A recently published paper, Gender Differences in the Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program (NBER Working Paper No. 23412, May 2017), by Jorge Luis Garcia, James J. Heckman, Anna L. Ziff, examines how participation in early childhood programs differentially impacts the lives of disadvantaged boys and girls. The authors find that although high-quality programs can have positive impacts across the life cycle for both boys and girls, low-quality programs can have harmful effects on many outcomes, especially for boys, and can contribute to gender gaps. The authors discuss the different impacts for boys and girls and the sources of these differences.

60. A Journey Toward Strong Programs and Thriving Families

Source: HHS, Office of Early Childhood Development

The Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (Tribal MIECHV) program provides grants to develop, implement, and evaluate home visiting programs in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. A Journey Toward Strong Programs and Thriving Families: The Story of Three Tribal Home Visiting Grantees (May 2017) describes the experiences of three communities that have participated in the Tribal MIECHV program and the impacts the program has had. It discusses the systems changes that can provide a lasting and strong foundation upon which evidence-based home visiting programs can succeed and provides insights for other communities working on home visiting. Learn more about Tribal Home Visiting implementation.

61. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent (Online First May 16, 2017)

Internalizing Behaviors and Hyperactivity/Inattention: Consequences for Young Struggling Readers, and Especially Boys

Justin D. Garwood, Cheryl Varghese, Lynne Vernon-Feagans

The Relationship Between State Lead Agency and Enrollment Into Early Intervention Services

Erica Twardzik, Megan MacDonald, Alicia Dixon-Ibarra

Beyond ASD: Evidence for the Effectiveness of Social Narratives

Kathleen N. Zimmerman, Jennifer R. Ledford

Parents’ Experiences Navigating Intervention Systems for Young Children With Mild Language Delays

Jennifer Marshall, Andrea Adelman, Stacey M. Kesten, Ruby A. Natale, Batya Elbaum

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

62. Open doors: Supporting children and Families' Access to Early Care and Education

Source: Early Childhood Data Collaborative - April 2017

A short brief, Open doors: Supporting Children and Families' Access to Early Care and Education (2017), shares strategies and recommendations for how states can use their early care and education (ECE) data to better understand the needs of families in their communities, the best ways to meet those needs, the availability of services, and how to improve families' access to high-quality ECE programs.

63. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: Journal of Early Intervention- Volume: 39, Number: 2 (June 2017)

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/39/2

Father Involvement in Early Intervention: Exploring the Gap Between Service Providers' Perceptions and Practices

Brent A. McBride, Sarah J. Curtiss, Kelly Uchima, Daniel J. Laxman, Rosa M. Santos, Jenna Weglarz-Ward, Wm. Justin Dyer, Laurie M. Jeans, Justin Kern

The Importance of Authentic Assessments in Eligibility Determination for Infants and Toddlers

Stephanie Lynn de Sam Lazaro

Comparative Language Development in Bilingual and Monolingual Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review

Emily M. Lund, Theresa L. Kohlmeier, Lillian K. Durán

Teachers' Use of High- and Low-Support Scaffolding Strategies to Differentiate Language Instruction in High-Risk/Economically Disadvantaged Settings

Jill M. Pentimonti, Laura M. Justice, Gloria Yeomans-Maldonado, Anita S. McGinty, Laura Slocum, Ann O’Connell

The Effects of Play-Based Intervention on Vocabulary Acquisition by Preschoolers at Risk for Reading and Language Delays

Ragan H. McLeod, Jessica K. Hardy, Ann P. Kaiser

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

64. Child Care Experiences Among Dual Language Learners in the United States

Source: AERA Open - April-June 2017

A recent study used nationally representative data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort to examine child care experiences of children who are dual language learners (DLLs). After accounting for demographic and contextual factors, the results showed few differences in the quality and type of child care experienced by DLL children and non-DLL children. The findings underscore the importance of distinguishing among socioeconomic status, ethnicity, country of origin, and other factors when looking at the child care experiences of dual language learners. To learn more, see the full article:

Espinosa, L. M., LaForett, D. R., Burchinal, M., Winsler, A., Tien, H-C., Peisner-Feinberg, E. S., & Castro, D. C. (2017). Child Care Experiences Among Dual Language Learners in the United States: Analyses of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort. AERA Open, 3(2), 1-15. doi 10.1177/2332858417699380

AERA Open is a peer-reviewed, open access journal published by the American Educational Research Association.

65. Equity in IDEA Guidance Released

Source: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services - March 31, 2017

The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) has released Significant Disproportionality (Equity in IDEA) Essential Questions and Answers (March 2017), which provides guidance on the Equity in IDEA Final Regulation released in December 2016. OSERS has also released a Model State Timeline (March 2017) outlining different streams of work and the timelines that states should consider as they implement the new rule.

66. Working Toward a Definition of Infant/Toddler Curricula

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - April 6, 2017

A new brief explores the meaning of the word "curriculum" when applied to working with infants and toddlers. Working Toward a Definition of Infant/Toddler Curricula: Intentionally Furthering the Development of Individual Children within Responsive Relationships (OPRE Report #2017-15) focuses on how programs can incorporate and use the concepts of a curriculum in a way that is developmentally appropriate for infants and toddlers. The brief was developed by the Network of Infant/Toddler Researchers and the Quality Initiatives Research and Evaluation Consortium.

67. The Years Before School: Children's Nonparental Care Arrangements From 2001 to 2012

Source: National Center for Education Statistics - March 28, 2017

A new report, The Years Before School: Children's Nonparental Care Arrangements From 2001 to 2012 (March 2017), examines the nonparental care arrangements of young children in the U. S. who are not yet enrolled in kindergarten. It examines the arrangements children participate in, the time they spend in these arrangements, and out-of-pocket expenses for families. It finds that almost 60% of children, from birth through age 5, participate in nonparental care arrangements. In 2012, there were higher out-of-pocket hourly expenses for care than in 2001. The expense for center-based care increased by 58%, for relative care by 57%, and for nonrelative care by 25%. Out-of-pocket hourly expenses for center-based programs were the most expensive for families.

68. National Center on Improving Literacy (NCIL) Launches Website.

Source: U.S. Department of Education - March 21. 2017

The new National Center on Improving Literacy recently launched its website. NCIL will provide technical assistance services to families to improve literacy outcomes for children in pre-K through grade 12 with, or at risk for, literacy-related disabilities, including dyslexia. Family-focused activities will include a repository of evidence-based products and assessments; the online Kids Zone, which facilitates effective child-adult interactions for literacy development; the Ask-an-Expert tool; and a text messaging plug-in to receive text messages alerting users to new resources, events, or literacy tips. NCIL is jointly administered by the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services and the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education.

69. NM PreK Video Library Launched

Source: New Mexico PreK Video-Based Consultation Project - March 6, 2017

The New Mexico PreK Video-Based Consultation Project supports teachers and other service providers to learn new skills, participate in ongoing professional development, and engage in reflective practice and Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). The project recently launched a new NM PreK Video Library to share their work, including illustrations of ways that video can be used as a foundation for reflective practice, coaching, consultation, and supervision to enhance early care and education practices. Three new videos were recently posted, including:

  • Supporting Reflective Practice and Positive Outcomes for Children
  • Reflections on the New Mexico PreK Video-Based Consultation Project
  • Recording Video in the Classroom

For more information about the video library, or permission to embed any of the videos, please contact: Sarah Simms

70. Request for Information on Pediatric Alternative Payment Model Opportunities

Source: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services - February 28, 2017

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently announced a Request for Information (RFI) seeking input on approaches to improve pediatric care - specifically on approaches to improve the quality and reduce the cost of care for children enrolled in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). CMS is also exploring concepts that encourage pediatric providers to collaborate with health-related social service providers at the state, tribal, and local levels and share accountability for health outcomes for children enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP. See a related blog post here.

CMS invites stakeholders to submit comments and questions via email to HealthyChildrenandYouth@cms.hhs.gov by 11:59 PM on March 28th, 2017. For more information about the RFI, visit the CMS Innovation Center website. Download the RFI in PDF form here.

71. Parent Engagement Practices Improve Outcomes for Preschool Children

Source: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - February 2017

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has compiled a collection of resources on supporting children's social and emotional development to help them lead healthy and successful lives. Social and emotional learning (SEL) provides a foundation for healthy development, helping children to develop the skills they need to engage with others, manage their emotions, show empathy, handle stress, set goals, make responsible decisions, and succeed later in work and in life. The most recent brief in the collection looks at Parent Engagement Practices Improve Outcomes for Preschool Children (February 2017)

72. Supporting the Use of Administrative Data in Early Care and Education Research

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - February 2017

Three new resources on Supporting the Use of Administrative Data in Early Care and Education Research (February 2017), provide information that is meant to help state and territory child care administrators and their research partners use administrative data to address policy-relevant early care and education research questions. They include:

73. La Familia: Latino Families Strong and Stable, Despite Limited Resources

Source: National Research Center on Hispanic Children and Families - February 23, 2017

A new 3-brief series, La Familia: Latino Families Strong and Stable, Despite Limited Resources (February 2017), provides a portrait of Latino family life to look at how parents and in particular, boys, are faring. The series analyzes extensive data from 2010 on and finds that Latino families, especially Latino immigrant families, have many of the characteristics linked to child and adult well-being, despite many having low levels of income and education. Additionally, it finds that though many preschool-aged Latino boys lag behind their white peers on academic measures, they have many of the cognitive and social-emotional skills that are important for school success. The briefs are meant to help practitioners, program providers, and policy makers better understand the populations and families they serve.

74. Building our Future: Supporting Community-Based Early Childhood Initiatives

Source: Child Trends - February 23, 2017

In 2016, Child Trends, together with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the George Kaiser Family Foundation, brought together practitioners, policymakers, business leaders, researchers, and philanthropists from across the country to examine what makes for a successful community-based early childhood initiative aimed at improving the well-being of children in the U.S., especially the many children who are poor. The meeting focused on the early childhood initiatives of three featured communities: Tulsa, Oklahoma; Durham, North Carolina; and the state of Oregon. A new report, Building our Future: Supporting Community-Based Early Childhood Initiatives (February 2017), provides highlights of early childhood initiatives in these three communities and summarizes cross-cutting themes gleaned from these initiatives as well as from diverse stakeholders and experts.

75. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - OnlineFirst - February 13, 2017

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent

The Importance of Authentic Assessments in Eligibility Determination for Infants and Toddlers

Stephanie Lynn de Sam Lazaro

Comparative Language Development in Bilingual and Monolingual Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review

Emily M. Lund, Theresa L. Kohlmeier, Lillian K. Duran

Father Involvement in Early Intervention: Exploring the Gap Between Service Providers' Perceptions and Practices

Brent A. McBride, Sarah J. Curtiss, Kelly Uchima, Daniel J. Laxman, Rosa M. Santos, Jenna Weglarz-Ward, Wm. Justin Dyer, Laurie M. Jeans, Justin Kern

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

76. ESSA and the Use of Assistive and Instructional technology

Source: Center on Technology and Disability - February 14, 2017

The Center on Technology and Disability has published the following resources showing how the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) supports the effective use of assistive and instructional technology to enhance teaching and learning.

77. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - March 2017

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/39/1

Abuse and Young Children With Disabilities

Catherine Corr, Rosa Milagros Santos

Factors That Affect Age of Identification of Children With an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Chana R. Adelman, Thomas Kubiszyn

Social Experiences of Children With Disabilities in Inclusive Portuguese Preschool Settings

Milene Ferreira, Cecilia Aguiar, Nadine Correia, Margarida Fialho, Julia Serpa Pimentel

Promoting Healthy Weight Among Children With Developmental Delays

Ruby R. Natale, Stephanie T. Camejo, Lila Asfour, Susan B. Uhlhorn, Alan Delamater, Sarah E. Messiah

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

78. Parent Engagement Practices Improve Outcomes for Preschool Children

Source: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - February 2017

A new Robert Wood Johnson Foundation research brief, Parent Engagement Practices Improve Outcomes for Preschool Children (February 2017), describes research-based approaches to effectively engage families and children at risk for poor school readiness. The brief highlights findings from recent studies with preschool children (ages 3-5) and focuses on effective parent engagement models that improve school readiness outcomes in well-controlled studies. It finds that supporting parents' efforts to help their children develop during the preschool years improves a child's school readiness, reduces behavior problems, enhances social skills, and promotes academic success.

79. Journal of Early Intervention Abstract Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - OnlineFirst February 6, 2017

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent

Comparative Language Development in Bilingual and Monolingual Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Emily M. Lund, Theresa L. Kohlmeier, Lillian K. Duran

Father Involvement in Early Intervention

Brent A. McBride, et al.

Social Experiences of Children With Disabilities in Inclusive Portuguese Preschool Settings

Milene Ferreira, Cecilia Aguiar, Nadine Correia, Margarida Fialho, Julia Serpa Pimentel

Factors That Affect Age of Identification of Children With an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Chana R. Adelman, Thomas Kubiszyn

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

80. Professional Development Tools to Improve the Quality of Infant and Toddler Care

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation - January 2017

A new report, Professional Development Tools to Improve the Quality of Infant and Toddler Care: A Review of the Literature (January 2017), highlights promising professional development methods for enhancing caregiver interactions with young children, particularly caregivers of infants and toddlers, those with limited education, and those in home-based and family child care settings. It draws on recent reviews, empirical studies, and meta-analyses conducted within the past 10 years, as well as the websites of leading professional development and research organizations.

81. Supporting Early Education in State ESSA Plans - Updated State Scan

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes - January 27, 2017

Since the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) was signed into law on December 10, 2015, states have been making plans for a smooth transition into full implementation, scheduled for 2017. The Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) recently reviewed the State Department of Education websites of all states and posted an updated version of their Every Student Succeeds Act and Opportunities to Prioritize Early Learning Policy: State Scan (updated January 2017). This resource was developed to assist the field in identifying opportunities and best practices to support the elevation of early learning in ESSA state plans. It includes:

  • Links to state pages devoted to ESSA information
  • State timelines for the development of state plans
  • Examples of early childhood engagement in state plans
  • Links to state plans that have been posted publicly
  • Links to information about strategies states are using to gather public input and engage stakeholders

For this and other relevant resources, visit the ESSA page on the CEELO website.

82. Autism Spectrum Disorder (Part 2): Evidence-Based Practices - Free Online Module

Source: The IRIS Center - January 20, 2017

The IRIS Center has released a free online module, Autism Spectrum Disorder (Part 2): Evidence-Based Practices (January 2017), highlighting effective strategies that can be used for teaching appropriate behaviors and skills and decreasing inappropriate behaviors with children and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A number of the strategies and examples provided are particularly effective with young children. The module includes video examples, practice vignettes, and recorded interviews. The first module in this two-part series, Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Overview for Educators (August 2015), provides information on the early warning signs of ASD, the difference between a medical diagnosis and an educational determination of ASD, the strengths and needs of children with ASD, key team members, and how family members might be affected.

83. International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - New Issue Available

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - December 2016

The December 2016 issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) (Volume 8, Issue 2) is now available online and freely accessible. INT-JECSE is an open-access, peer reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. View the Table of Contents with abstracts and links to the full-text articles.

84. Dear Colleague Letter - Preschool Least Restrictive Environments

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs - January 9, 2017

The Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) has released an updated Dear Colleague Letter related to Preschool Least Restrictive Environments (LRE) (January 9, 2017). The letter provides updated guidance and clarification on: Key Statutory and Regulatory Requirements, Preschool Placement Options, Reporting Educational Environments Data for Preschool Children with Disabilities, and Use of IDEA Part B Funds for Preschool Children with Disabilities. It reaffirms OSEP's position that all young children with disabilities should have access to inclusive high-quality early childhood programs where they are provided with individualized and appropriate supports to enable them to meet high expectations.

Additional OSEP Memos, Dear Colleague Letters and Policy Letters are publicly available online. A subset of OSEP guidance documents related to the early childhood provisions of the IDEA (Part C and Part B, Section 619) can be accessed on the ECTA Center Web site.

85. Resource Guide: Building a Bright Future for All

Source: U.S. Department of Education - January 2017

The U.S. Department of Education has released a new guide entitled, Resource Guide: Building a Bright Future for All (January 2017). The guide was developed to enhance State and local efforts to support immigrant children from birth through the elementary grades. The first half provides tips for educators in early learning programs and elementary schools as well as schools, districts, and States to: (1) facilitate school enrollment by immigrant families; (2) promote healthy child development in the school setting; (3) encourage caregiver engagement in their children's education; and (4) build staff knowledge about immigrant children and their educational needs. The second half provides tips for parents and guardians on how to facilitate children's learning and education starting at birth. A blog post from the Department provides more information.

86. Fact Sheets on Children Served by CCDBG

Source: CLASP - January 11, 2017

The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the major federal funding stream for states to help make quality child care affordable for low-income parents. Over the past decade, the CCDBG program has been serving fewer eligible children due to declining federal and state investments. CLASP has released two new fact sheets discussing some of the consequences of this trend:

  • CCDBG Participation Drops to Historic Low (January 2017) - This fact sheet shows that 21% fewer children received CCDBG-funded child care in an average month in 2015 than in 2006. This is the smallest number of children served in the history of CCDBG. It also finds that more than 85% of children who qualify for help cannot access the program.
  • Fewer Children, Fewer Providers (January 2017) - This fact sheet finds that the number of child care providers receiving CCDBG payments has declined by 52% since 2006. This is the fewest number of providers to participate in the program ever. It also discusses changes in the types of providers receiving CCDBG payments and the implications of these changes.

87. New Videos: Evidence-Based Teaching Practices That Support Social Emotional Development

Source: Pyramid Model Consortium - January 4, 2017

Two new videos are available for viewing on the Pyramid Model Consortium website. The videos highlight evidence-based teaching practices that support young children's social emotional development, as demonstrated by a high fidelity Pyramid Model implementation site. A table of contents is provided at the beginning of each video so viewers can easily navigate to specific segments.

The videos were collaboratively produced by the Montana Head Start Collaborative Office, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Early Childhood Services Bureau, the Pyramid Model Consortium, and the Bal Swan Children's Center.

88. Equity in IDEA Final Regulations Released

Source: U.S. Department of Education - December 19, 2016

The U.S. Department of Education recently released Final Regulations under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to address issues related to significant disproportionality in the identification, placement, and discipline of students with disabilities based on race or ethnicity. They are effective January 18, 2017. The Department's Office of Civil Rights has also released policy guidance (Dear Colleague Letter, Fact Sheet, FAQs) on preventing racial discrimination in special education. For additional information, see the Press Release here.

89. Guide on Preventing Suspensions and Expulsions in Early Childhood Settings

Source: SRI International - December 14, 2016

A new research-based tool, Preventing Suspensions and Expulsions in Early Childhood Settings: A Program Leader's Guide to Supporting All Children's Success, provides recommended policies and practices that address the underlying root causes of suspension and expulsion and effective alternatives. It was developed with guidance from a panel of national experts. The interactive guide includes resources on supporting social-emotional development, reducing challenging behavior, recognizing the role of cultural differences and implicit biases, and more. A self-assessment survey is included to help provide a tailored roadmap to navigating the guide.

90. Policy Statement on Babies Affected by Alcohol and Substance Exposure

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - December 21, 2016

Many communities across the U.S. are experiencing significant increases in the use of opioids and in the numbers of babies experiencing Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). A new policy statement, Supporting the Development of Young Children in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities Who are Affected by Alcohol and Substance Exposure (December 2016), addresses children affected by opioids and other substance abuse during pregnancy, including Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). It is meant to:

  • raise awareness of the developmental challenges children who have been exposed to alcohol or substances face;
  • highlight culturally-based and evidence-based strategies to support the early development of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children, their families, and communities;
  • support tribal efforts to coordinate and leverage services and activities across communities to benefit young children, families, and communities; and
  • identify culturally and linguistically responsive resources to support tribal communities, early childhood programs, and families in fostering the early development and learning of AI/AN children.

Although the policy statement responds to the issue in AI/AN communities, it is relevant to many communities across America.

91. Executive Function: Implications for Education

Source: Institute of Education Sciences - November 29, 2016

Research on early educational practices designed to enhance child learning and development through a focus on executive function (EF) skills has grown substantially over the past two decades. Executive function skills are the attention-regulation skills that make it possible to sustain attention, keep goals and information in mind, refrain from responding immediately, resist distraction, tolerate frustration, consider the consequences of different behaviors, reflect on past experiences, and plan for the future. A new paper, Executive Function: Implications for Education (November 2016), highlights key findings from recent EF research and discusses the relevance of these findings to educational research and practice, with a particular relevance to early education.

92. Final ESSA Regulations on Accountability, State Plans and Data Reporting

Source: U.S. Department of Education - November 28, 2016

The final regulations to implement the accountability, data reporting, and state plan provisions of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) were released on November 28, 2016. Highlights of key changes made in response to direct feedback from public comments can be found in the press release from the U.S. Department of Education. These regulations are effective January 30, 2017.

93. Preschool Development Grants: Progress Update and New Awards

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - November 29, 2016

A new National report (November 2016) and 18 state progress reports on the Preschool Development Grants (PDG) program highlight how states are meeting standards and improving access to early learning programs for at-risk children. They show that more children had the chance to enroll in these programs because of the PDG program, and classrooms improved by supporting well-qualified and compensated teachers, expanding to full-day, reducing class size or child-teacher ratios, providing evidence-based professional development, and providing comprehensive services.

The Departments have also announced that 18 states will receive more than $247.4 million in awards under the PDG program to continue their work in expanding access to high-quality preschool for children from low- to moderate-income families. Learn more here.

94. Hispanic Children's Participation in Early Care and Education

Source: National Research Center on Hispanic Children and Families - November 17, 2016

A new series of briefs looks at early care and education (ECE) program use among Latino families across the United States, finding that gaps in ECE participation between low-income Hispanic children and their peers may be closing, especially in the preschool years. Additionally, some of the hardest-to-reach groups, such as immigrant families, are accessing ECE programs. The briefs in the series include:

95. Strengthening the Kindergarten-Third Grade Continuum

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures - November 9, 2016

A new report, Strengthening the Kindergarten-Third Grade Continuum (November 2016), provides an overview of policy options state policymakers can use to expand access to quality kindergarten through third grade learning opportunities to help put children on successful, lifelong trajectories and ensure that the benefits of preschool do not diminish overtime. It focuses on areas such as: full-day kindergarten (FDK), social-emotional learning (SEL), kindergarten entry assessments (KEAs), English language learner reclassification procedures (ELL), and student-teacher ratios (Ratios).

96. Supporting Young Children with Disabilities

Source: Future of Children - Fall 2016

A recently published article, Supporting Young Children with Disabilities, by Kathy Hebbeler and Donna Spiker, co-directors of the Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy), discusses:

  • the challenges of identifying young children with disabilities and a new framework for describing disability;
  • what is known about effective interventions to support development and learning among young children with disabilities, including language and social skills interventions, preschool curricula, effective instructional practices, and multi-tiered systems of support;
  • a critical policy issue: the inclusion of young children with disabilities in regular education classrooms; and
  • what is known about supporting children as they transition from one setting to another across the preschool to third grade span.

The article was published in the Fall 2016 issue of The Future of Children, entitled Starting Early: Education from Prekindergarten to Third Grade.

97. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - December 2016; Vol. 38, No. 4

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/38/4

Literature Review - Family Quality of Life: A Key Outcome in Early Childhood Intervention Services - A Scoping Review

Anoo Bhopti, Ted Brown, and Primrose Lentin

Interactive Storybook-Based Intervention Effects on Kindergartners' Language Development

Loes van Druten-Frietman, Heleen Strating, Eddie Denessen, and Ludo Verhoeven

Dialogic Reading: Language and Preliteracy Outcomes for Young Children With Disabilities

Jacqueline A. Towson, Peggy A. Gallagher, and Gary E. Bingham

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

98. Journal of Early Intervention Abstract Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - OnlineFirst October 18, 2016

An abstract of the following article is now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent

Family Quality of Life: A Key Outcome in Early Childhood Intervention Services - A Scoping Review

Anoo Bhopti, Ted Brown, and Primrose Lentin

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

99. New Journal Issue Examines the Effectiveness of Pre-K Education

Source: The Future of Children - Fall 2016

On October 26, 2016, Princeton University and the Brookings Institution hosted an event, Trouble in the Land of Early Childhood Education, to announce the release of the Fall 2016 issue of The Future of Children, entitled Starting Early: Education from Prekindergarten to Third Grade. The Future of Children is a journal that promotes effective, evidence-based policies and programs for children. This issue examines the effectiveness of pre-K education. At the event, journal co-editor Jeanne Brooks-Gunn presented an overview of the volume and Ron Haskins of Brookings discussed a controversy caused by the results of a study of pre-K in Tennessee. A panel of experts discussed the implications of these results for preschool policy and research. Visit the website to watch the video or listen to the audio of the event.

100. Federal Guidance - Supporting Early Learning through the ESSA

Source: U.S. Department of Education - October 20, 2016

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) includes provisions to: promote coordination in early learning among local communities; align preschool with early elementary school; and build the capacity of teachers, leaders and others serving young children to provide high-quality early learning opportunities. The ESSA also authorizes Preschool Development Grants to ensure that more children have access to high-quality preschool. New Non-Regulatory Guidance from the U.S. Department of Education has been released to:

  • remind state and local decision-makers about the importance of investing in early learning;
  • highlight the opportunities available under the new law to strengthen early education; and
  • provide examples of how states and local communities can support young children's success in school.

This and additional guidance related to the ESSA can be found at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/index.html

101. Two Reports Highlight Early Childhood Opportunities in the ESSA

Source: National Association of State Boards of Education and Mid-Atlantic Comprehensive Center at WestEd - October 10, 2016

Two new reports highlight opportunities for supporting and improving access to high quality early childhood education in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

102. Early Childhood Policies and Systems in Eight Countries

Source: International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement - Retrieved October 12, 2016

The Early Childhood Education Study (ECES) aims to explore, describe, and analyze early childhood education provision, and its role in preparing children to learn and function both in school and society. Its first report, Early Childhood Policies and Systems in Eight Countries: Findings from IEA's Early Childhood Education Study (2016), provides an overview of ECE policy strategies in eight countries, including the United States. Key findings look at some of the differing approaches to ECE in the following five areas: public policy; delivery models and providers; participation and enrollment; quality assurance systems; and expectations for child outcomes.

103. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - OnlineFirst September 26, 2016

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent

Interactive Storybook-Based Intervention Effects on Kindergartners' Language Development

Loes van Druten-Frietman, Heleen Strating, Eddie Denessen, and Ludo Verhoeven

Dialogic Reading: Language and Preliteracy Outcomes for Young Children With Disabilities

Jacqueline A. Towson, Peggy A. Gallagher, and Gary E. Bingham

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

104. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - September 2016, 38(3)

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/38/3

A Brief Coaching Intervention for Teaching Naturalistic Strategies to Parents

Justin D. Lane, Jennifer R. Ledford, Collin Shepley, Theologia K. Mataras, Kevin M. Ayres, and Alicia B. Davis

Early Intervention for Children With Hearing Loss: Information Parents Receive About Supporting Children's Language

Kalli B. Decker and Claire D. Vallotton

Effects of a Teacher Versus iPad-Facilitated Intervention on the Vocabulary of At-Risk Preschool Children

Lindsay R. Dennis, Kelly Whalon, Lisa Kraut, and Deborah Herron

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

105. Supporting Young Children: Addressing Poverty, Promoting Opportunity and Advancing Equity in Policy

Source: Center for the Study of Social Policy - September 15, 2016

A new policy report, Supporting Young Children: Addressing Poverty, Promoting Opportunity and Advancing Equity in Policy (September 2016), discusses the effects of poverty on the health, learning, and social emotional development of young children. The authors discuss key issues to consider for preventing and mitigating the consequences of poverty. Some of these include, building opportunities for families to improve their own economic stability and building strong systems of supports and services that promote quality, coordinated, equity-focused and responsive services across sectors. See this related Poverty in Early Childhood Fact Sheet (September 2016).

106. New, Revised Head Start Program Performance Standards Released!

Source: Office of Head Start - September 6, 2016

The Final Rule for the New Head Start Program Performance Standards was published in the Federal Register on September 6, 2016. Effective starting November 2016, the updates reflect best practices and the latest research on early childhood development and brain science. This is the first comprehensive revision of the Standards since they were originally published in 1975. To learn more see:

107. New Reports Look at Long-Term Impacts of the Head Start Program

Source: The Hamilton Project and the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment at Berkeley - September 6, 2016

The following two reports provide new information on the long-term effectiveness of the Head Start Program:

  • Economic Analysis: The Long-Term Impact of the Head Start Program (August 2016) - The Hamilton Project - Findings of this analysis indicate that Head Start has measurable long-term benefits in a number of areas, including: probability of graduating from high school; probability of attending college, and receiving a post-secondary degree, license, or certification; increased positive parenting practices. The analysis used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY)
  • Revisiting the Impact of Head Start (September 2016) - Institute for Research on Labor and Employment at Berkeley - This report discusses new evidence related to the effectiveness of Head Start and concludes that the program has significant benefits for disadvantaged children, including improved school readiness and improved long-term parental involvement in their children's education.

108. Journal of Early Intervention Abstract Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - September 1, 2016

An abstract of the following article is now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent?papetoc

Effects of a Teacher Versus iPad-Facilitated Intervention on the Vocabulary of At-Risk Preschool Children

Lindsay R. Dennis, Kelly Whalon, Lisa Kraut, and Deborah Herron

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

109. Building State P-3 Systems: Learning from Leading States

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes - August 2016

A new policy report, Building State P-3 Systems: Learning from Leading States (August 2016), looks at the role of state education agencies (SEAs) in supporting P-3 system building at the state and local levels. It presents case studies of three states that have devoted significant attention and resources to P-3 efforts - Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts - and highlights a number of themes and patterns that emerged from a comparison of the three states. It concludes with 9 recommendations to help guide P-3 system-building.

110. Recent Trends in Income, Racial, and Ethnic School Readiness Gaps at Kindergarten Entry

Source: AERA Open - August 2016

New research findings show that school readiness gaps narrowed modestly from 1998 to 2010, particularly between low-income children and their wealthier peers and between white and Hispanic children. To learn more, see Recent Trends in Income, Racial, and Ethnic School Readiness Gaps at Kindergarten Entry (August 2016) by Sean F. Reardon and Ximena A. Portilla, published in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed, open access journal of the American Educational Research Association.

111. Using Medicaid To Help Young Children and Parents Access Mental Health Services

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - August 2016

A new report, Using Medicaid To Help Young Children and Parents Access Mental Health Services: Results of a 50-State Survey (August 2016), examines states' use of Medicaid as a key source of funding for early childhood mental health (ECMH) services. Forty-eight states and the District of Columbia participated in a survey, which included interviews with state Medicaid administrators. The report presents key findings from the survey and recommendations for diverse stakeholders to help strengthen supports for young children's mental health.

112. Preschool Pay for Success Feasibility Pilot - Invitation to Apply

Source: U.S. Department of Education - August 22, 2016

The U.S. Department of Education (ED) recently announced the availability of $2.8 million for a new Preschool Pay for Success Feasibility Pilot grant competition for state, local and tribal governments interested in exploring the feasibility of Pay for Success to expand and improve early learning. The feasibility studies will determine if this model is an effective strategy to implement preschool programs that are high-quality and yield meaningful results. The Notice Inviting Applications was published in the Federal Register on August 22, 2016. The deadline for submitting an intent to apply notice is September 12, 2016. Applications are due on October 6, 2016. Grants will be awarded before December 31, 2016.

Information about two technical assistance webinars for potential applicants (August 30th and September 8th) can be found on the Applicant Information page of the Preschool Development Grants -- Pay For Success website. See also, a related ED blog post and the announcement on http://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/earlylearning/index.html

113. New Guidance and Data Related to Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - August 26, 2016

The following two new reports related to infants with possible congenital Zika virus are now available online. Additional resources for families and for healthcare providers can be found on CDC's Zika website.

  • Update: Interim Guidance for the Evaluation and Management of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection-United States, August 2016 (Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 65(33), August 26, 2016) - This revised guidance updates recommendations for the initial evaluation and testing of infants with confirmed or possible congenital exposure to Zika infection, and establishes recommendations for the outpatient management and follow-up of infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection, with or without apparent associated birth defects. The guidance also emphasizes that families and caregivers will need ongoing psychosocial support and assistance with coordination of care.
  • Estimating the number of infants that may be born with congenital Zika virus infection and microcephaly following the Zika outbreak in Puerto Rico, 2016 (Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Pediatrics, Online First, August 19, 2016) - In this report, CDC scientists estimate that 5,900-10,300 pregnant women might be infected during the Zika virus outbreak in Puerto Rico in 2016, in the absence of effective interventions. Of these, they estimated that 100-270 infections might lead to microcephaly in infants between mid-2016 and mid-2017. These estimates underscore the importance of the urgent actions being taken in Puerto Rico to prevent Zika virus infection during pregnancy and the need to plan for medical and supportive services for families affected by Zika.

114. Journal of Early Intervention Abstract Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - OnlineFirst August 11, 2016

An abstract of the following article is now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent

A Brief Coaching Intervention for Teaching Naturalistic Strategies to Parents

Justin D. Lane, Jennifer R. Ledford, Collin Shepley, Theologia K. Mataras, Kevin M. Ayres, and Alicia B. Davis

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

115. The Pyramid Equity Project - Addressing Preschool Suspension and Expulsion

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - August 15, 2016

The U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services recently announced a $1 million investment in the Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) to implement the Pyramid Equity Project, which will develop and disseminate an effective approach for the prevention of suspension, expulsion, and discipline disparities in early learning programs. Specifically, the Pyramid Equity Project will develop tools, materials, and procedures to explicitly address implicit bias, implement culturally responsive practices, and use data systems to understand potential discipline equity issues. For more information see:

Additional information is available at http://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/earlylearning/index.html

116. Joint Letter Supporting Family Engagement in Early Learning

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - August 1, 2016

Education Secretary John B. King and Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell have released a Joint Letter (August 2016) supporting the Departments' recent Policy Statement on Family Engagement (May 2016). The Departments aim to support and encourage states, districts, schools, and public and private early childhood programs, including child care and Head Start, to take action to develop and implement effective family engagement policies and practices.

This letter and related resources can be found at http://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/earlylearning/index.html.

117. New Parent Resources Available on HealthyChildren.org

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - July 21, 2016

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has added two new articles to their online parent resource website, HealthyChildren.org. Both of the new articles feature milestone checklists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) "Learn the Signs. Act Early." program.

118. Including Relationship-Based Care Practices in Infant-Toddler Care

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - July 26, 2016

A new brief, Including Relationship-Based Care Practices in Infant-Toddler Care: Implications for Practice and Policy (2016), describes the research supporting a focus on relationships in infant and toddler care, emphasizing two specific relationship-based care supports: primary caregiving and continuity of care. The brief also presents practice considerations for adopting or enhancing relationship-based care practices, and discusses the implications of state standards for incorporating these practices into programs that serve infants and toddlers.

119. New Guidance on Education for Homeless Children Released

Source: U.S. Department of Education - July 27, 2016

New guidance is available to assist state and local partners in implementing the provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) for supporting homeless children and youth, including preschool-aged homeless children. The guidance clarifies requirements of Title VII-B of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, which was re-authorized in December 2015 by the ESSA. The McKinney-Vento Act includes, among other things, new or changed requirements focused on preschool-aged homeless children, including clarification that local liaisons must ensure that these children and their families have access to and receive services, if eligible, under preschool programs administered by the local education agency (LEA), including Head Start, Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities), and other LEA-administered preschool programs.

The new guidance is part of a series of guidance documents that is being released related to new provisions in the ESSA.

120. Parenting Matters: Supporting Parents of Children Ages 0-8

Source: National Academies of Medicine - July 20, 2016

The National Academies of Medicine convened an ad hoc committee of experts, Committee on Supporting the Parents of Young Children, to examine the state of the science with respect to:

  • parenting knowledge, attitudes, and practices that support positive parent-child interactions and healthy development of children ages 0-8;
  • strategies for supporting parents and helping them engage in parenting practices associated with healthy child development;
  • barriers and facilitators to strengthening parenting capacity and parents' participation in effective programs and services, and;
  • gaps in the research on parenting.

The Committee has just released its findings and recommendations in a new report, Parenting Matters: Supporting Parents of Children Ages 0-8 (July 2016), which is intended to serve as a road-map for the future of parenting and family support policies, practices, and research in the United States across the private and public sectors within the health, human services, and education systems.

121. International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - New Issue Available

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - June 2016

The June 2016 issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) (Volume 8, Issue 1) is now available online and freely accessible. INT-JECSE is an open-access, peer reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. View the Table of Contents with abstracts and links to the full-text articles.

122. Pathways to Prosperity: Growing a Multilingual Teacher Workforce

Source: New America Foundation - Retrieved July 11, 2016

A new report, Pathways to Prosperity: Growing a Multilingual Teacher Workforce (June 2016), looks at the growing linguistic diversity among America's youngest learners and the need to train and hire more multilingual teachers. It provides recommendations for supporting the country's many multilingual paraprofessionals to advance professionally and become fully licensed teachers.

123. Upcoming DEC Position Statement on Child Maltreatment - Call for Comments

Source: Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Early Childhood - July 1, 2016

The Council for Exceptional Children's Division for Early Childhood (DEC) has drafted its first position statement on child maltreatment and is accepting general feedback, questions, and comments about the position statement until July 22, 2016. See the full announcement for more information. To access the statement and provide input, go to http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/2781497/DEC-Position-Statement-Review. Please feel free to share this survey with friends and colleagues who are interested or have expertise in supporting young children with disabilities and maltreatment.

124. Journal of Early Intervention Abstract Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention, Online First - June 20, 2016

An abstract of the following forthcoming article is now available at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent. OnlineFirst provides access to articles before they are scheduled to appear in print.

Early Intervention for Children With Hearing Loss: Information Parents Receive About Supporting Children's Language

Kalli B. Decker and Claire D. Vallotton

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

125. Credentialing in the Early Care and Education Field

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Early Child Development - June 29, 2016

A new report, spearheaded by the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services, examines comprehensive career pathway systems in the early childhood education (ECE) field. The report provides a national landscape of states' requirements for ECE staff related to credentialing, introduces a career pathways framework in use by several federal agencies, and highlights five states at various points in the development of ECE career pathways. It also offers recommendations for states and the field as they work to design strong, comprehensive pathway systems intended to meet the skill, employment, and advancement needs of individuals entering the ECE field. See Early Learning Career Pathways Initiative: Credentialing in the Early Care and Education Field (June 2016).

126. 2014 Head Start and Early Head Start Profiles

Source: CLASP - June 29, 2016

CLASP recently released their 2014 Head Start and Early Head Start Profiles. The profiles provide 2014 data on participating children, families, and staff in all Early Head Start, Head Start, and Migrant Head Start programs in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The data is derived from the Program Information Report (PIR) that all Head Start grantees complete.

127. Guidance on the Every Student Succeeds Act - Children in Foster Care / Engaging Stakeholders

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - June 23, 2016

The U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services have released guidance to states, school districts and child welfare agencies on new provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) for supporting children in foster care. The U.S. Education of Department also has released a letter stressing the importance of meaningful stakeholder engagement as states and local school districts transition to the ESSA.

Additional guidance related to the ESSA is available at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/index.html.

128. Invitation to Comment - Preschool Pay for Success Feasibility Pilot

Source: U.S. Department of Education - June 24, 2016

The U.S. Department of Education is inviting comments on a proposed information collection request related to Preschool Pay for Success Feasibility Pilot, a competition that seeks to award grants for feasibility studies to measure the viability of preschool Pay For Success (PFS) projects. The Department is interested in comments that help assess the impact of its information collection requirements and minimize the public's reporting burden. Comments must be received by July 25, 2016. To learn more, see the Federal Register Notice.

129. New Joint ED-HHS Report on Importance of Supporting Early Learning Workforce

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - June 14, 2016

The U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services have released a report highlighting the importance of supporting the early learning workforce - most of whom are women - not only to improve the quality of early learning programs, but also to ensure fair pay so that they can support their own families. The report summarizes the research base and includes recommendations for reaching pay parity across all early learning settings.

Go to http://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/earlylearning/index.html for more information. The report was released at the United State of Women Summit on June 14, 2016.

130. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention - June 2016

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/38/2

What Equivocal Data From Single Case Comparison Studies Reveal About Evidence-Based Practices in Early Childhood Special Education

Jennifer R. Ledford, Erin E. Barton, Jessica K. Hardy, Katie Elam, Jordan Seabolt, Meredith Shanks, M. L. Hemmeter, and Ann Kaiser

Early Intervention for Children With Behavior Problems in Summer Settings: Results From a Pilot Evaluation in Head Start Preschools

Katie C. Hart, Paulo A. Graziano, Kristine M. Kent, Aparajita Kuriyan, Alexis Garcia, Madison Rodriguez, and William E. Pelham, Jr.

Vocabulary of Toddlers Who Are Late Talkers

Michelle MacRoy-Higgins, Valerie L. Shafer, Katlin J. Fahey, and Elyssa R. Kaden

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

131. A First Look: Key Data Highlights on Equity and Opportunity Gaps in Our Nation's Public Schools

Source: Office for Civil Rights - June 7, 2016

Initial results from the 2013-14 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) have been published in a new report, A First Look: Key Data Highlights on Equity and Opportunity Gaps in Our Nation's Public Schools (June 2016). The report includes information on suspension and expulsion from public preschool (page 3) and on the availability of free or partial-payment preschool (page 5).

132. Funding Opportunity - National Comprehensive Center on Improving Literacy for Students with Disabilities

Source: U.S. Department of Education - June 8, 2016

A notice inviting applications for a new award to establish a National Comprehensive Center on Improving Literacy for Students with Disabilities (the Center) was recently published in the Federal Register. The Center will support children in early childhood education programs through high school who are at risk of not attaining full literacy skills due to a disability. It will be administered jointly by the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) and the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE). The application deadline is July 25, 2016.

133. Joint Statement and Toolkit on Dual Language Learners in Early Childhood Programs

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - June 2, 2016

A new joint Policy Statement on Supporting the Development of Children Who Are Dual Language Learners in Early Childhood Programs was released by U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services on June 2, 2016. The policy statement provides recommendations for early childhood programs and states to promote the development and learning of young children, birth to age five, who are learning two or more languages at the same time.

A corresponding Dual Language Learners Toolkit from the Office of Head Start has also been released. It provides resources on supporting the learning and development of dual language learners at home, in early learning settings, and in the community. It is organized into sections for: (1) administrators and managers; (2) teachers, caregivers, and family services staff; and (3) families.

In addition to these new federal resources, see this fact sheet from the White House, FACT SHEET: Supporting Dual Language Learners in Early Learning Settings (June 2, 2016), which highlights plans to support young DLLs that were presented by other organizations during a recent meeting hosted by the White House Domestic Policy Council, Too Small to Fail, and the Invest in US campaign.

134. Upcoming! Early Intervention Webinar on Engaging Families to Focus on Intervention Strategies

Source: Military Families Learning Network - June 3, 2016

On June 23, 2016 at 11 a.m. EST the Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) is hosting a free 90 minute webinar entitled Engaging Families to Focus on Intervention Strategies, presented by Dr. Carol Trivette. The webinar will help Early Intervention (EI) providers, private therapists, and other professionals working with young children with disabilities think about their interactions with the child's family and how those interactions strengthen a family's ability to support their child's learning. To register and for more information go to https://learn.extension.org/events/2587.

The MFLN also offers recorded Family Development Webinars for EI professionals that provide free continuing education (CE) credits in several states. For questions, please contact Robyn DiPietro-Wells at rrwells@illinois.edu

135. School Readiness Findings from the Chicago Pay for Success (PFS) Project

Source: Institute for Child Success and SRI International - May 23, 2016

A recent evaluation of the Chicago Pay for Success (PFS) project, which expands the city's Child Parent Center (CPC) early education model, found that the first cohort of participating children met the initiative's goals for improved kindergarten readiness. Future evaluations will report on whether special education placement is reduced and whether there is an increase in third-grade literacy for participating children. A blog post from the Institute for Child Success, Chicago in Context: Considering Pay for Success to Improve Special Education, discusses the findings in more detail and addresses concerns that exist about using reduced special education placement as an outcome metric for PFS projects. For the complete evaluation report, see Evaluation of Kindergarten Readiness in Five Child-Parent Centers: Report for 2014-15 (April 2016).

136. Journal of Early Intervention Abstract Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention, Online First - May 23, 2016

An abstract of the following new forthcoming article is now available at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent.

What Equivocal Data From Single Case Comparison Studies Reveal About Evidence-Based Practices in Early Childhood Special Education

Jennifer R. Ledford, Erin E. Barton, Jessica K. Hardy, Katie Elam, Jordan Seabolt, Meredith Shanks, M. L. Hemmeter, and Ann Kaiser

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

137. New OSEP Memo on Response to Intervention (RTI) and Preschool Services

Source: Office of Special Education Programs - April 29, 2016

The Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) has published a new memo, OSEP Memorandum 16-07 (April 29, 2016), which clarifies that states and local education agencies (LEAs) have an obligation under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to ensure that evaluations of all children suspected of having a disability, including evaluations of 3-, 4-, or 5-year-old children enrolled in preschool programs, are not delayed or denied because of implementation of a Response to Intervention (RTI) strategy. Other OSEP Memos, Dear Colleague Letters and Policy Letters are also publicly available online. A subset of OSEP guidance documents related to the early childhood provisions of the IDEA (Part C and Part B, Section 619) can be accessed on the ECTA Center Web site.

138. Journal of Early Intervention Abstract Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention, Online First - May 13, 2016

An abstract of the following new forthcoming article is now available at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent.

Early Intervention for Children With Behavior Problems in Summer Settings: Results From a Pilot Evaluation in Head Start Preschools

Katie C. Hart, Paulo A. Graziano, Kristine M. Kent, Aparajita Kuriyan, Alexis Garcia, Madison Rodriguez, and William E. Pelham, Jr.

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

139. Follow-up Video - Getty's Door to Inclusion

Source: Desired Results Access Project - May 9, 2016

Last year the Desired Results Access Project produced a video entitled "Getty's Window To Inclusion: The Chance To Be Just Like Any Other Kid," which showed how Getty, a young girl who cannot physically be near other children because of health issues, was able to virtually participate in preschool. A new, follow-up video has just been released.

  • Getty's Door to Inclusion shows Getty virtually attending a typical kindergarten classroom. It illustrates the importance of having consistent and high expectations for all children, sound communication strategies, and effective parent-teacher collaboration. It provides important messages for all those interested in early childhood and elementary school inclusion, for all current and future early childhood educators, and for families who are looking for solutions for their children who cannot attend school due to health issues.

Both videos are available in the Desired Results Access Project Video Library (at the top of the page, select the "General Interest" tab). As with all Desired Results videos, they can be viewed online or downloaded at no cost for use in educational and professional development activities.

140. Forthcoming Journal of Early Intervention Abstract Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention, Online First - April 15, 2016

An abstract of the following new forthcoming article is now available at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent. OnlineFirst provides access to articles before they are scheduled to appear in print.

Vocabulary of Toddlers Who Are Late Talkers

Michelle MacRoy-Higgins, Valerie L. Shafer, Katlin J. Fahey, and Elyssa R. Kaden

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

141. Five Videos Illustrate Family Guided Routines Based Intervention

Source: Family Guided Routines Based Intervention, Florida State University - April 4, 2016

The following five new videos on Family Guided Routines Based Intervention are now available online:

These videos were produced collaboratively by Juliann Woods with Family Guided Routines Based Intervention and the Distance Mentoring Model at Florida State University, Cindy Weigel and Melissa Schnurr from the Iowa Department of Education, videographer Larry Edelman, and, most importantly, families and Early ACCESS providers in Iowa.

142. Expelling Expulsion Fact Sheet

Source: Pyramid Model Consortium - April 8, 2016

A fact sheet summarizing current research findings about suspension and expulsion of children, particularly children of color, from early childhood settings was recently posted on the Pyramid Model Consortium website. The fact sheet includes recommendations and suggestions for using the Pyramid Model to address this national problem. See Fact Sheet: Expelling Expulsion: Using the Pyramid Model to Prevent Suspensions, Expulsions, and Disciplinary Inequities in Early Childhood Programs.

143. Eleven New Videos to Support Early Care and Education Practitioners

Source: California's Desired Results Access Project - April 4, 2016

Eleven new videos of toddlers and preschoolers participating in typical routines and activities were recently added to the Desired Results Access Project Video Library. The videos are meant to provide early interventionists, early childhood special educators, and other early care and education practitioners opportunities to practice skills such as observation, documentation, and assessment. As with all Desired Results videos, they can be viewed online or downloaded for use in educational and professional development activities at no cost (select Practice Clips).

New clips Featuring Toddlers:

  • Tania Playing in the Yard (3:33) - Tania demonstrates a variety of gross motor, communication, and social skills.
  • Ben at Dinnertime (3:04) - Ben demonstrates a variety of social, communication, and mealtime skills.
  • Nicholas at Story Time (2:39) - Nicholas demonstrates a variety of fine motor, social, and early literacy skills.
  • Crystal Moving Around (3:26) - Crystal demonstrates a variety of movement, social, and communication skills.
  • Max at Mealtime (3:41) - Max demonstrates a variety of social, communication, and self-feeding skills.
  • Severina Plays Knock Knock (1:31) - Severina demonstrates a variety of social, communication, and fine motor skills.
  • Alec's Morning Routine (3:53) - Alec demonstrates a variety of self-help, social, and communication skills.

Clips Featuring Preschoolers:

  • Cody Plays with Glue and Wood (3:04) - Cody demonstrates a variety of fine motor skills.
  • Cody on the Playground (3:58) - Cody demonstrates a variety of gross motor skills.
  • Angel at the Computer (2:53) - Angel demonstrates a variety of computer skills.
  • Angel at Lunch (3:33) - Angel demonstrates a variety of mealtime and self-help skills.

144. Head Start Program Fact Sheets for 2014

Source: CLASP - April 5, 2016

Each year, Head Start programs are required to submit a Program Information Report (PIR) to the Office of Head Start on participating children, pregnant women, and families, as well as the staff serving the Head Start population. The following new fact sheets use information reported through the PIR to describe the children and families served in Head Start, Early Head Start, and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start and the services provided to them during the 2013-2014 program year.

145. Child Care Assistance Spending and Participation in 2014

Source: CLASP - April 1, 2016

Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) funds, as well as funds from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, are used by states to improve child care and to deliver child care assistance for low-income families. A new brief, Child Care Assistance Spending and Participation in 2014 (March 2016), analyzes national trends and 50-state data for spending and participation in CCDBG-and TANF-funded child care programs during fiscal year 2014. It finds that overall federal and state spending for child care assistance and participation in CCDBG-funded child care are at historically low levels. Expenditures in CCDBG and TANF combined have been almost flat since 2012 and the number of children served in CCDBG has been steadily declining since 2010.

146. Evidence of Impacts and Economic Returns from National, State, and Local Preschool Programs

Source: RAND Corporation - March 29, 2016

A new report examines the research evidence available to answer the following questions: (1) Do high-quality preschool programs produce favorable effects for participating children and their families, what are the magnitudes of the impacts, and how long do the beneficial effects last? and (2) Is there evidence of a positive return on investment when public dollars are used to pay for such programs? The report draws on evidence from rigorous evaluations of full-scale U.S. preschool programs implemented at the national, state, and local levels. The evidence of impacts for universal versus targeted programs and for programs of varying intensity is included.

Full citation: Karoly, Lynn A. and Anamarie Auger. (2016). Informing Investments in Preschool Quality and Access in Cincinnati: Evidence of Impacts and Economic Returns from National, State, and Local Preschool Programs. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation.

147. National Portrait of Hispanic Children in Need

Source: National Research Center on Hispanic Children and Families - March 18, 2016

A new brief, National Portrait of Hispanic Children in Need (February 2016), examines the number and household circumstances of Latino children currently living in, or near, poverty in the United States. It includes information on the proportion of these children who receive services from the social service programs intended for them. The brief uses nationally representative data from the 2014 American Community Survey. An infographic provides highlights of key findings.

148. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: Journal of Early Intervention - March 2016; Vol. 38, No. 1

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/38/1

Internet-Based Parent-Implemented Intervention for Young Children with Autism: A Pilot Study

Hedda Meadan, Melinda R. Snodgrass, Lori E. Meyer, Kim W. Fisher, Moon Y. Chung, and James W. Halle

Peer Modeling of Commenting During Small Group Direct Instruction for Academic Behaviors

Sarah Urlacher, Mark Wolery, and Jennifer R. Ledford

Early Language Milestones and Specific Language Impairment

Johanna M. Rudolph and Laurence B. Leonard

Family Quality of Life for Families in Early Intervention in Spain

Joana M. Mas, Natasha Baques, Anna Balcells-Balcells, Mariona Dalmau, Climent Gine, Marta Gràcia, and Rosa Vilaseca

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.

149. Grant Opportunities from the U.S. Department of Education

150. Applications for New Awards - Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs

Source: Institute of Education Sciences - March 8, 2016

The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) has published a notice in the Federal Register inviting applications for FY 2017 awards under the Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs. These grants are designed to provide national leadership in expanding fundamental knowledge and understanding of (1) developmental and school readiness outcomes for infants and toddlers with or at risk for disability, and (2) education outcomes for all students from early childhood education through postsecondary and adult education. Application dates for the various grant opportunities can be found at the bottom of the notice.

151. Proposed Rule Promoting Equity in the IDEA - Comment Period Now Open

Source: U.S. Department of Education - March 2, 2016

The proposed rule that would amend regulations under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) was published in the Federal Register on March 2, 2016. Comments are being accepted until May 16, 2016 (click on the green box that says "Submit a Formal Comment" at the top of the page). With the goal of promoting equity in the IDEA, the regulations would:

  • establish a standard methodology States must use to determine whether significant disproportionality based on race and ethnicity is occurring in the State and in its local educational agencies (LEAs);
  • clarify that States must address significant disproportionality in the incidence, duration, and type of disciplinary actions, including suspensions and expulsions, using the same statutory remedies required to address significant disproportionality in the identification and placement of children with disabilities;
  • clarify requirements for the review and revision of policies, practices, and procedures when significant disproportionality is found; and,
  • require that LEAs identify and address the factors contributing to significant disproportionality as part of comprehensive coordinated early intervening services (comprehensive CEIS) and allow such services for children from age 3 through grade 12, with and without disabilities.

152. Effectiveness of Early Childhood Education Programs on Reducing Behavior Problems

Source: Journal of School Psychology - March 1, 2016

The following article was recently awarded Article of the Year for 2015 by the National Association of School Psychologists. It is being made freely available online by Elsevier until April 22, 2016:

Schindler, H. S., Kholoptseva, J., Oh, S. S., Yoshikawa, H., Duncan, G. J., Magnuson, K. A., & Shonkoff, J. P. (2015). Maximizing the potential of early childhood education to prevent externalizing behavior problems: A meta-analysis. Journal of School Psychology, 53(3), 243-263.

This meta-analysis (N = 31) examined the effectiveness of early childhood education programs on reducing externalizing behavior problems (EBPs). Programs with no clear focus on social and emotional development (level 1 programs) did not significantly reduce EBPs. Programs with a clear, but broad focus on social emotional development (level 2 programs) demonstrated a modest decrease in EBPs, and programs that intensely targeted social and emotional development (level 3 programs) were associated with an even more significant reduction in EBPs. The most promising effects came from level 3 programs that focused on child social skills training.

153. Proposed Rule to Address Widespread Disparities in Special Education

Source: U.S. Department of Education - February 23, 2016

In a recent press release, the U.S. Department of Education announced a proposed rule that would require all states to use a standard approach to measure whether children from any racial or ethnic group are being identified for special education services, placed outside the regular classroom, or disciplined at markedly higher rates than their peers. The proposed rule would likely result in more districts being classified as having "significant disproportionality" under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which means they would be required to set aside 15% of their IDEA Part B funds to provide comprehensive coordinated early intervening services. Under the proposed rule, the allowable uses of the 15% set aside would be broadened include services for children with and without disabilities from ages 3 through grade 12. See an unofficial copy of the proposed rule here.

154. Science Achievement Gaps Begin Early and Persist Over Time

Source: American Educational Research Association - February 23, 2016

A new study published by the American Educational Research Association (AERA) found that large general knowledge gaps between racial/ethnic minority and white children and low-income and high-income children were already present at kindergarten entry, and these gaps persisted over time. The researchers analyzed data on over 7,750 children and found that of the children entering kindergarten with low levels of general knowledge, 62% were struggling in science in third grade and 54% were struggling in eighth grade. They also found that the gaps were largely explained by modifiable factors. They suggest that these findings underscore the importance of ensuring access to high-quality early learning experiences, particularly for children who are at risk. For more information, read the press release here.

155. Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention

Source: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management - February 9, 2016

A new bi-annual peer-reviewed online journal, the Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (JEHDI) (launched February 9, 2016), provides free access to articles on evidence-based practice, standards of care, and research related to all aspects of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI). The journal is a publication of the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM), which provides extensive resources for families of young children who are deaf or hard of hearing and for those who provide their services.

156. Disparate Access: Head Start and CCDBG Data by Race and Ethnicity

Source: CLASP - February 17, 2016

A new analysis from CLASP, Disparate Access: Head Start and CCDBG Data by Race and Ethnicity (February 2016), finds that access to Head Start preschool, Early Head Start, and child care funded through the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is limited for all eligible children and even more so for particular racial and ethnic groups and in particular states. Some key findings include:

  • Less than 15 percent of eligible children are receiving CCDBG services. Of these, eligible Hispanic or Latino children have sharply lower access to CCDBG than eligible children of other backgrounds.
  • No more than 6 percent of eligible children in any racial/ethnic group have access to Early Head Start (EHS).
  • Fewer than half of all eligible children have access to Head Start preschool programs, however access does not appear to be as significantly impacted by race/ethnicity.
  • Access by eligible children to Head Start, EHS, and CCDBG varies tremendously across states.

157. Supporting the School Readiness and Success of Young African American Boys

Source: Office of Head Start, National, Center for Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness - Retrieved February 12, 2016

The goal of the Supporting the School Readiness and Success of Young African American Boys Project (2013-2015), was to help Head Start and other early education programs promote culturally responsive, strength-based learning environments for young African American boys. In the course of the project, materials were developed, professional development was conducted, and a new resource, Supporting the School Readiness and Success of Young African American Boys Project: Reflections on a Culturally Responsive Strength-Based Approach, evolved. This resource is meant to help a variety of different audiences reflect and think about how to best support young African American boys in early learning settings.

158. Video Parent Feedback Program Improves School Readiness of Children in Poverty

Source: National Institutes of Health - January 28, 2016

The Video Interaction Project (VIP) involves videoing parents as they read and play with their children during routine checkups, reviewing the videos with parents, highlighting positive interactions, and giving parents a book or toy and a copy of the video to take home. A recent study involving 675 parents and their newborn babies found that the children of VIP participants had better attention and play skills and reduced hyperactivity and aggression at age 3 than children in the control group. For children in the highest risk families, hyperactivity was reduced by more than half. The authors suggest that reducing aggression and hyperactivity in young children is extremely important, because the ability to behave in school is crucial for learning and educational achievement. Read the full press release here.

159. The Arts in Early Childhood: Social and Emotional Benefits of Arts Participation

Source: National Endowment for the Arts - Retrieved January 22, 2016

A recently published report, The Arts in Early Childhood: Social and Emotional Benefits of Arts Participation: A Literature Review and Gap-Analysis (2000-2015) (December 2015), reviews the existing research on the potential benefits of arts participation for children from birth to eight years old. The studies reviewed looked at typically developing children, as well as children with autism spectrum disorder. The report finds that arts participation in early childhood is strongly linked to:

  • Social skills development: helping, sharing, caring, empathy, and the capacity for other kinds of healthy interpersonal behavior; and
  • Emotion regulation ability: mood control and positive changes in affect and expression.

160. Inclusion by Design Impact Awards

Source: Global Partnership on Children with Disabilities, Physical Activity and Sport Task Force - January 12, 2016

Participation in physical activities and sports impacts overall growth and development and enhances quality of life in childhood. However, children with disabilities are 4.5 times less likely to engage in physical activities and have higher rates of obesity than children without disabilities, increasing their risk of long-term secondary conditions. The recently launched Inclusion by Design Impact Awards are designed to encourage and identify innovative approaches to including children with disabilities in all forms of physical education, sport, recreation, and play. The deadline for applying is January 31, 2016, 12:00 PM GMT. See the launch announcement here. An application form is available online.

161. Early Childhood Homelessness in the United States: 50-State Profile

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - January 8, 2016

Today, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) released Early Childhood Homelessness in the United States: 50-State Profile (January 2016), which provides a snapshot of data available for young children experiencing homelessness in each state. Quality early childhood education programs can help reduce the risks associated with homelessness by supporting children's learning and development in safe, stable and nurturing environments; however many vulnerable young children experiencing homelessness in the United States lack access to quality programs. This new resource can be used as a tool for communities in planning to meet the needs of these children.

162. International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - New Issue Available

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - January 7, 2015

The December 2015 issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is now available online. INT-JECSE is an open-access, peer reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. View the Table of Contents with abstracts and links to the full-text articles.

163. Increases for Part C and Section 619 in Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016

Source: U.S. Department of Education - Retrieved December 31, 2015

On December 18, 2015, President Obama signed into law the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016 (P.L. 114-113), making appropriations for FY 2016 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and related agencies through September 30, 2016. See Budget News for education funding, including:

This article from CLASP highlights additional funds for child care and early education, including:

  • A $326 million increase for the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG).
  • A $570 million increase for Head Start, which includes $135 million increase for Early Head Start - Child Care Partnerships.
  • Flat funding for the current preschool development grants programs, which allows for a third year of funding for grantees.

164. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: Journal of Early Intervention - December 2015; Vol. 37, No. 4

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/37/4

Training Teachers to Enhance the Play Skills of Young Children With Developmental Disabilities During Outdoor Time by Embedding Instructional Interactions

Christian A. Martin, Erik Drasgow, and James W. Halle

Using Video Modeling, Prompting, and Behavior-Specific Praise to Increase Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity for Young Children With Down Syndrome

Elyse K. Adamo, Jenny Wu, Mark Wolery, Mary Louise Hemmeter, Jennifer R. Ledford, and Erin E. Barton

Mediational Analyses of the Effects of Responsive Teaching on the Developmental Functioning of Preschool Children With Disabilities

Ozcan Karaaslan and Gerald Mahoney

Systematic Review of Engagement in Culturally Adapted Parent Training for Disruptive Behavior

Ashley M. Butler and Courtney Titus

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

165. Critical Competencies for Infant-Toddler Educators

Source: ZERO TO THREE's Workforce Innovations Team - Retrieved December 28, 2015

A new resource, ZERO TO THREE Critical Competencies for Infant-Toddler Educators (2015), describes the essential skills educators need to optimize the social-emotional, cognitive, and language and literacy development of infants and toddlers. The Critical Competencies:

  • support educators who work in group settings (center-based and family child care homes) with infants, toddlers, or both;
  • focus on pedagogy - the method and practice of teaching;
  • feature considerations for working with high-needs populations;
  • offer considerations for supporting multi-language learners; and
  • build on professional criteria for the early childhood field, giving consolidated and easily understood guidance.

166. Part C 2015 Tipping Points Survey Results

Source: IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association - Retrieved November 30, 2015

The IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association (ITCA) recently posted the results of its 2015 survey related to Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) online. 2015 ITCA Tipping Points Survey - Part C Implementation: State Challenges and Responses summarizes findings from the survey, which is used to help track emerging issues related to eligibility, finance, and decisions regarding continued participation in the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA). Forty-nine of the fifty-six states and jurisdictions responded to the survey.

167. Systemwide Solutions to Improve Early Intervention for Developmental–Behavioral Concerns

Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved November 20, 2015

A new article in Pediatrics, Systemwide Solutions to Improve Early Intervention for Developmental-Behavioral Concerns (November 2015), proposes that every U.S. state needs: 1) a family-friendly screening and care coordination entity; 2) comprehensive, tiered, and equitable assessments for "at-risk" or referred children; 3) universal access to high-quality early learning or preschool programs; and 4) continuous accountability for the early detection process from birth to 5 years, including a low-cost, outcome-based metric for kindergarten readiness.

Full citation: Marks, K. P., Griffen, A. K., Herrera, P., Macias, M. M., Rice, C. E., & Robinson, C. (2015). Systemwide Solutions to Improve Early Intervention for Developmental–Behavioral Concerns. Pediatrics, 136(6). http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2015-1723

For more information on developmental-behavioral monitoring and training, visit Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive!, a coordinated federal effort to encourage healthy child development, universal developmental and behavioral screening for children, and support for the families and providers who care for them.

168. Report Finds Child Care Workers Aren't Paid Enough to Make Ends Meet

Source: Economic Policy Institute - November 5, 2015

A new report from the Economic Policy Institute, Child Care Workers Aren't Paid Enough to Make Ends Meet (November 2015) examines child care workers' job quality, including how much they earn, whether they receive benefits on the job, and whether they and their families are able to make ends meet. Key findings include:

  • Child care workers are 95.6 percent female, and are disproportionately workers of color.
  • Child care workers receive very low pay.
  • Child care workers rarely receive job-based benefits.
  • Child care workers have a harder time making ends meet than workers in other occupations.
  • Over one-third (36.7 percent) of child care workers live in families with income below twice the poverty line, compared with 21.1 percent of workers in other occupations.
  • Many preschool and child care workers cannot afford child care for their own children

169. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: Journal of Early Intervention - September 2015; Vol. 37, No. 3

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/37/3

Long-Term Effects of a Parent-Based Language Intervention on Language Outcomes and Working Memory for Late-Talking Toddlers

Anke Buschmann, Bettina Multhauf, Marcus Hasselhorn, and Joachim Pietz

Assessment of Quality for Inclusive Programs in Greek Preschool Classrooms

Aristea Fyssa and Anastasia Vlachou

A Comprehensive Inclusion Program for Kindergarten Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Diane M. Sainato, Rebecca S. Morrison, Sunhwa Jung, Judah Axe, and Patricia A. Nixon

Accuracy of Knowledge of Child Development in Mothers of Children Receiving Early Intervention Services

Debra H. Zand, Katherine J. Pierce, Margaret W. Bultas, Stephen Edward McMillin, Rolanda Maxim Gott, and Jennifer Wilmott

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

170. 6 New Videos from the Results Matter Video Library

Source: Results Matter - October 23, 2015

Results Matter, a program of the Colorado Department of Education, has posted six new videos in their Results Matter Video Library. Two of the videos focus on the uses of authentic assessment and Teaching Strategies GOLD in child care programs and are posted in the Practices Here and There section of the library. The other four videos are of infants and toddlers participating in typical activities in a child care program and are posted in the Clips for Practicing Observation, Documentation and Assessment Skills section of the library.

  • The Benefits of Using Authentic Assessment in a Child Care Program (Runtime: 2:23) The director of a child care program discusses and illustrates the benefits of using authentic assessment in a child care program.
  • The Results Matter Expansion Project Step By Step (Runtime: 6:52) This video illustrates how the Colorado Department of Education's Results Matter Expansion Project supported a child care center to begin using Teaching Strategies GOLD. The director of the program and two teachers discuss and illustrate the transition process and the benefits for children, families, and teachers.
  • Gabby (Runtime: 1:38) Gabby, a toddler, demonstrates a variety of physical skills.
  • Gabby and Nicholas (Runtime: 2:20) Toddlers Gabby and Nicholas demonstrate a variety of cognitive, social, and physical skills as they engage with objects and with one another.
  • Lilly (Runtime: 1:38) Lilly, just learning to crawl, demonstrates physical and communication body as she interacts with materials, peers, and a caregiver.
  • Profitt (Runtime: 3:43) Profitt, a toddler, demonstrates a variety of physical skills as he explores his classroom and materials.

All Results Matters videos can be viewed online and downloaded at no cost for use in educational and professional development activities.

171. Funding Opportunity - Preparation of Special Education, Early Intervention, and Related Services Leadership Personnel

Source: U.S. Department of Education - October 9, 2015

On October 9, 2015 the U.S. Department of Education published a notice in the Federal Register inviting applications for new fiscal year (FY) 2016 awards for Personnel Development to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities: Preparation of Special Education, Early Intervention, and Related Services Leadership Personnel (CFDA No. 84.325D). The deadline for transmittal of applications is December 8, 2015. The application package and additional information for the 84.325D competition is posted at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/osepprep/applicant.html#84325d. It can also be accessed at http://www.grants.gov/ (enter the CFDA number in the search box).

172. Program for Parents Helps Sustain Learning Acquired by Children in Head Start

Source: National Institutes of Health - October 20, 2015

Findings from a research study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) suggest that the Research Based, Developmentally Informed Parent (REDI-P) program helps young children retain the literacy skills and positive learning behaviors acquired in Head Start through to the end of the kindergarten year. REDI-P is centered on home visits from educational counselors, who provide parents with materials and coaching to help reinforce the social and academic lessons that the children learn in Head Start classrooms. Researchers compared children in REDI-P with a group of similar children who received some educational materials but did not participate in REDI-P. The children in REDI-P showed significantly higher retention of literacy and learning skills and sustained improvements in academic performance and social interaction. Read the full press release here.

173. McKinney-Vento and IDEA: Serving Children with Disabilities Who are Homeless

Source: Office of Special Education Programs and National Center for Homeless Education - October 8, 2015

The following three new briefs from the National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) were highlighted on a recent national webinar hosted by NCHE and Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP):

174. High Quality Child Care Is Out of Reach for Working Families

Source: Economic Policy Institute - October 6, 2015

Close to 11 million children younger than age 5 in the U.S. spend an average of 36 hours a week in child care. A new report from the Economic Policy Institute, High Quality Child Care Is Out of Reach for Working Families (October 2015), examines child care costs against a variety of benchmarks - including the cost of college tuition, the Department of Health and Human Services' official affordability threshold of 10 percent or less of a family's income, and median family incomes. The report finds that high quality child care is unaffordable for working families, particularly for minimum-wage workers. Annual child care costs for an infant and a 4-year-old range from $13,245 in Atlanta to $29,478 in Boston. In 33 states and the District of Columbia, infant care costs exceed the average cost of in-state college tuition at public 4-year institutions.

175. IDEA State Performance Plan/Annual Performance Report 2015 Indicator Analyses

Source: U.S. Department of Education - October 7, 2015

Two new reports from the U.S. Department of Education provide a national quantitative picture of the implementation of the Individuals with disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Part B and Part C. The reports summarize data from the FFY 2013 Annual Performance Reports (APRs) and amended State Performance Plans (SPPs), which were submitted by states to the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) in 2015.

  • Part C SPP/APR 2015 Indicator Analyses - In this report, Indicator 11 is a new indicator for FFY 2013 that requires states to develop a multi-year State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP) for improving results for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families.
  • Part B SPP/APR 2015 Indicator Analyses - In this report, Indicators of particular interest to the early childhood field include: Indicator 6: Preschool Least Restrictive Environment, Indicator 7: Preschool Outcomes, and Indicator 12: Early Childhood Transition. For Part B, Indicator 17 is a new indicator requiring states to develop a SSIP for improving results for children with disabilities.

176. Special FY 2016 Research Competitions - Open for Applications

Source: Institute of Education Sciences - September 30, 2015

The Institute of Education Sciences is holding two special competitions for the FY 2016: Low-Cost, Short-Duration Evaluation of Education Interventions (CFDA Number 84.305L) and Special Education Interventions (CFDA Number 84.324L). See the program announcements below for more information, the Request for Applications, and application instructions.

The competitions were announced in the Federal Register on September 28, 2015.

177. World Family Map 2015: Mapping Family Change and Child Well-Being Outcomes

Source: Child Trends - September 24, 2015

The World Family Map report tracks 16 indicators that affect child and family well-being in 49 countries representing all regions of the world. The indicators were selected by an expert group because of their known relationships to child outcomes in the research literature. The 2015 edition of the report finds that marriage is becoming less common around the world, although in most countries more than half of children live with two parents. Malnutrition rates are decreasing, but many families in developing countries continue to experience undernourishment, poverty and unemployment. Learn more here. The report includes an essay looking at how parents divide labor-force participation, housework, and child care.

178. Child Care and Development Block Grant Participation in 2013

Source: CLASP - September 14, 2015

A new set of fact sheets provide information on children and families served using federal Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) funds, which help make quality child care affordable for low-income parents. Some of the findings show that in 2013 most of the families served were working, very low-income, and contributing to child care costs. Forty-three percent of the children were white, 42% were black, and 22% were Hispanic or Latino, regardless of race. Twenty-seven percent of children were under age 3, 39% were ages 3-5, and 34% were 6-13.

179. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC Journal of Early Intervention - June 2015

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/37/2

Facilitating Commenting and Requesting Skills in 3-Year-Old Children With Disabilities

Tina L. Stanton-Chapman and Tiara S. Brown

Do Portuguese Preschoolers With High Hyperactive Behaviors Make More Progress Than Those With Low Hyperactivity After Parental Interventionμ

Andreia Fernandes Azevedo, Maria Joáo Seabra-Santos, Maria Filomena Gaspar, and Tatiana Carvalho Homem

Families Living in Poverty: Perceptions of Family-Centered Practices

Melinda D. Swafford, Kim O. Wingate, Lisa Zagumny, and Dean Richey

Effects of an Animated Book Reading Intervention on Emergent Literacy Skill Development: An Early Pilot Study

Erin Schryer, Elizabeth Sloat, and Nicole Letourneau

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

180. Using Evidence-Based Practices for Learners with ASD - Five Free Online Modules

Source: AFIRM - September 4, 2015

Autism Focused Intervention Resources and Modules (AFIRM), an extension of the National Professional Development Center (NPDC) on Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), has released five free online modules focused on how practitioners can use evidence-based practices for learners with ASD. Each module includes case examples that demonstrate the practice in use, a multimedia presentation of content with audio and video clips, interactive assessments, and free professional development certificates. Currently, five modules are available and additional modules are on the way.

181. America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being

Source: Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics - September 4, 2015

America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2015 is the 17th in an ongoing series of reports published by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, which currently includes participants from 23 Federal agencies. The report presents 41 key indicators on important aspects of children's lives in America, including for example: Family Reading to Young Children, Child Care, Health Insurance Coverage, Preterm Birth and Low Birthweight, and Preschool Vision Screening. This year's report includes a special feature on Health Care Quality.

182. Child Care in State Economies

Source: Committee for Economic Development - September 4, 2015

A recent report from the Committee for Economic Development, Child Care in State Economies (2015), provides a broad overview of the child care industry in the U.S., how it impacts parents' ability to participate in the work force or pursue further education and training, and the role it plays as an integral part of state economies.

183. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC Journal of Early Intervention - September 2, 2015

Abstracts of the following forthcoming articles are available at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent. OnlineFirst provides access to articles before they are scheduled to appear in print.

Families Living in Poverty: Perceptions of Family-Centered Practices

Melinda D. Swafford, Kim O. Wingate, Lisa Zagumny, and Dean Richey

Facilitating Commenting and Requesting Skills in 3-Year-Old Children With Disabilities

Tina L. Stanton-Chapman and Tiara S. Brown

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

184. Research Briefs on Assessing Disruptive Behaviors and Implementing "Banking Time" in Preschools

Source: Center for Advanced Study of Teaching and Learning (CASTL) - August 28, 2015

Two new CASTL research briefs look at assessing disruptive behaviors in preschoolers and implementing a teacher-child intervention called Banking Time to address these behaviors.

185. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC Journal of Early Intervention - August 20, 2015

Abstracts of the following forthcoming articles are available at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent. OnlineFirst provides access to articles before they are scheduled to appear in print.

Effects of an Animated Book Reading Intervention on Emergent Literacy Skill Development: An Early Pilot Study

Erin Schryer, Elizabeth Sloat, and Nicole Letourneau

Do Portuguese Preschoolers With High Hyperactive Behaviors Make More Progress Than Those With Low Hyperactivity After Parental Intervention?

Andreia Fernandes Azevedo, Maria Joao Seabra-Santos, Maria Filomena Gaspar, and Tatiana Carvalho Homem

Additionally, abstracts of the following recently published articles (March 2015) are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/37/1?etoc

Including Social Opportunities During Small Group Instruction of Preschool Children With Social-Communication Delays

Justin D. Lane, David L. Gast, Collin Shepley, and Jennifer R. Ledford

Developing Feasible and Effective School-Based Interventions for Children With ASD: A Case Study of the Iterative Development Process

Jessica R. Dykstra Steinbrenner, Linda R. Watson, Brian A. Boyd, Kaitlyn P. Wilson, Elizabeth R. Crais, Grace T. Baranek, Michelle Flippin, and Sally Flagler

Effects of a Triadic Parent-Implemented Home-Based Communication Intervention for Toddlers

Jennifer A. Brown and Juliann J. Woods

Naturalistic Instructional Approaches in Early Learning: A Systematic Review

Patricia A. Snyder, Salih Rakap, Mary Louise Hemmeter, Tara W. McLaughlin, Susan Sandall, and Mary E. McLean

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

186. The Effects of Two Influential Early Childhood Interventions on Health and Healthy Behaviors

Source: National Bureau of Economic Research - August 20, 2015

A new report from the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) examines the long-term impacts on health and healthy behaviors of the Perry Preschool Project and the Carolina Abecedarian Project, two of the oldest and most widely cited early childhood intervention projects in the U.S. The report finds that both interventions have statistically significant effects on the healthy behavior and health of their participants, with treatment effects being particularly strong for males. The health outcomes affected vary by intervention. The Perry participants have significantly fewer behavioral risk factors (in particular smoking) by age 40 and the Abecedarian participants are in better physical health in their mid-30s. To learn more see the full report, The Effects of Two Influential Early Childhood Interventions on Health and Healthy Behaviors (August 2015).

187. Revised Head Start Program Performance Standards: Public Comment Period Extended

Source: Office of Head Start - August 12, 2015

The Office of Head Start recently announced a thirty-day extension for the public to comment on the Proposed Head Start Performance Standards from August 18, 2015 to September 17, 2015. The proposed rule is the first holistic revision of the Head Start Program Performance Standards since 1975. It sets an expectation that all Head Start programs serve preschoolers for a full school day and a full school year; raises standards to reflect current research on brain development, early learning, and effective practice; builds teacher skills and improves classroom performance through a system of evidence-based, individualized professional development; and reduces regulatory burden. Learn more about the revised standards and comment process online.

188. Is Early Retention an Effective, Research-Based Strategy for Improving Student Outcomes?

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) - August 7, 2015

Questions have been raised about the research to support state and local policies that require retention for young students. Educators, policymakers, and researchers find it difficult to reach consensus on this issue, particularly when young children are concerned. A new CEELO FastFast, Retention in the Early Years: Is Early Retention an Effective, Research-Based Strategy for Improving Student Outcomes? (August 2015), provides a review of the literature on the effects of early retention and discusses why retention is a nuanced rather than definitive research-based approach to enhancing outcomes.

189. Forthcoming Journal of Early Intervention Abstract Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention, Online First - July 29, 2015

An abstract of the following new forthcoming article is now available at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent. OnlineFirst provides access to articles before they are scheduled to appear in print.

Naturalistic Instructional Approaches in Early Learning: A Systematic Review (July 29, 2015)

Patricia A. Snyder, Salih Rakap, Mary Louise Hemmeter, Tara W. McLaughlin, Susan Sandall, and Mary E. McLean

190. Parent Checklist to Help Ensure that Children Thrive at School

Source: U.S. Department of Education - July 20, 2015

This new Parent Checklist includes key questions, tips, and resources that parents and caregivers can use to help ensure that their children are getting the education they deserve. It was developed by the U.S. Department of Education in collaboration with America Achieves, National Council of La Raza, National PTA, and the United Negro College Fund. A blog in English and Spanish provides more information.

The checklist follows the recent release of the Set of Rights from the Department outlining what families should be able to expect for their children's education - from access to quality preschool to an affordable, quality college degree.

191. International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - New Issue Available

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - July 20, 2015

The June 2015 issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is now available online. INT-JECSE is an open-access, peer reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. View the June 2015 Table of Contents with abstracts and links to the full-text articles.

192. Comment Request - Study on Sustaining the Positive Effects of Preschool

Source: U.S. Department of Education - July 10, 2015

A notice in today's Federal Register invites input from the public about the Study on Sustaining the Positive Effects of Preschool. This proposed information collection involves five case studies that will provide detailed descriptions of programs designed to help disadvantaged students in K-3 build on the positive effects of preschool or lead to positive cognitive, social-emotional, and academic outcomes by using policies, programs, and practices related to two key topic areas: (1) Preschool and K-3 alignment and (2) differentiated instruction. Comments must be received by August 10, 2015.

193. Early Childhood Data Privacy Resources

Source: Privacy Technical Assistance Center - June 16, 2015

States, communities, and local providers use and share data to support efficient, effective services for children and families participating in early childhood programs. However, data use must be balanced with the need to support privacy. The Privacy Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) has compiled a new set of Early Childhood Data Privacy resources, which focuses specifically on topics that early childhood programs may be asking about privacy.

194. Major Proposed Changes to Head Start Performance Standards - Open for Comment

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - June 19, 2015

On June 17, 2015, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) unveiled the first holistic revision of the Head Start Program Performance Standards since they were originally published in 1975. The Notice of Proposed Rule Making was published in the Federal Register on June 19, 2015 and is open for comment until August 18, 2015. The proposed rule sets an expectation that all Head Start programs serve preschoolers for a full school day and a full school year; raises standards to reflect current research on brain development, early learning, and effective practice; builds teacher skills and improves classroom performance through a system of evidence-based, individualized professional development; and reduces regulatory burden. View the news release and more information about the revised standards and comment process online.

195. Inequalities at the Starting Gate - Early Education Gaps by Social Class and Race

Source: Economic Policy Institute - June 17, 2015

A new report from the Economic Policy Institute explores the gaps that exist even before children enter kindergarten by social class and race/ethnicity in both cognitive skills (math, reading, and executive function) and noncognitive skills (self-control, approaches to learning, and interactions with teachers and peers). Findings indicate that social class is the single most influential factor on how ready children are to learn when they enter kindergarten. Race-based gaps decrease significantly when socioeconomic status is taken into account. See Early Education Gaps by Social Class and Race for a summary of the report's major findings and infographics on skill gaps in kindergarten. Download the full report, Inequalities at the Starting Gate Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills Gaps between 2010-2011 Kindergarten Classmates (June 2015), here.

196. Forthcoming Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention, Online First - June 12, 2015

Abstracts of the following forthcoming articles are now available at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent. OnlineFirst provides access to articles before they are scheduled to appear in print.

Including Social Opportunities During Small Group Instruction of Preschool Children With Social-Communication Delays

Justin D. Lane, David L. Gast, Collin Shepley, and Jennifer R. Ledford

Developing Feasible and Effective School-Based Interventions for Children With ASD: A Case Study of the Iterative Development Process

Jessica R. Dykstra Steinbrenner, Linda R. Watson, Brian A. Boyd, Kaitlyn P. Wilson, Elizabeth R. Crais, Grace T. Baranek, Michelle Flippin, and Sally Flagler

Effects of a Triadic Parent-Implemented Home-Based Communication Intervention for Toddlers

Jennifer A. Brown and Juliann J. Woods

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

197. Early Childhood State Advisory Councils - Final Report

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Early Childhood Development - June 2, 2015

The Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge and Preschool Development grants required states to maintain an active, fully functioning State Advisory Council (SAC) on Early Childhood Education and Care. On June 2, 2015, Early Childhood State Advisory Councils - Final Report was released. The report highlights significant accomplishments by the State Advisory Councils in eliminating existing barriers between early childhood programs and supporting stronger early childhood systems. Learn more about the Early Childhood State Advisory Councils here.

198. Trends and Innovations in Early Childhood Education Workforce Development

Source: BUILD Initiative - June 3, 2015

The BUILD Initiative has released Trends and Innovations in Early Childhood Education Workforce Development by Randi B. Wolfe, chapter four of the new E-book, Rising to the Challenge: Building Effective Systems for Young Children and Families (2015). This chapter reviews the workforce development efforts in seven states that received Early Learning Challenge grants. It highlights common trends, ongoing challenges, and promising practices - such as expanding the capacity of professional development systems; creating stronger career paths; and coaching supports and incentives to make professional development more accessible and affordable. Integrated throughout the chapter is an emphasis on addressing disparity (e.g., income, home language, race, culture) as it impacts early learning and development.

See a related BUILD blog post by Joan Lombardi. All of the chapters released to date are available on BUILD's Early Learning Challenge webpage. Additional chapters will be coming soon.

199. Reminder! Draft Policy Statement on Early Childhood Inclusion - Comment Request Closes Today

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - May 18, 2015

The U.S. Departments of Education Health and Human Services are proposing to release a policy statement on inclusion of young children with disabilities in high-quality inclusive early childhood programs. Comments are requested no later than 6:00pm EDT today - May 22, 2015. To review the draft policy statement and provide feedback go to http://www.ed.gov/edblogs/osers/2015/05/including-young-children-with-disabilities-in-high-quality-early-childhood-programs/. Scan to the bottom of the page (below the comments section) to provide your feedback. See a related news article here.

On Tuesday, May 26, 2015 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. ET, the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) will be hosting a webinar about the joint policy statement and the role of University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service (UCEDDs). Learn more here.

200. Grant Announcements for New Early Childhood Training and Technical Assistance System

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - May 19, 2015

On May 19, 2015, the Office of Head Start and the Office of Child Care posted the following six funding opportunity announcements on http://www.grants.gov/ soliciting proposals to build a new Early Childhood Training and Technical Assistance (T/TA) System. The first four are from the Office of Head Start and the last two are from the Office of Child Care.

To learn more, read this article and visit http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd/interagency-projects/ece-technical-assistance

201. Early Childhood Program Participation, From the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012

Source: American Institutes for Research and National Center for Education Statistics - May 2015

Early Childhood Program Participation, From the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012: First Look (May 2015) presents data on the early care and education arrangements and selected family activities of children in the United States from birth through the age of 5 who were not yet enrolled in kindergarten in the spring of 2012. The report also presents data on parents' satisfaction with various aspects of these care arrangements and on their participation in various learning activities with their children.

202. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC Journal of Early Intervention - December 2014

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/36/4

Introduction to Special Issue on the Center on Response to Intervention in Early Childhood: Developing Evidence-Based Tools for a Multi-Tier Approach to Preschool Language and Early Literacy Instruction

Ann P. Kaiser and Mary Louise Hemmeter

The Center for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood: Developing Evidence-Based Tools for a Multi-Tier Approach to Preschool Language and Early Literacy Instruction

Charles R. Greenwood, Judith J. Carta, Howard Goldstein, Ruth A. Kaminski, Scott R. McConnell, and Jane Atwater

Designing a Measurement Framework for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood Programs

Scott R. McConnell, Alisha K. Wackerle-Hollman, Tracy A. Roloff, and Michael Rodriguez

Identifying Preschool Children for Higher Tiers of Language and Early Literacy Instruction Within a Response to Intervention Framework

Judith J. Carta, Charles R. Greenwood, Jane Atwater, Scott R. McConnell, Howard Goldstein, and Ruth A. Kaminski

Building a Tier 2 Intervention: A Glimpse Behind the Data

Elizabeth S. Kelley and Howard Goldstein

Development of a Tier 3 Curriculum to Teach Early Literacy Skills

Ruth A. Kaminski, Kelly A. Powell-Smith, Annie Hommel, Rose McMahon, and Katherine Bravo Aguayo

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

203. Future of Children: Policies to Promote Child Health

Source: Princeton University and The Brookings Institution - May 7, 2015

The May 2015 issue of the Future of Children focuses on Policies to Promote Child Health. The issue reviews the strongest evidence to date on how best to promote child health and discusses what interventions and strategies work best at various stages of children's development. It includes articles specific to promoting child health in the early childhood years and the importance of family-centered programs and policies.

204. Promising Evidence that Early Head Start Can Prevent Child Maltreatment

Source: Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project - Retrieved May 7, 2015

A recently published brief highlights the results of a study of 1247 children and families who participated in the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project (EHSREP), funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Findings from the study suggest that Early Head Start may be effective in reducing child maltreatment among low-income children, in particular, physical and sexual abuse. To learn more see Research-to-Practice Brief: Promising Evidence that Early Head Start Can Prevent Child Maltreatment (March 2015).

205. New Funding Opportunity: Early Learning Research Network

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences - April 28, 2015

The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) has posted a Program Announcement requesting applications to form a Research Network on Supporting Early Learning from Preschool Through Early Elementary School Grades (Early Learning Network). There are three separate opportunities within the network: Early Learning Research Team, Early Learning Assessment Team, and Early Learning Network Lead. See the Request for Applications here.

206. Amended Regulations for Part B of the IDEA

Source: U.S. Department of Education - April 28, 2015

On April 28, 2015, the U.S. Department of Education published Amended Regulations for Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). These regulations govern the Assistance to States for the Education of Children with Disabilities program and the Preschool Grants for Children with Disabilities program. The amendments revise and clarify the regulations governing the requirement that local educational agencies maintain fiscal effort, known as "maintenance of effort."

207. InBrief: The Science of Resilience

Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University - April 29, 2015

A new two-page brief on The Science of Resilience (April 2015) discusses the development of resilience, an adaptive response to serious hardship, and explains why understanding resilience will help us design policies and programs that enable more children to reach their full potential. The brief provides an overview of Supportive Relationships and Active Skill-Building Strengthen the Foundations of Resilience (2015), a Working Paper by the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. See also, the related InBrief: Resilience Videos (2015).

208. InBrief Videos Series on Resilience

Source: Center for the Developing Child at Harvard University - Retrieved April 23, 2015

A better understanding of why some children do well despite early adversity is important for designing policies and programs that help more children reach their full potential. Supportive relationships, adaptive skill-building, and positive experiences constitute the foundation of what is commonly called resilience. A new InBrief Video Series on Resilience from the Center for the Developing Child at Harvard University provides an overview of why resilience matters, how it develops, and how to strengthen it in children. Each of the three videos in the series is just over 2 minutes long. These videos provide a brief overview of Supportive Relationships and Active Skill-Building Strengthen the Foundations of Resilience (2015), a working paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child.

209. Early Intervention Reunion Videos

Source: JFK Partners, University of Colorado School of Medicine - April 21, 2015

The ENRICH Early Intervention Reunion Videos is a new video series featuring families who received services from ENRICH, a transdisciplinary early intervention team that has been supporting the learning and development of infants and toddlers in Colorado since 1994. The "Reunion Videos" project re-connects the ENRICH team with families who received early intervention services as long as 20 years ago. In this video series, families will look back at archival photos and videos and discuss what early intervention services meant to them, which aspects of the services were most useful, and what has happened since. The first video in the series, A Reunion with Jennifer (Runtime: 14:08), is now available for viewing.

210. Child Health USA 2014 Now Online

Source: Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) - April 15, 2015

The MCHB has published its annual report on the health status and service needs of America's children. Child Health USA 2014 provides summaries of data on over 50 health-related indicators and addresses long-term trends. This year's report finds that the proportion of children aged 10-71 months receiving a standardized developmental screening increased from 19.5% in 2007 to 30.8% in 2011-2012. Additionally, among children 6 months-5 years of age, 73.2% were reported to usually or always exhibit 4 age-specific behaviors associated with flourishing (curiosity, resilience, attachment to caregivers, and positive affect). Only 47.7% of school-aged children were reported to usually or always exhibit 3 age-specific flourishing behaviors (curiosity, resilience, and self-regulation). The report allows users to define their own queries and view data by multiple sociodemographic and health-related characteristics.

211. Forthcoming Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention, Online First - April 16, 2015

Abstracts of the following forthcoming articles are now available at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent. OnlineFirst provides access to articles before they are scheduled to appear in print.

Development of a Tier 3 Curriculum to Teach Early Literacy Skills

Ruth A. Kaminski, Kelly A. Powell-Smith, Annie Hommel, Rose McMahon, and Katherine Bravo Aguayo

The Center for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood: Developing Evidence-Based Tools for a Multi-Tier Approach to Preschool Language and Early Literacy Instruction

Charles R. Greenwood, Judith J. Carta, Howard Goldstein, Ruth A. Kaminski, Scott R. McConnell, and Jane Atwater

Building a Tier 2 Intervention: A Glimpse Behind the Data

Elizabeth S. Kelley and Howard Goldstein

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

212. Grant Announcements for Education Research and Special Education Research

Source: Institute of Education Sciences (IES) - April 15, 2015

A notice announcing Applications for FY 2016 Awards - Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs was published in the Federal Register on April 15, 2015. The purpose of these grant programs is to expand fundamental knowledge and understanding of (1) developmental and school readiness outcomes for infants and toddlers with or at risk for disability, and (2) education outcomes for all students from early childhood education through postsecondary and adult education.

213. Forthcoming Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention, Online First - April 7, 2015

Abstracts of the following forthcoming articles are now available at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent. OnlineFirst provides access to articles before they are scheduled to appear in print.

Designing a Measurement Framework for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood Programs

Scott R. McConnell, Alisha K. Wackerle-Hollman, Tracy A. Roloff, and Michael Rodriguez

Identifying Preschool Children for Higher Tiers of Language and Early Literacy Instruction Within a Response to Intervention Framework

Judith J. Carta, Charles R. Greenwood, Jane Atwater, Scott R. McConnell, Howard Goldstein, and Ruth A. Kaminski

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

214. Updates and State Fact Sheets on the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

Source: Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau - April 8, 2015

Congress established the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) in 2010 to support voluntary, evidence-based home visiting services for at-risk pregnant women and parents with young children up to kindergarten entry. A new paper, The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Partnering with Parents to Help Children Succeed (2015) provides updated information on program participants, efforts to expand services to more families and communities, notable achievements, the Tribal Home Visiting Program, and research and evaluation. New Home Visiting State Fact Sheets (2015) have also been released, providing data on how the program is helping families in each State, including home visits made; parents, children and communities served; and evidence-based models used.

215. Reducing Health Insurance Inequities Among Underserved Children with Special Health Care Needs

Source: Catalyst Center - Retrieved March 31, 2015

The following two new briefs examine barriers to accessing health insurance coverage and health care financing for underserved and vulnerable families of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and discuss strategies to overcome those barriers:

These briefs were produced by the Catalyst Center and funded by the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

216. Child Care Assistance in 2013

Source: CLASP - March 30, 2015

Child care assistance helps to increase the sustainability of employment for low-income parents, provides stability for parents working to gain economic security, and allows low-income parents to access higher-quality care than they could otherwise afford. A new analysis of national and state spending on child care assistance finds that in FY 2013, the most recent year for which data are available, overall spending was at historically low levels. The number of children receiving child care assistance was also found to be at a 15-year low. See Child Care Assistance in 2013 for more information.

217. Selected Resources on Dual Language Learners in Pre-K through Third Grade

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes - April 2, 2015

A new annotated bibliography from the Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO), Resources for Supporting Teachers and Administrators to Improve Outcomes for Dual Language Learners in Pre-K through Third Grade (March 2015), identifies selected resources on best practices and policy to support effective teaching and learning for dual language learners (DLL) in early childhood programs and early elementary school.

218. Comment Request - Study on Sustaining the Positive Effects of Preschool

Source: U.S. Department of Education - March 30, 2015

A recent notice in the Federal Register invites input from the public about the Study on Sustaining the Positive Effects of Preschool. This proposed information collection involves five case studies of programs that are designed to sustain the positive effects of preschool. It will include interviews with district officials, principals, kindergarten teachers, preschool teachers, program funders, and program evaluators. Comments must be received by May 29, 2015.

219. Services for Families of Infants and Toddlers Experiencing Trauma

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - March 27, 2015

Research shows that there is a high rate of exposure to trauma among infants and toddlers, particularly children living in high-poverty communities. A new Research-to-Practice Brief, Services for Families of Infants and Toddlers Experiencing Trauma (2015), summarizes what is known about the impact of trauma on the development of infants and toddlers and discusses intervention strategies that could potentially protect them from the adverse consequences of traumatic experiences.

220. The Importance of the Transition to Kindergarten

Source: Harvard Family Research Project - March 25, 2015

The March 2015 Newsletter from Harvard's Family Involvement Network of Educators (FINE) discusses the evidence-base supporting the importance of the transition to kindergarten and profiles several programs in high-risk districts that are working to address existing inequalities. The newsletter includes a commentary on Four Important Things Research Tells Us About the Transition to School, including:

  • Transition is a matter of equity
  • A smooth transition to school makes a difference for children's outcomes
  • Families play an important role in the transition to school
  • Relationships among families, early childhood programs, schools, and communities are the foundation of effective transition practice

221. Early Learning Priority Included in New Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems Grant Competition

Source: Institute of Education Sciences - March 12, 2015

On March 12, 2015, a notice inviting applications for fiscal year (FY) 2015 Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems (SLDS) Grant Awards was published in the Federal Register. The purpose of the competition is to help states design, develop, and implement SLDSs that enhance their capacity to generate and use accurate and timely data to identify problems and drive improvement efforts at all levels of the education system. States may apply for funds to address up to two of six data use priorities, including an Early Learning priority. Applications are due June 10, 2015.

222. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention, 36(3) - September 2014

Abstracts of the following articles are available at: http://jei.sagepub.com/content/36/3

The Efficacy of a Home-School Intervention for Preschoolers With Challenging Behaviors: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Preschool First Step to Success.

Edward G. Feil, Andy Frey, Hill M. Walker, Jason W. Small, John R. Seeley, Annemieke Golly, and Steven R. Forness

Preliminary Development of the Parent Involvement in Early Learning Scale for Low-Income Families Enrolled in a Child-Development-Focused Home Visiting Program.

Patricia H. Manz, Amanda L. Gernhart, Catherine B. Bracaliello, Vanessa J. Pressimone, and Rachel A. Eisenberg

Using Rasch Rating Scale Methodology to Examine a Behavioral Screener for Preschoolers At Risk.

Christine DiStefano, Fred W. Greer, R. W. Kamphaus, and William H. Brown

Item-Based Psychometrics of the Preschool Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale.

Cynthia J. Cress, Matthew C. Lambert, and Michael H. Epstein

Measuring the Quality of Inclusive Practices: Findings From the Inclusive Classroom Profile Pilot.

Elena P. Soukakou, Pam J. Winton, Tracey A. West, John H. Sideris, and Lia M. Rucker

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families.

223. New Working Paper: Supportive Relationships and Active Skill-Building Strengthen the Foundations of Resilience

Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University - March 4, 2015

Decades of research provide substantial evidence that children who do well despite serious hardship have had at least one stable and committed relationship with a supportive parent, caregiver, or other adult. These relationships buffer children from adversity and help them build key capacities that enable them to adapt and thrive. Supportive relationships, adaptive skill-building, and positive experiences constitute the foundation of what is commonly called resilience. A new Working Paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Working Paper #13: Supportive Relationships and Active Skill-Building Strengthen the Foundations of Resilience (March 2013), identifies the key features of resilience and suggests ways to build it throughout the lifespan.

224. Two New WWC Quick Reviews of Recent Early Childhood Studies

Source: What Works Clearinghouse, Institute of Education Sciences - February 26, 2015

The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) recently conducted quick reviews of two studies that have received significant media attention.

Full-Day vs Part-Day Preschool Intervention Quick Review - This quick review looked at a study finding that children in a full-day preschool program scored higher than children in a part-day preschool program on four of the six school readiness indicators from the standardized Teaching Strategies GOLD Assessment System (language, math, social-emotional development, and physical health). The WWC quick review finds that the study does not meet WWC group design standards, because when the children were selected to participate in the full-day program, 4-year-olds were given priority over 3-year-olds, so the groups were not equivalent.

"Tools of the Mind" Quick Review - This quick review looked at a study finding that kindergarten students who were exposed to "Tools of the Mind" had improved math skills, response time on cognitive flexibility tasks, working memory, and cognitive processing speed at the end of kindergarten relative to the comparison students. The WWC quick review finds that some children in the sample were not effectively randomly assigned to the treatment or comparison groups. Therefore, the study cannot meet WWC standards without reservations. The study can meet WWC standards with reservations if the authors provide additional information to determine whether the intervention and comparison groups were similar at baseline.

225. New Video on Supporting Inclusion As Early As Possible

Source: Desired Results access Project - February 9, 2015

The Desired Results access Project recently published a new video on supporting inclusion beginning as early as possible. The video can be viewed online or downloaded at no cost for use in educational and professional development activities from the General Interest section of Desired Results' online Video Library.

  • Team Lydia Rose: Supporting Inclusion Every Day in Every Way (16:18) illustrates how inclusive practices should begin as early as possible and illustrates a range of topics including inclusion, collaboration and teamwork between general and special educators, family-centered early intervention in natural environments, coaching, embedded instruction, family leadership, and more. It has important messages for families who are, or will be, receiving early intervention services, for current and future early intervention practitioners, and for early childhood educators.

The Desired Results access Project, Napa County Office of Education, is funded by the California Department of Education, Special Education Division. Many thanks to Lydia Rose's family, the HOPE Infant Family Support Program, and the Child Development Center at Mira Costa College for their partnership in telling this story.

226. Early Learning Model Included in Final Requirements for School Improvement Grants

Source: U.S. Department of Education - February 9, 2015

On February 9, 2015, the U.S. Department of Education published Final Requirements for the School Improvement Grants (SIGs) , Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. Section I.A.2(f) allows an LEA to use SIG funds to implement an early learning intervention model in an elementary school. The final requirements also allow local educational agencies (LEAs) to implement additional interventions; provide flexibility for rural LEAs; and extend the grant period from three to five years. They are effective March 11, 2015. Some of the requirements for elementary schools implementing an early learning model include:

  • Offer full-day kindergarten;
  • Establish or expand a high-quality preschool program;
  • Provide educators, including preschool teachers, with time for joint planning across grades;
  • Use data to identify and implement an instructional program that is research-based, developmentally appropriate, and vertically aligned from one grade to the next as well as aligned with State early learning and development standards and State academic standards;
  • Promote the full range of academic content across domains of development, including math and science, language and literacy, socio-emotional skills, self-regulation, and executive functions;
  • Promote the continuous use of student data to inform and differentiate instruction;
  • Provide staff ongoing, high-quality, job-embedded professional development such as coaching and mentoring.

227. Four Pieces Address Expulsion and Suspension Practices in Early Learning Settings

Source: American Psychological Association - Retrieved February 4, 2015

Preschool expulsions occur at a significantly higher rate than that of grades K-12 and are greatly disproportionate to young boys of color. Part of President Obama's "My Brother's Keeper Initiative" encourages states, early childhood programs, and families to partner in preventing, reducing, and eventually eliminating the expulsion and suspension of young children from early learning programs. Recently, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Children and Families (ACF) worked with the American Psychological Association (APA) who highlighted this issue by hosting the following four pieces on Psychology Benefits Society, a blog from the APA Public Interest Directorate:

These pieces follow the release in December 2014 of the Policy Statement on Expulsion and Suspension Practices in Early Learning Settings by the U.S. Departments of Education (ED) and Health and Human Services (HHS).

228. New Report on Enhancing Young Hispanic Dual Language Learners' Achievement

Source: Educational Testing Service - January 20, 2015

A new policy report from the Educational Testing Service (ETS), Enhancing Young Hispanic Dual Language Learners' Achievement: Exploring Strategies and Addressing Challenges (January 2015) looks at key factors contributing to the academically at-risk status of young Hispanic dual language learners (DLLs) and describes the current research on strategies for supporting the learning and development of young DLLs in early education programs. The report also discusses the practical implementation challenges that need to be addressed to successfully incorporate promising strategies.

229. International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - New Issue Available

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - January 27, 2015

The December 2014 issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is now available online. INT-JECSE is an open-access, peer reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. Select "Language: English" in the upper right corner of the page. View the December 2014 Table of Contents with abstracts and links to the full-text articles. The English translations follow the Turkish text.

230. "Article of the Year" on Early Childhood Teacher Education Now Available Free Online

Source: Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education - January 21, 2015

The Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education recently made its "Article of the Year" for 2013 freely available online. Research on Early Childhood Teacher Education: Evidence from Three Domains and Recommendations for Moving Forward (March 2013), by Diane M. Horma, Marilou Hysonb, and Pamela J. Winton, examines the current research base in early childhood teacher education across three domains: addressing the needs of young children with disabilities and their families; understanding and working effectively with infants and toddlers; and, building young children's competence and interest in mathematics. The authors find that much of the current research that exists is descriptive and focused on small samples of children in a few innovative programs. They discuss the characteristics, key features, and significant gaps in the research, and identify the kinds of studies that are most needed to enhance the impact of early childhood teacher education. See also, the related 2-page FPG Snapshot, The Impact of Early Childhood Teacher Education: How to Answer the Unanswerable Question (February 2013), for a brief summary of the article.

231. Data Use for Continuous Quality Improvement: What the Head Start Field Can Learn from Other Disciplines

Source: Urban Institute - January 22, 2015

The Urban Institute has published a new report, Data Use for Continuous Quality Improvement: What the Head Start Field Can Learn from Other Disciplines - A Literature Review and Conceptual Framework (January 2015), which is meant to provide a starting place for examining data use for quality improvement in Head Start programs. The report summarizes research on the processes, facilitators, and impediments to data use for continuous quality improvement; develops a conceptual framework representing the elements of data use for continuous quality improvement; and provides linkages between the disciplines from which the literature was drawn and the Head Start field. It was sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), Administration for Children and Families. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

232. 2014 Survey Results from the IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association

Source: IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association - Retrieved January 15, 2015

The IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association (ITCA) recently posted the results of two 2014 surveys related to Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) online:

  • 2014 ITCA Tipping Points Survey - Part C Implementation: State Challenges and Responses - This survey is used to help track emerging issues and state responses related to eligibility, finance and decisions regarding continued participation in the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA). Forty‐eight of the fifty-six states and jurisdictions responded to the survey and forty‐seven (97.9%) completed the survey.
  • 2014 ITCA Finance Survey - This survey was designed to identify several key components of Part C financing, including: (1) federal, state and local funds being used by states to support their total Part C system; (2) the total amount of revenue that is generated by each fund source; (3) the total amount of revenue at federal, state and local levels; and (4) the percentage of each federal, state and local fund source contributing to the total cost of the system, with a close look at the percentage represented by Part C federal funds.

233. Comment Request - Evaluation of Preschool Special Education Practices Phase I

Source: U.S. Department of Education - December 30, 2014

On December 30, 2014, the U.S. Department of Education published a Request for Comments on the Evaluation of Preschool Special Education Practices Phase I . The main objective of the Evaluation of Preschool Special Education Practices, Phase I study is to assess the feasibility of conducting a large-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluation of one or more curricula or interventions that are used with preschool children with disabilities to promote their learning of language, literacy, social-emotional skills, and/or appropriate behavioral skills for school. Comments must be submitted on or before January 29, 2015.

234. Comment Request - Caring for Our Children Basics

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families - December 18, 2014

On December 18, 2014, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services's Administration for Children and Families (ACF) published Caring for Our Children Basics - Comment Request in the Federal Register. Caring for Our Children Basics is a voluntary set of minimum health and safety standards for early care and education settings. Because quality care cannot be achieved without consistent, basic health and safety practices in place, ACF is seeking to provide a helpful reference for states and other entities as they work to improve their health and safety standards across program type. This call for public comment is meant to help the ACF further develop the standards. Comments must be received by February 17, 2015.

235. Applications for New Awards: Stepping-up Technology Implementation

Source: U.S. Department of Education - November 21, 2014

On November 21, 2014, the U.S. Department of Education published the following notice in the Federal Register inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2015: Educational Technology, Media, and Materials for Individuals With Disabilities-Stepping-Up Technology Implementation. The Stepping-up Technology Implementation program is funded to help identify, develop, and disseminate products and resources that promote the effective implementation of evidence-based instructional and assistive technology tools in early childhood or kindergarten through grade 12 settings. The deadline for applications is January 20, 2015.

236. The Effects of an Early Literacy Text Messaging Program for Parents of Preschoolers

Source: National Bureau of Economic Research - November 10, 2014

A new paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), One Step at a Time: The Effects of an Early Literacy Text Messaging Program for Parents of Preschoolers (November 2014 - NBER Working Paper No. 20659), discusses an evaluation of READY4K!, a text messaging program designed to help parents of preschoolers support their children's literacy development. The program breaks down the complexity of parenting into small steps and provides continuous support throughout the school year. The authors found that READY4K! positively affected both parental engagement in home literacy activities with their children and parental involvement at school. These increases translated into children's learning gains in some areas of early literacy. The authors discuss text messaging as a promising approach to supporting parenting practices.

237. Five New Videos from Results Matter Available

Source: Results Matter - November 3, 2014

Results Matter, a program of the Colorado Department of Education, recently posted five new videos in their Results Matter Video Library. Four of the videos can be viewed and downloaded at no cost for use in professional and educational activities from the Practicing Observation, Documentation and Assessment Skills section of the library.

  • Praptee at the Breakfast Table (Runtime: 4:03) - Preschooler Praptee demonstrates a rich variety of self-help, communication, social, and manipulative skills at breakfast.
  • Praptee's Self-Portrait (Runtime: 6:57) - Preschooler Praptee demonstrates a rich variety of artistic, fine motor, communication, social, and literacy skills while producing a life-size self-portrait.
  • Cameron and Alexis Playing with Blocks (Runtime: 4:25) Cameron and Alexis demonstrate a rich variety of communication, social, problem-solving, motor, manipulative, imagination, and play skills in the block area.
  • The Puppet Stage (Runtime: 3:20) Jenniah, Cameron, and Evelynn demonstrate a rich variety of imaginative, communication, social, motor, manipulative, and play skills while playing with puppets.

A fifth video illustrates how a preschool teacher shares videos of children's development and learning with their parents at parent-teacher conferences. It can be viewed and downloaded from the Practices Here and There section of the library.

  • Engaging Families with Video at Parent-Teacher Conferences (Runtime: 7:48) - In this video, Anna La Torre, an ECE Teacher, illustrates how she shares video of children's development and learning with their parents at parent-teacher conferences. Anna and two parents describe the benefits of sharing video for teachers, families, and children.

238. Supporting Babies Through QRIS: A Self-Assessment Tool

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - October 27, 2014

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center recently released a new self-assessment tool to help states and jurisdictions identify strengths, opportunities, and gaps in a coordinated system of quality improvement for programs serving infants, toddlers, and their families. Supporting Babies Through QRIS: A Self-Assessment Tool for U.S. States and Other Jurisdictions (October 2014) is the latest in ZERO TO THREE's Supporting Babies Through QRIS series. The series presents a national review of QRISs that have been implemented statewide and provides examples of QRIS standards and supports for infants and toddlers that have been implemented across the nation.

239. Grant Notices - Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities

Source: U.S. Department of Education - October 22, 2014

On October 22, 2014, the U.S. Department of Education published the following grant notices in the Federal Register

The application packages for the 84.325D and 84.325K competitions are posted on the Department's Website at http://www2.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/grantapps/index.html and also on http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html

240. Culture Counts: Engaging Black and Latino Parents of Young Children in Family Support Programs

Source: Child Trends - October 16, 2014

Child Trends has published a new report focused on family support programs and strategies for reaching and engaging black and Latino families, with the ultimate goal of supporting young children's development. Culture Counts: Engaging Black and Latino Parents of Young Children in Family Support Programs (October 2014) presents a synthesis of available research on parent engagement and potential barriers to parent engagement in family support programs and provides recommendations for designing, adapting, and evaluating programs with culture in mind. It was funded by the Alliance for Early Success.

241. 2014 Diversity/Equity Learning Table: Materials Now Available Online

Source: BUILD Initiative and QRIS National Learning Network - October 17, 2014

From May to September 2014, six states participated in a BUILD Initiative and QRIS National Learning Network-supported Learning Table on the topic of assuring that state Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRISs) are responsive to children who are culturally, linguistically and socio-economically diverse. Materials from the 2014 Diversity/Equity Learning Table are now available online. They include PowerPoint presentations, curated topical resource lists, briefs, reports, articles, and state examples.

242. Comment Request - Evaluation of Preschool Special Education Practices Phase I

Source: Federal Register - October 8, 2014

On October 8, 2014, the Department of Education published the following invitation to comment in the Federal Register: Comment Request - Evaluation of Preschool Special Education Practices Phase I. The main objective of the Evaluation of Preschool Special Education Practices, Phase I study is to assess the feasibility of conducting a large-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluation of one or more curricula or interventions that are used with preschool children with disabilities to promote their learning of language, literacy, social-emotional skills, and/or appropriate behavioral skills for school. For complete information, go to http://www.regulations.gov and enter ED-2014-ICCD-0139 into the search box. Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before December 8, 2014.

243. Learnings from the Model Demonstration Projects on Early Childhood Language Interventions for Children with Developmental Disabilities and Delays

Source: Model Demonstration Coordination Center - December, 2013

The Model Demonstration Coordination Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education (OSEP) has published findings about the implementation experiences and outcomes, and model sustainment and spread, of 3 early childhood language intervention models:

The findings presented in these briefs were generated from data collected across the participating model demonstration projects. Please see the individual projects for information on their models and resources:

Model Demonstration Center for Promoting Language and Literacy Readiness in Early Childhood
Dale Walker, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
Kathryn Bigelow, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator
Jane Atwater, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator
Juniper Gardens Children's Project, University of Kansas
http://www.talk.ku.edu/

Center on Everyday Child Language Learning
Carl Dunst, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator
Carol Trivette, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator
The Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute
http://www.cecll.org

KIDTALK-TACTICS Project (KTTP)
Ann Kaiser, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator Vanderbilt University
http://kc.vanderbilt.edu/kidtalk
Juliann Woods, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator Florida State University
http://kttp.cci.fsu.edu

244. Start Early to Build a Healthy Future: The Research Linking Early Learning and Health

Source: Ounce of Prevention Fund - September 10, 2014

A new report from the Ounce of Prevention Fund, Start Early to Build a Healthy Future: The Research Linking Early Learning and Health (September 2014), summarizes new research on what children need to get a healthy start in life and discusses the positive effects of nurturing relationships, safe and secure environments, access to nutrition, health-promoting behaviors, and enriching early learning experiences. The authors provide policy and practice recommendations for supporting children's lifelong health through quality early care and education programs, as well as improved coordination and integration across agencies involved with young children and their families.

245. Invitations to Comment from the U.S. Department of Education

Source: U.S. Department of Education - September 8, 2014

The U.S. Department of Education recent published the following invitations to comment in the Federal Register:

246. Six by '15 Campaign Invites Contributions from the Field

Source: Association of University Centers on Disabilities - September 11, 2014

The Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) recently announced a new Six by '15 Campaign, which celebrates 25 years of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and 40 years of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The campaign has six overarching goals that its founding partners and endorsers hope to achieve by the end of 2015 to directly improve the lives of people with disabilities across the country. The early childhood goals of the campaign are:

  • At least six states increase by 15 percent the proportion of children ages 0-3 who receive recommended developmental screening.
  • At least six states commit to improving cross-system information exchange that supports access to services for children identified by screening.

The AUCD invites contributions to the content of the Sixby15 Campaign website with updates on efforts that are being made at the state and regional level toward these goals. Everyone is invited to contribute! Updates can be sent to Adriane Griffen at agriffen@aucd.org

247. New Fact Sheets on Head Start Programs in 2013

Source: CLASP - September 3, 2014

CLASP has released three new fact sheets on Head Start programs in 2013:

The fact sheets show that in 2013, the Head Start program served more than 1.1 million children and 15,400 pregnant women. Some additional findings include:

  • At the end of their Head Start enrollment, 97% of children had continuous access to medical care, 96% had health insurance, and 96% were up to date on their immunizations.
  • 63% of families using Head Start included at least one employed parent, and 15% of families had at least one parent in school or job training.
  • In the Head Start Preschool Program, 95% of teachers had at least an associate degree (A.A.) in early childhood education or a related field - a 2% increase from 2012. In addition, 67% of teachers had a bachelor's degree (B.A.) or higher in early childhood education or a related field - a 5% increase from 2012.
  • In the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start program, 98% of children had a medical home for ongoing medical care and 91% had a source for ongoing dental care by the end of the program year.

248. International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - New Issue Available

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - August 29, 2014

The June 2014 issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is now available online. INT-JECSE is an open-access, peer reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. Select "Language: English" in the upper right corner of the page. View the table of contents here.

249. Child Care and Development Block Grant Participation in 2012

Source: CLASP - August 26, 2014

The following new fact sheets from CLASP provide information on child care services funded by the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) in 2012: Child Care and Development Block Grant Participation in 2012 (August 2014) and Infants and toddlers in the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) program (August 2014). CCDBG is the primary source of federal funding for child care subsidies for low-income working families and to improve child care quality. The fact sheets show that there is great variability in child care assistance programs among states. Some highlights include:

  • The number of children receiving CCDBG-funded child care fell to its lowest levels since 1998. Several states reported decreases of up to 35% in numbers of children served between 2011 and 2012.
  • 28% of children served by CCDBG in 2012 were under age 3, 39% were ages 3 to 5, and 33% were ages 6 to 13.
  • 64% of infants and toddlers in CCDBG live in families with household incomes below the federal poverty level.
  • 65% of infants, 70% of toddlers, and 6% of school-aged children served through CCDBG are cared for in center-based settings.
  • 93% of families receiving CCDBG were working and/or in education or training programs.
  • 63% of CCDBG families paid co-payments for child care, with the mean co-payment amount being 7 percent of a family's income.

250. Comment Requests from the U.S. Department of Education on Part C of the IDEA

Source: U.S. Department of Education - August 26, 2014

On August 26, 2014, the U.S. Department of Education published the following extensions of existing comment requests in the Federal Register:

251. Preschool Development Grants - Applications Now Available

Source: U.S. Department of Education - August 18, 2014

On August 18, 2014, the U.S. Department of Education published the following two announcements in the Federal Register:

The goal of the Preschool Development Grants is to support states in developing and expanding voluntary, high-quality preschool programs in high-need communities for children from low- and moderate-income families. States with small state preschool programs can apply for development grants, while states with established, larger preschool programs can compete for expansion grants. The new grant program will be jointly administered by the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services. The deadline for submitting applications is October 14, 2014. Learn more here.

252. Meeting the Child Care Needs of Homeless Families: How Do States Stack Up?

Source: Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness - Retrieved August 22, 2014

Homeless parents need to have safe and stable child care arrangements in order to work and participate in job training, education, and other programs essential to resolving their homelessness. Federal and state subsidized child care should be a resource for these families; however, homeless families face many barriers to accessing child care and homeless mothers are actually less likely to receive child care subsidies than poor housed mothers. Meeting the Child Care Needs of Homeless Families: How Do States Stack Up? (July 2014), a new report from the Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness (ICPH), finds that the majority of states do not have policies in place to ease and encourage homeless families' use of child care subsidies.

253. New Video Illustrating Family Engagement

Source: Results Matter - August 18, 2014

Results Matter, a program of the Colorado Department of Education, recently posted the following new video in the Results Matter Video Library:

  • The Sunshine Bus Preschool on Wheels Program - Engaging Children and Families (Runtime: 9:23) - This video is a sequel to "Gus The Bus - Preschool on Wheels," illustrating how a host of community partners produced a second Preschool on Wheels to serve families who live in isolated areas. The focus of this story is on family engagement, described by a number of families who participate in the program.

This video can be accessed from the Practices Here and There section of the library. As with all Results Matter videos, it can be viewed online and downloaded at no cost for use in educational and professional development activities.

254. Treating Maternal Depression in Home Visiting - Opportunities for States

Source: Every Child Succeeds - Retrieved August 8, 2014

High rates of maternal depression have been found among new mothers served by home visiting programs; and for women living in poverty and women of color, depression often goes untreated. A new brief, Moving Beyond Depression: An Effective Program to Treat Maternal Depression in Home Visiting - Opportunities for States (July 2014), discusses the impacts of maternal depression on young children and families and provides research findings from Moving Beyond Depression, a comprehensive approach to identifying and treating depression among mothers voluntarily participating in home visiting programs. The brief was published by Every Child Succeeds, a division of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

255. New Child & Family Blog Brings Together Experts from Across the World

Source: The Future of Children - July 21, 2014

The Child & Family Blog is a new project that brings together experts from across the world who share and conduct research related to the well-being of children and family. The emphasis is on improving the lives of children based on cutting-edge research. Articles are translated in multiple languages and are intended to serve as an international resource for the media, policy makers, professionals who care for children, and families. The blog is sponsored by The Future of Children, a collaboration of Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Brookings Institution, as well as the University of Cambridge Applied Developmental Psychology Group in England, and the Jacobs Foundation in Switzerland.

256. Exploring Instability and Children's Well-Being

Source: Urban Institute - July 22, 2014

There is a growing awareness of the essential role of stability in children's healthy development and ability to learn - and of the negative consequences that instability can have. Instability can occur in a single domain of a child's life (change in school) or in multiple domains (loss in family income, food insecurity, divorce of parents, change in housing situation). A new paper from the Urban Institute, Exploring Instability and Children's Well-Being: Insights from a Dialogue among Practitioners, Policymakers and Researchers (July 2014), presents insights gleaned from a November 2013 meeting of policymakers, practitioners, and researchers about issues related to stability and instability in children's lives and identifies strategies to better support children's ability to learn and succeed. A companion report provides commentaries from some of the meeting participants.

257. New Briefs on Early Care and Education Quality Improvement

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - July 14, 2014

On July 14, 2014, the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released the following new briefs related to early care and education quality improvement:

258. Proposed Supplemental Priorities for Discretionary Grant Programs

Source: U.S. Department of Education - June 24, 2014

On June 24, 2014, the U.S. Department of Education published an invitation to comment on Proposed Supplemental Priorities and Definitions for Discretionary Grant Programs, which are meant to replace the 2010 Supplemental Priorities. Some of the 15 new and amended priorities are specific to early learning and development. They reflect lessons learned, as well as current policy objectives and emerging needs in education. Comments are being accepted until July 24, 2014

259. National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being - Wave 3 Tables

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - June 27, 2014

The National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) is a nationally representative, longitudinal survey of children who were the subjects of child maltreatment investigation. A newly published paper, NSCAW II Wave 3 Report: Wave 3 Tables provides descriptive information about the children 36 months after the maltreatment report that brought them into the study. Some of the tables include: "Participation in Child Care, Head Start, and Early Intervention Services Among Children 2 to 5 Years Old At Wave 3" and "Developmental Problems Among Children 2 to 5 Years Old at Wave 3." The report was published by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

260. Requests for Public Input from the U.S. Department of Education

Source: U.S. Department of Education - June 18 & 19, 2014

The U.S. Department of Education (Department) recently published the following requests for input from the public in the Federal Register:

261. Early Brain and Child Development Training Modules

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - June 6, 2014

The Early Brain and Child Development (EBCD) initiative, a program of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has produced five training modules for primary care health professionals. The modules focus on early brain development, toxic stress, adverse childhood experiences, supporting parents, cultivating community relationships, and advocacy. Each one takes about 45 minutes to complete, incorporates real time learning, and is designed to be fun and interactive. The modules are adaptable to a variety of needs and situations: groups and individual learners are both intended audiences.

262. Immigrant Parents and Early Childhood Programs

Source: Migration Policy Institute - June 12, 2014

The Migration Policy Institute (MPI) has released a new report, Immigrant Parents and Early Childhood Programs: Addressing Barriers of Literacy, Culture, and Systems Knowledge (June 2014). The report identifies the challenges immigrant and refugee families face as they try to engage in their young children's education, particularly those with low literacy or limited English proficiency, It also highlights strategies that can be used to address these challenges. It is based on field research in six states, expert interviews, a literature review, and a sociodemographic analysis.

263. How Early Learning Challenge States Can Meet the Needs of Infants and Toddlers

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - June 10, 2014

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center recently released Meeting the Challenge: How the Newest Early Learning Challenge Grantees Can Meet the Needs of Infants and Toddlers (May 2014), which explores six strategies the most recent Early Learning Challenge (ELC) grant recipients (Georgia, Kentucky, Michigan, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Vermont) are using that have the potential to improve outcomes for infants and toddlers. These strategies include: developing and integrating Early Learning Guidelines for infants and toddlers; professional development of the infant-toddler workforce; expansion of home visiting; building capacity in high-need communities; engaging and supporting families; and connecting families to appropriate services.

264. Infant, Toddler, and Early Childhood Mental Health Competencies: A Comparison of Systems

Source: ZERO TO THREE and the Erikson Institute - June 4, 2014

ZERO TO THREE and the Erikson Institute recently published a new report, Infant, Toddler, and Early Childhood Mental Health Competencies: A Comparison of Systems (2014) by Jon Korfmacher, which looks at how different state working groups have articulated the knowledge and skills needed by early childhood mental health providers, and how these competencies are being used. The report includes a comparison of early childhood mental health competency systems across six states - California, Colorado, Florida, Michigan, Ohio and Vermont.

265. Use of the CLASS-T in the Early Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation - June 5, 2014

A new technical brief from the Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation (OPRE) reports on the use of the Toddler Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS-T) in the Early Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (Baby FACES). The authors provide an overview of the Baby FACES study and a descriptive snapshot of quality in center-based settings based on observations in Early Head Start classrooms serving 2- and 3-year-old children. They then document evidence from Baby FACES of the instrument's psychometric properties, including results of factor analyses, internal consistency reliability, and concurrent and predictive associations to child development outcomes and other key indicators of quality. To learn more, see Observed Quality and Psychometric Properties of the CLASS-T in the Early Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (2014).

266. Why Rural Matters 2013-14

Source: The Rural School and Community Trust - May 19, 2014

A recently released report, Why Rural Matters 2013-14 (May 2014), highlights the condition of rural education in the 50 states. The report includes a section on Rural Early Child Development and presents census data describing the characteristics of the rural population ages birth to five in each of the 50 states (see Table 8). This is the seventh report in a series of biennial reports on rural education from the Rural School and Community Trust.

267. Access to High Quality Early Care and Education: Readiness and Opportunity Gaps in America

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes - May 19, 2014

The Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) recently published a new report, Access to High Quality Early Care and Education: Readiness and Opportunity Gaps in America (May 2014), which finds that access to quality early care and education is highly unequal for children in the U.S. and is of particular concern for African American, Hispanic, and non-English-speaking children. This is due in part to the fact that targeted programs are often not high quality and targeting is not always effective in reaching disadvantaged populations. The information presented is based on analyses of three main sources of data: the State of the Preschool Yearbook series, the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort 2010/11 (ECLS-K), and the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort 2001 (ECLS-B). See also, a related blog post from the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER).

268. The Role of Program Quality in Determining Head Start's Impact on Child Development

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - May 19, 2014

A recent report, The Role of Program Quality in Determining Head Start's Impact on Child Development: Third Grade Follow-Up to the Head Start Impact Study (2014), examines the influence of Head Start quality on selected developmental cognitive and social-emotional outcomes. Using data from the Head Start Impact Study (HSIS), the report looks at whether the impacts of Head Start might be larger or more persistent for children who participate in high quality Head Start programs as opposed to lower quality Head Start programs. The report was published online by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) on May 19, 2014.

269. Comment Request - Case Studies of the Implementation of Kindergarten Entry Assessments

Source: U.S. Department of Education - May 15, 2014

On May 15, 2014, the U.S. Department of Education published a request for comments in the Federal Register on a proposed new information collection, Case Studies of the Implementation of Kindergarten Entry Assessments. The purpose of the Kindergarten Entry Assessments (KEAs) implementation case studies will be to document the processes, accomplishments, challenges, and solutions of four states implementing KEAs, and to share what state, district, and school personnel have learned with federal and state policymakers, and practitioners in the field. These findings will support the technical assistance efforts of the U.S. Department of Education regarding the implementation of KEAs across the nation. Comments can be submitted on or before July 14, 2014.

270. State of Preschool 2013: First Look

Source: Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics - May 8, 2014

A new report, State of Preschool 2013: First Look (May 2014) presents data about state supported preschool enrollment and the funding of preschool programs at the state and national levels for the 2012-13 school year. The information provided is based on data collected through the State of Preschool 2012-13 data collection from the National Center for Education Statistics within the Institute of Education Sciences. Some highlights include:

  • Forty states and the District of Columbia had state supported programs in place in 2012-13.
  • State-funded preschool served 1.34 million children in these states.
  • Total expenditures from all identified sources supporting state preschool programs equaled $6.2 billion, representing a decrease from the previous year's inflation-adjusted total of $6.39 billion.

271. Home Visiting Programs: Reviewing Evidence of Effectiveness

Source: Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness Project - Retrieved April 24, 2014

The Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) Project was created to identify home visiting models that meet the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' criteria for an evidence-based early childhood home visiting service delivery model. It is meant to assist states participating in Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program, which requires that 75 percent of grant funding be spent on program models that are proven to be effective. A new brief, Home Visiting Programs: Reviewing Evidence of Effectiveness - OPRE Report #2014-13 (March 2014), provides a three-page summary describing the review process, review results, and the 14 program models that have been identified to date.

272. Formative Assessment: Guidance for Early Childhood Policymakers

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes - April 16, 2014

The Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) has published a new report, Formative Assessment: Guidance for Early Childhood Policymakers (April 2014), by Shannon Riley-Ayers. The report is meant to serve as a guide and framework for early childhood policymakers considering formative assessment. It defines formative assessment and outlines its process and application in the context of early childhood. It also provides several essential questions for policy makers to consider in the process of selecting, supporting, and using data to inform and improve instruction. A related Preschool Matters blog post from the author briefly outlines these questions for policy-makers, as well as considerations for teachers and researchers.

273. Trends in the Use of Early Care and Education, 1995-2011

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation - April 7, 2014

In recent decades, there has been a large increase in young children's participation in early care and education (ECE) programs. A new report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) uses multiple years of data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) and the National Household Education Survey (NHES) to examine trends in ECE arrangements for young children from 1995-2011. Trends in the Use of Early Care and Education, 1995-2011: Descriptive Analysis of Child Care Arrangements from National Survey Data (March, 2014) specifically addresses these two questions:

  1. What types of non-parental early care and education (ECE) arrangements were children enrolled in between 1995 and 2011, and how did enrollment patterns change over that period?
  2. How do rates of participation in ECE and trends in the use of various ECE arrangements differ based on demographic characteristics?

274. Two New Roadmaps to Effective Intervention Practices

Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - April 8, 2014

The Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI) has published two new additions to its Roadmap to Effective Intervention Practices series.

  • Roadmap #6: Statewide Implementation of the Pyramid Model (March 2014) by Glen Dunlap, Barbara J. Smith, Lise Fox, and Karen Blas - Provides important guidance on the implementation of the Pyramid Model, structures for implementation, and the activities needed at each stage of implementation and scaling-up.
  • Roadmap #7: Data Decision-Making and Program-Wide Implementation of the Pyramid Model (March 2014) by Lise Fox, Myrna Veguilla, and Denise Perez Binder - Provides guidance on how to collect and use data to ensure the implementation of the Pyramid Model with fidelity and decision-making that improves the provision of implementation supports, delivery of effective intervention, and the promotion of meaningful child outcomes.

Learn about the Pyramid Model for Supporting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children here.

275. Applications for New Awards - Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences - April 10, 2014

On April 10, 2014, the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences (IES) published a notice in the Federal Register announcing its FY 2015 competitions for grants to support education research and special education research. The IES's National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) will hold two competitions: one competition for special education research and one competition for special education research training. To learn more, see Applications for New Awards - Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs

276. New Tool Provides State-by-State Data on Child Wellbeing by Race and Ethnicity

Source: Institute for Child, Youth and Family Policy - March 12, 2014

On March 12, 2014, the Institute for Child, Youth and Family Policy (ICYFP) at Brandeis University launched an interactive online tool, diversitydatakids.org, which provides state-by-state data on child wellbeing and equity in the U.S. by race and ethnicity. The site allows users to create customized profiles, rankings, and maps. It also features a neighborhood-level child opportunity index, developed in partnership with the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University. The launch of diversitydatakids.org was accompanied by the release of two fact sheets showing how data can contribute to a more robust narrative around diversity and racial equity for children. The site will continue to release fact sheets and other content, providing examples of how data can be used by site visitors at any level of expertise.

277. Major New Findings from the Abecedarian Project Show Health Benefits 30 Years Later

Source: Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute - March 27, 2014

The Frank Porter Graham (FPG) Child Development Institute recently reported that children who received high-quality early care and education in the Abecedarian Project from birth until age 5 enjoyed better physical health in their mid-30s than peers who did not attend the childcare-based program. Significant measures also indicate that better health lies ahead for these individuals. The findings appear in the March 28, 2014 issue of Science and are the result of FPG's collaboration with Nobel laureate James J. Heckman.

278. Scrambling for Stability: The Challenges of Job Schedule Volatility and Child Care

Source: CLASP - March 27, 2014

On March 27, 2014, CLASP released a new brief, Scrambling for Stability: The Challenges of Job Schedule Volatility and Child Care (March 2014), which examines the difficulties many low-income parents face as they try to deal with unpredictable job schedules and child care simultaneously. A growing number of workers have minimal control over their hours and these workers are disproportionately earning lower wages. At the same time, child care providers find it difficult to accommodate parents with volatile schedules. As a result, parents are left to piece together a patchwork of care arrangements, resulting in instability for their children. The new brief provides a list of potential action steps, highlights important existing research, and identifies the need for more research and data collection.

279. Fact Sheets on Supporting Immigrant Families' Access to Prekindergarten

Source: Urban Institute - March 19, 2014

Children of immigrants can benefit from attending prekindergarten, though they enroll less, on average, than children with US-born parents. The Urban Institute recently published the following three fact sheets on supporting immigrant families' access to prekindergarten:

See also, the full report: Supporting Immigrant Families' Access to Prekindergarten (March 19, 2014)

280. Head Start by the Numbers: 2012 PIR Profiles

Source: CLASP - March 19, 2014

On March 19, 2014, CLASP announced the release of its 2012 Head Start State Profiles (March 2014) and a new interactive map providing state-by-state data on all Head Start programs in the state: Early Head Start, Head Start preschool, and Migrant/Seasonal Head Start. The profiles include information on Head Start participants, families, staff, and programs. They are based on the 2012 Program Information Report (PIR) data, which all Head Start programs are required to complete on an annual basis

281. Report on Two-Generation Approaches to Supporting Children and Parents Together

Source: Ascend at the Aspen Institute - Retrieved March 14, 2014

Ascend at the Aspen Institute recently released a new report entitled Gateways to Two Generations: The Potential for Early Childhood Programs and Partnerships to Support Children and Parents Together (2014). The report looks at how leading early childhood programs are supporting families' educational success and economic security by providing more than just care and education for children. It documents the evolution of early childhood efforts and support for parents and emphasizes the importance of partnerships for two-generation approaches that support both children and their parents together.

282. Child Care Assistance Spending and Participation in 2012: A Record Low

Source: CLASP - Retrieved March 10, 2014

Child care subsidies are meant to help make quality child care affordable for low-income parents, allowing them to attend work or school while ensuring their children's healthy development. Access to quality child care has also been shown to strengthen families' economic security. A new analysis from CLASP finds that state spending on child care assistance, including funds from the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) and the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, was at a 10-year low in 2012 and the number of children receiving CCDBG-funded assistance was at a 14-year low. Since 2006, the number of children receiving CCDBG-funded child care has fallen by approximately 263,000 children. The analysis is based on the most recent state data available from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. To learn more, see Child Care Assistance Spending and Participation in 2012: A Record Low (February 2014) by Hannah Matthews and Stephanie Schmit.

283. A Fifteen- Year (1997- 2012) Profile Of Children's Overall Health

Source: Child Trends - Retrieved March 14, 2014

Child Trends has published a new research brief, A Fifteen- Year (1997- 2012) Profile Of Children's Overall Health: National and State Estimates, by Family Income Level (March 2014), which tracks trends in health status for children between 1997 and 2012. Findings show that the majority of U.S. children are in very good or excellent health, according to parental report. However, children in non-low-income families are more likely to be healthy by this measure than are their low-income peers. This infographic provides some highlights. Between 1997 and 2011/12, the proportion of low-income children in excellent or very good health rose three percentage points. Among more affluent children, the proportion rose by 1.5 points.

284. Promoting Health Equity Through Full-Day Kindergarten Programs

Source: Community Preventive Services Task Force - Retrieved March 14, 2014

The Community Preventive Services Task Force was established in 1996 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to identify population health interventions that are scientifically proven to save lives, increase lifespans, and improve quality of life. The Task Force recently published the following articles in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (March 2014) related to promoting health equity for low-income and minority children through full-day kindergarten programs.

To learn more, go to http://www.thecommunityguide.org/healthequity/education/fulldaykindergarten.html.

285. Lessons for the Nation from One State's Experience with Full-Day Kindergarten

Source: New America Foundation - Retrieved March 12, 2014

The New America Foundation recently released a new report, Raising Arizona: Lessons for the Nation from a State's Experience with Full-Day Kindergarten (February 2014). The report describes the kindergarten landscape across the country and research supporting full-day kindergarten. It also examines Arizona's experiences implementing full-day kindergarten and offers lessons learned for policymakers across the country who are considering whether, and how, to expand the provision of and funding for full-day kindergarten.

286. Invitation to Comment - State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education - February 12, 2014

On February 12, 2014, the U.S. Department of Education posted an Invitation to Comment on the State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015. This annual survey centralizes data about publicly provided early childhood education opportunities. Data are collected from state agencies responsible for providing early childhood education and made available for secondary analyses. Public comments are due on or before April 14, 2014.

287. Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Source: American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - February 5, 2014

The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry published new guidance for diagnosing and treating infants, toddlers, children, and adolescents (0 to 18 years of age) with autism in the February 2014 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (p. 237-257). Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder presents recommendations that include: multidisciplinary care; coordination of services; early, sustained intervention; the use of multiple treatment modalities; helping families with long-term planning; and finding support for parents and siblings. It updates an earlier guidance document published in 1999 and incorporates new research findings.

288. Input Sought on New Competition to Support High-Quality Preschool Programs

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - February 6, 2014

The U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services are seeking input on a new competition to build, develop and expand high-quality preschool programs across States and communities. The two departments encourage all interested parties to read about the new competition and submit opinions, ideas, suggestions and comments at the Homeroom Blog up until 5:00 p.m. EDT on February 26, 2014.

289. INQUIRE Data Toolkit Available Online

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - January 30, 2014

Collecting high-quality data can assist states in their efforts to continuously improve their early care and education systems, and analyzing data collected uniformly across states can build the evidence base needed for understanding which initiatives and quality improvement models are effective and in which contexts. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) recently published the INQUIRE Data Toolkit (OPRE Report #2013-58), which was designed to support states' efforts to effectively gather and use high-quality data. The Quality Initiatives Research and Evaluation Consortium (INQUIRE), which is funded by OPRE through a contract with Child Trends, contributed to the development of the toolkit.

290. The State of America's Children 2014

Source: Children's Defense Fund - January 23, 2014

The Children's Defense Fund has published a new edition of its annual report on the well-being of children. The State of America's Children 2014 provides data on child population, poverty, family structure and income, housing, child nutrition, early childhood, education, and more. It finds that for the first time, the majority of children in America under the age of two are now children of color and children of color are disproportionately poor. Over 1 in 4 children under age 5 are poor and over 1 in 3 children of color under age 5 are poor.

291. A Family Guide to Participating in the Child Outcomes Measurement Process

Source: National Parent Technical Assistance Center and Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center - January 15, 2014

The National Parent Technical Assistance Center, in collaboration with the Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, recently published A Family Guide to Participating in the Child Outcomes Measurement Process, which informs parents about the three child outcomes that are measured for every child in the U.S. who participates in an early intervention or early childhood special education program. It includes tips on how families can be fully involved in the child outcomes measurement process and provides information on how families can use the outcomes to better understand their child's development.

292. Updated Autism Intervention Literature Review

Source: FPG Child Development Institute, National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders - January 8, 2014

The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders (NPCD-ASD) at the FPG Child Development Institute recently published a new report, Evidence-Based Practices for Children, Youth, and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (2014). In 2010, NPDC conducted a review of the literature (from 1997-2007) on autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and identified 24 evidence-based practices (EBPs). The center has just updated the review, screening approximately 29,000 articles about ASD to identify the soundest research on interventions for children from birth to age 22. The new report identifies 27 focused intervention practices that provide a solid, empirical basis on which to design programs for children and youth with ASD.

293. Supporting Children Through Community-Based Coalitions

Source: Early Learning Challenge Technical Assistance Program - January 17, 2014

The development of an early childhood system, both in states and communities, requires coordination among people and programs from many disciplines and organizations. The Early Learning Challenge Technical Assistance (ELC TA) Program recently published a guide, Supporting Children Through Community-Based Coalitions (December 2013), to support newly forming community coalitions in their work. The guide explores: (1) why coalitions are important to impacting change; (2) what coalitions need to be successful; (3) how to get started; and (4) what an action plan should include. It provides examples of nine community coalitions from around the country and additional resources for communities beginning the work.

294. Part C 2013 Tipping Points Survey Results

Source: IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association - Retrieved January 10, 2014

The IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association (ITCA) has published the results of its 2013 Tipping Points Survey - Part C Implementation: State Challenges and Responses online. The survey is used to help track emerging issues and state responses related to eligibility, finance and decisions regarding continued participation in the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA). Forty-nine of the fifty-six states and jurisdictions responded to the survey and forty-three completed the survey. ITCA draws no conclusions from the data analysis but simply reports the data. All information is aggregated and the individual state responses are confidential.

295. December 2013 Issue of International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - January 4, 2014

The December 2013 issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is now available online. INT-JECSE is an open-access, peer reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. Select "Language: English" in the upper right corner of the page.

296. Applications for New Awards from the U.S. Department of Education

Source: U.S. Department of Education - January 10, 2014

The U.S. Department of Education recently published the following applications for new awards in the Federal Register:

297. Proposed Rule: Provision of Early Intervention and Special Education Services to Eligible DoD Dependents

Source: Department of Defense - December 13, 2013

On December 13, 2013, the Department of Defense (DoD) published a proposed rule in the Federal Register on the Provision of Early Intervention and Special Education Services to Eligible DoD Dependents. The proposed rule would revise the current regulations in 32 CFR part 57 to incorporate the 2004 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and would establish other policy and assign responsibilities to implement the non-funding and non-reporting provisions of Parts B and C of the IDEA. The IDEA regulations in 34 CFR parts 300 and 303, which apply to States that receive funds from the U.S. Department of Education under IDEA Parts B and C, do not apply to the DoD school systems as DoD does not receive funds under the IDEA. Nothing in the proposed regulations would affect the applicability of the U.S. Department of Education's regulations implementing IDEA in 34 CFR parts 300 and 303. Comments must be received by February 11, 2014.

298. Key Components of Collaboration in the Early Childhood Field

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - December 12, 2013

In recent years, there has been an increasing emphasis on coordination and collaboration across early care and education sectors to provide consistent, high-quality services for families with young children. A new research brief, Conceptualizing and Measuring Collaboration in the Context of Early Childhood Care and Education (OPRE Research Brief 2013-29, November 2013), identifies key components of collaboration and encourages the development and use of measures of collaboration in the early childhood field. The authors also provide recommendations for future research. The paper was prepared under the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation's (OPRE's) Child Care and Early Education Policy and Research Analysis and Technical Expertise Project with Child Trends.

299. National Scan of State Policies Shows Increasing Emphasis on Early Education in 2013

Source: Education Commission of the States - December 2, 2013

The Education Commission of the States (ECS) has published a new report, 2013 Legislative Session - P-3 Policies (November 2013), by Emily Workman, which looks at the work states across the country are doing to strengthen their early childhood systems. Using the results of a national scan of enacted policies from the 2013 legislative sessions, the report finds that state policymakers are increasingly recognizing the benefits of early learning and developmental services for young children. It highlights ways in which they are strengthening their early childhood systems in areas such as governance, funding, program access, family engagement, teacher preparation/certification, assessment, Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS), Home Visiting and more.

300. Pushing Toward Breakthroughs: Using Innovative Practice to Address Toxic Stress

Source: Center for Developing Child at Harvard University - December 4, 2013

The Center for Developing Child at Harvard University has published a new article, Pushing Toward Breakthroughs: Using Innovative Practice to Address Toxic Stress (December 2013), in its multi-part series entitled, Tackling Toxic Stress. This final installment describes how a small but growing group of forward-thinking social service practitioners are using the expanding scientific evidence about the long-term, damaging effects of toxic stress to try innovative approaches that target its root causes and could lead to breakthroughs in the effectiveness of interventions - for both children and their caregivers.

301. Early Childhood Development: the Promise, the Problem, and the Path Forward

Source: Brookings Institute - November 25, 2013

The Brookings Institute recently published a paper, Early Childhood Development: the Promise, the Problem, and the Path Forward (November 2013), by Tamar Atinc and Emily Gustafsson-Wright. The authors discuss the gains to be had from investing in early childhood development programs toward improved health and education for millions of children under five around the world.

302. New Series of Briefs on Supporting Babies Through QRIS

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - November 21, 2013

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center has released the first two documents of a new series, Supporting Babies Through QRIS. The series is meant to help ensure that Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) are supporting the unique developmental needs of infants and toddlers. The documents present a national review of states' and jurisdictions' QRIS that have been implemented statewide and illustrates some examples of QRIS standards and supports that have been included across the nation to help programs promote young children's development and learning.

303. The Importance of Family Engagement in Infant and Toddler Programs

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - November 20, 2013

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) recently released a new paper, Promote Family Engagement (2013), which discusses the importance of family engagement in child care and early education programs serving infants and toddlers. The paper provides research documenting the importance of strengthening family engagement, policy recommendations states can consider to enhance family engagement strategies, and other resources. It was published as part of CLASP'S Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project, an effort to link research to policy ideas to help states make the best decisions for infants and toddlers in child care.

304. Supplement Provides Information about Home Visiting Programs and Early Childhood

Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved November 22, 2013

A supplement to the November 2013 issue of Pediatrics is dedicated to the topic of home visiting and early childhood. Articles address topics such as the effectiveness of home visiting in improving child health and reducing child maltreatment, improving nurse-family partnerships, maternal depression, home visiting in partnership with pediatric care, a cell phone-enhanced home visiting parenting intervention, integrating home visiting into medical care of infants born to young mothers, and enhancing home visiting with mental health consultation. The supplement was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics and sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Administration for Children and Families.

305. Bipartisan Proposal to Expand Access to High-Quality Early Education Programs

Source: U.S. Department of Education - November 13, 2013

On November 13, 2013 Sen. Harkin (D-IA), Rep. Miller (D-CA), and Rep. Hanna (R-NY) unveiled a bipartisan proposal that would expand high-quality, early-childhood education for children from birth to age five. Watch a 5:26 minute video of the announcement. The proposal focuses on four key areas:

  1. Establishing federal-state partnerships to provide high-quality preschool to low and moderate income families;
  2. Increasing the quality of infant and toddler care in center-based and family child care settings;
  3. Supporting quality improvements in the Child Care and Development Block Grant; and
  4. Encouraging continued support for the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting program.

Read a summary of the Strong Start for America's Children Act of 2013 here. See also, the House Bill and the Senate Bill.

306. Fact Sheet on Early Care and Education Participation, Access, and Quality

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy and National Center for Children in Poverty - November 15, 2013

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) and the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) have released a joint publication, Investing in Young Children: A Fact Sheet on Early Care and Education Participation, Access, and Quality (November 2013). The fact sheet provides information about the percentages of young children in each state experiencing risks related to poor educational outcomes, as well as trends in federal and state investments in early care and education programs and state policies related to both access and quality. The fact sheet also includes links to NCCP and CLASP resources and tools, including state specific information.

307. "What Works" Practice Guide: Teaching Math to Young Children

Source: What Works Clearinghouse, Institute of Education Sciences - November 13, 2013

The Institute of Education Sciences' What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) recently released a practice guide, Teaching Math to Young Children (November 2013). The guide provides five recommendations for teaching math to children in preschool, prekindergarten, and kindergarten. Each recommendation includes implementation steps and solutions for common roadblocks. The recommendations also summarize and rate supporting evidence. The guide is geared toward teachers, administrators, and other educators who want to build a strong foundation for later math learning.

308. Report on Supporting Early Healthy Development

Source: Center for the Study of Social Policy - November 15, 2013

On November 12, 2013, the Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) published a new report, Results-Based Public Policy Strategies for Supporting Early Healthy Development (November 2013). The report discusses a number of basic developmental needs that are important to ensure the healthy development of young children. Some of these include: the constant care and support of the adults in children's lives; high-quality nutrition, medical and dental care; ongoing opportunities to learn and socialize; a secure emotional attachment to a caregiver; and safety and stability in their homes, schools and communities. The report provides recommendations and detailed strategies in four primary policy areas: (1) provide health coverage and access; (2) support early social, emotional, and behavioral health; (3) ensure school readiness by age 5; and (4) support parents to ensure children thrive.

309. Updated Head Start Preschool and Early Head Start Fact Sheets

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - November 13, 2013

Using data from the Head Start Program Information Report (PIR) for 2011-2012, the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) has released updated fact sheets summarizing the characteristics of Head Start preschool and Early Head programs in 2012 and the children and families served.

310. A Portrait of Infants and Toddlers in the United States

Source: Child Trends and the McCormick Foundation - November 5, 2013

Child Trends and the McCormick Foundation have published a new report, The Youngest Americans: A Statistical Portrait of Infants and Toddlers in the United States (November 2013). The report provides a comprehensive indicators-based portrait of the ~12 million infants and toddlers in America. It includes basic demographical data on these young children, including information about their health and well-being, and the well-being of their parents. The authors present observations about the composite portrait drawn and identify some common threads in the data. Some key findings show that:

  • Many infants and toddlers in America today are starting out with severe economic hardship.
  • There are considerable inequities marked by income and race/ethnicity and these inequities are often compounded by fragile family situations.
  • The majority of mothers of infants and toddlers are working.
  • Parental leave, high-quality child care, and access to early intervention services are out of reach for many families raising infants and toddlers.

311. New Research Brief Reviews the Evidence Base on Preschool Education

Source: Foundation for Child Development and Society for Research in Child Development - October 16, 2013

A new research brief, written by an interdisciplinary team of early childhood experts, provides a non-partisan, thorough review of the current evidence on why early skills matter, which children benefit the most from preschool, the short- and long-term effects of preschool on children's school readiness and life outcomes, the importance of program quality, and the costs versus benefits of preschool education. The brief was funded by the Foundation for Child Development and produced in collaboration with the Society for Research in Child Development. To learn more see, Investing in Our Future: The Evidence Base on Preschool Education (October 2013), by Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Christina Weiland, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Margaret R. Burchinal, Linda M. Espinosa, William T. Gormley, Jens Ludwig, Katherine A. Magnuson, Deborah Phillips, Martha J. Zaslow. An executive summary is also available.

A panel discussion about the brief hosted by the New America Foundation, Too Much Evidence to Ignore: New Findings on the Impact of Quality Preschool at Scale (October 16, 2013), was recorded and is available for viewing online.

312. New Future of Children Journal Focuses on Military Children and Families

Source: Princeton-Brookings - October 1, 2013

The Fall 2013 issue of the Princeton-Brookings The Future of Children journal (Volume 23, Number 2) summarizes existing research on the risks and the resiliency of Military Children and Families. It also discusses new knowledge that is needed to better support the health and development of military children and includes articles on Military Children from Birth to Five Years, by Joy D. Osofsky and Lt. Colonel Molinda Chartrand, as well as Child Care and Other Support Programs, by Major Latosha Floyd and Deborah A. Phillips. The military's child care system serves approximately 200,000 children a day and is widely considered to be a model for the nation. According to a related policy brief, Keeping the Promise: Maintaining the Health of Military and Veteran Families and Children (Fall 2013) by Colonel Stephen J. Cozza, Ron Haskins, and Richard M. Lerner, there are approximately 2 million children of military families who are serving or have served in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

313. Two New Articles Added to "Tackling Toxic Stress" Series

Source: Center for Developing Child at Harvard University - September 19, 2013

The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University has added the following two new articles to its Tackling Toxic Stress series:

  • Innovating in Early Head Start: Can Reducing Toxic Stress Improve Outcomes for Young Children? (2013) by Carol Gerwin - This article discusses efforts of the Early Head Start program to address the sources and effects of toxic stress, in order to help families in the most difficult circumstances give their children the best chance to succeed in life.
  • Using Science to Drive New Approaches to Child Welfare (2013) by Carol Gerwin - This article discusses how the federal Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) is encouraging states to integrate social and emotional well-being into child welfare's longstanding emphasis on ensuring safety and permanent placements for children experiencing abuse or neglect. The article highlights Washington state's focus on prevention and efforts in Illinois to improve foster care.

314. Proposed Rule: Assistance to States for the Education of Children with Disabilities

Source: U.S. Department of Education - September 18, 2013

On September 18, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education published a notice in the Federal Register inviting comments from states and local education agencies on proposed amendments to the regulations under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) regarding local maintenance of effort requirements. To learn more, see the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking: Assistance to States for the Education of Children with Disabilities - Maintenance of Effort. Comments must be received on or before December 2, 2013.

315. $15.1 Million Awarded to Enhance States' Kindergarten Entry Assessments

Source: U.S. Department of Education - September 12, 2013

On September 12, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education announced that it has awarded more than $15.1 million in Enhanced Assessment Grants (EAGs) to help states develop or enhance their Kindergarten Entry Assessments. North Carolina and a consortium of partner states (Arizona, Delaware, Iowa, Maine, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Washington DC, South Carolina) will receive $6.1 million; Maryland and its partner states (Connecticut, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Ohio) will receive $4.9 million, and Texas will receive $3.9 million. To learn more about how the grants will be used, see the full press release. Information about the new awards is also available on the U.S. Department of Education's EAG Program webpage.

316. Raising Young Children in a New Country: Supporting Early Learning and Healthy Development

Source: Bridging Refugee Youth and Children's Services & National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness - September 5, 2013

Bridging Refugee Youth and Children's Services (BRYCS) and the Office of Head Start's National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness (NCCLR) recently collaborated to publish a new illustrated handbook for immigrant families raising children between the ages of 0 and 5. Raising Young Children in a New Country: Supporting Early Learning and Healthy Development is designed to provide families with basic information about early childhood development, age appropriate discipline strategies, and the availability of services, support, and family engagement opportunities. It highlights the following six themes: family well-being; safety and protection; guidance and discipline; healthy brain development; early learning and school readiness; and connecting to early care and education. The handbook is also available in Arabic and will soon be available in Spanish.

317. New Affordable Care Act and Early Learning Webpage

Source: U.S Department of Education, Administration for Children & Families - September 5, 2013

The U.S Department of Health and Human Services's Administration for Children & Families (ACF) recently launched a new webpage on The Affordable Care Act: What It Means for Children, Families, and Early Childhood Programs. The webpage is designed to help early learning providers answer questions about the upcoming launch of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Health Insurance Marketplace. Open enrollment in the Marketplace starts October 1, with coverage starting as soon as January 1, 2014. To find the information needed to prepare for open enrollment, families and small businesses can visit www.HealthCare.gov or CuidadoDeSalud.gov

318. Final Priorities and Application for 2013 RTT-ELC Competition Released

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - August 30, 2013

The U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services have released the final application for the 2013 Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) Competition. This round will provide approximately $280 million in state-level competitive grants to improve the quality of early learning and development programs and close educational gaps for children with high needs. In response to public comments, the Departments have included a request for data on participation of children to be disaggregated by race and ethnicity and added new priorities related to addressing the unique needs of rural populations and creating preschool through third grade approaches to sustain early learning outcomes. Current grantees are not eligible to apply in the FY 2013 competition. Important dates include:

Learn more about RTT-ELC here. The RTT-ELC Final Priorities, Requirements, Definitions, and Selection Criteria, as well as the Notice of Applications for Awards were published in the Federal Register on August 30, 2013.

319. New Report on Early Childhood Program Participation Released

Source: Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics - August 30, 2012

The Institute of Education Sciences' National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has released a new report, Early Childhood Program Participation, From the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012 (August 2013). The report presents findings from the Early Childhood Program Participation Survey of the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012 (NHES:2012), which collected data on children's participation in relative care, nonrelative care, and center-based care arrangements. It also collected information from parents about the main reason for choosing care, what factors were important to parents when choosing a care arrangement, and parents' participation in various learning activities with their children. Some key findings include:

  • Approximately 60% of children 5 and younger not enrolled in kindergarten were in at least one weekly nonparental care arrangement.
  • Among children with relative care, the primary caregivers for 78% were grandparents in the primary relative care arrangement.
  • Approximately 95% of children ages three to five who were not yet in kindergarten had parents who read to them in the past week; 83% had parents who told them a story; 98% had parents who taught them letters, words, or numbers; 94% had parents who sang songs with them; and 86% had parents who worked on arts and crafts with them.

320. New Guidance Letter Addresses Bullying of Children with Disabilities

Source: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services - August 20, 2013

On August 20, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) published a Dear Colleague Letter on Bullying that addresses bullying of children with disabilities. The letter states that children with disabilities are disproportionately affected by bullying and bullying of a child with disabilities is considered a denial of a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE), if it results in the child not getting meaningful educational benefit. The letter also explains that placing a child in a more restrictive "protected" setting to avoid bullying behavior may constitute a denial of the requirement schools have to provide FAPE in the least restrictive environment. An enclosure to the letter, Effective Evidence-based Practices for Preventing and Addressing Bullying, offers strategies schools can use to intervene and prevent bullying.

321. Ready or Not, Here Comes the Kindergarten Class of 2013

Source: Child Trends - August 21, 2013

Close to four million children in the U.S. will start kindergarten this fall. Child Trends, a nonprofit, nonpartisan research center examined a range of available nationally representative data to provide a portrait of the kindergarten class of 2013. Overall, the data shows that these children are "happy, eager to learn, resilient, and have affectionate relationships with their parents," according to David Murphey, Child Trends senior researcher and co-author of the report with Research Assistant Mae Cooper. To learn more, see Ready or Not, Here Comes the Kindergarten Class of 2013 (August 21, 2013). The Child Trends DataBank examines and monitors more than 100 indicators that focus on risks and positive developments for children.

322. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) for Young Children

Source: Smithsonian Magazine - Retrieved August 16, 2013

Two recent issues of Smithsonian Magazine featured articles related to the benefits of introducing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) topics to children at an early age. Both articles were written by Lisa Guernsey, Director of the Early Education Initiative at the New America Foundation.

323. Comment Period on Proposed Child Care Rule Extended

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care - August 13, 2013

The public comment period for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' proposed Child Care Rule has been extended through August 23, 2013. The proposed rule would provide the first comprehensive update of Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) regulations since 1998. It seeks to better protect the health and safety of children in child care by making changes in four key areas: (1) improving health and safety; (2) improving the quality of child care; (3) establishing family-friendly policies; and (4) strengthening program integrity. See the Federal Register Notice for more information.

324. Markers that Matter: Success Indicators in Early Learning and Education

Source: Foundation Strategy Group - July 17, 2013

The Foundation Strategy Group (FSG), with support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has published a new report, Markers that Matter: Success Indicators in Early Learning and Education (July 2013), by Hallie Preskill, Nathalie Jones, and Afi Tengue. The report identifies a synthesized set of 48 early childhood indicators that reflect healthy development of young children. The indicators were synthesized and prioritized with input from over two dozen expert advisors after reviewing over 1,100 indicators from 11 existing early childhood indicator sets. The authors also identify gaps where more research is needed, particularly to develop indicators that reflect the increasing diversity among young children and their families in the U.S. The indicators can be used to support the healthy development of young children, to better understand and address inequities across racial and cultural groups, and to provide a common language that facilitates communication and coordination on behalf of all young children.

325. New Issue of International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education Available Online

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - Retrieved July 23, 2013

The June 2013 issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is now available online. INT-JECSE is an open-access, peer reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families.

326. Research Findings - Young Children with Autism Benefit Regardless of High-Quality Treatment Model

Source: Frank Porter Graham Child Development, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - July 18, 2013

A new FPG Snapshot summarizes research results from a study finding that preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) who receive high-quality early intervention make significant positive gains during the school year regardless of the comprehensive treatment model used (TEACCH, LEAP or a high-quality special education program without a specific model). The results may shift the field's thinking about treatment models for young children with ASD and may have important implications for special-education programs and school classrooms across the country. To learn more, see The LEAP and TEACCH Comprehensive Treatment Models: Comparing Outcomes for Preschoolers with Autism in High-Quality Classrooms (2013).

Full article citation: Boyd, B. A., Hume, K., McBee, M. T., Alessandri, M., Gutierrez, A., Johnson, L., ... Odom, S. L. (2013). Comparative efficacy of LEAP, TEACCH and non-model-specific special education programs for preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Advance online publication. doi:10.1007/s10803-013-1877-9

327. Six Research Reports on the Use of Socially Interactive Robots for Intervening with Young Children with Disabilities

Source: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute - July 17, 2013

The Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute has published six new research reports detailing findings from the Utility of Socially Interactive Robots Project. The project involved a series of studies using socially interactive robots for promoting children's social-emotional, joint attention, vocalization production, conversational turns, and language development. Participants in the studies were young children (18 months to 5 years) with disabilities and their families. The project focused on how interaction with social robots affects children's language and communication development.

328. Two New Early Head Start Technical Assistances Papers

Source: Early Head Start National Resource Center - July 3, 2013

The Early Head Start National Resource Center recently published the following two technical assistances papers that provide strategies to support and strengthen quality infant and toddler care:

329. Applications for New Awards for Fiscal Year 2013 from the U.S. Department of Education

Source: U.S. Department of Education - July 5, 2013

The U.S. Department of Education recently published the following invitations to apply for new awards in the Federal Register.

330. Dual Language Learners: Effective Instruction in Early Childhood

Source: American Educator - Retrieved June 28, 2013

The Summer 2013 issue of the American Educator, published by the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), includes an article summarizing research on effective early education for Dual Language Learners (DLLs). Dual Language Learners: Effective Instruction in Early Childhood (2013), by Claude Goldenberg, Judy Hicks, and Ira Lit, finds that preschool teachers can best educate young children learning their home language and English by using children's primary language where possible, adopting effective practices for building English language skills, and involving families in supporting children's learning.

331. Comment Request - Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge Annual Performance Report

Source: U.S. Department of Education - June 28, 2013

On June 28, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education (ED) posted a notice in the Federal Register requesting comments on the following agency information collection activity - Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) Annual Performance Report. The RTT-ELC program is designed to improve state systems of early care and education, in order to prepare more children for kindergarten. ED is proposing an annual performance report for this program that will collect data on the performance measures and the selection criteria described in the application. Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before August 27, 2013.

332. A Framework for Choosing a State-Level Early Childhood Governance System

Source: Build Initiative - Retrieved June 21, 2013

The Build Initiative recently published a new paper, A framework for choosing a state-level early childhood governance system (May 2013), by R. Elliot and K. Lipper. The paper discusses current state practices for oversight of policies and programs related to children from birth to age five and analyzes different governance approaches, with a particular focus on states that consolidate programs in the state education agency. It also describes the values and policy choices reflected in each governance approach and analyzes why a state might choose one approach over another, based on its context and interests.

333. The State of the World's Children 2013: Children with Disabilities

Source: United Nations Children's Fund - Retrieved June 5, 2013

The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) has released its latest annual report examining key issues affecting children around the world. This year's report focuses on children with disabilities, finding that these children are often the most marginalized individuals in the world. The State of the World's Children 2013: Children with Disabilities (May 2013) examines the barriers that deprive children with disabilities of their rights and prevent them from participating fully their communities. The report also discusses key elements of inclusive societies that enable children with disabilities to flourish and make their contribution to the world.

334. A Strategic Road-Map For Reducing Child Poverty

Source: Academic Pediatric Association - Retrieved June 6, 2013

The Academic Pediatric Association (APA) Task Force on Childhood Poverty recently issued A Strategic Road-Map: Committed to Bringing the Voice of Pediatricians to the Most Important Problem Facing Children in the U.S. Today (2013). The Roadmap points out that one in five children in the U.S. lives below the federal poverty level and almost one in two are poor or near poor. Childhood poverty disproportionately affects very young children, racial/ethnic minorities, Native Americans, and children in immigrant families. It can have life-long negative consequences related to health and well-being; educational outcomes; social and emotional development; drug and alcohol abuse; criminal behavior; and intergenerational poverty. The Roadmap outlines a number of strategies the Task Force will focus on to both reduce childhood poverty and address the negative effects of poverty on children's physical and mental health development.

335. Research Briefs on Applying Implementation Science to Early Care and Education Research and Evaluation

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - June 6, 2013

On June 6, 2013, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) posted the following three research briefs on their Web site. The briefs are meant to help facilitate the use of implementation science frameworks, methodologies, and analysis in early care and education research and program evaluation.

The briefs are a product of the Child Care and Early Education Policy and Research Analysis and Technical Expertise Project.

336. New Series of Articles on "Tackling Toxic Stress"

Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University - May 30, 2013

The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University recently launched a new multi-part series of journalistic articles for the web entitled, Tackling Toxic Stress. The series examines how policymakers, researchers, and practitioners are re-thinking services for children and families based on the science of early childhood development and an understanding of the consequences of adverse early experiences and toxic stress. The first two stories in the series describe how the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has made early brain and child development a strategic priority and is working to help its 60,000 physician members consider children's risks for toxic stress when doing routine pediatric checkups.

337. Autism Speaks Launches "Maybe" Campaign to Reach African American and Hispanic Parents

Source: Autism Speaks - May 24, 2013

Autism Speaks recently launched a new series of public service advertisements in English and Spanish specifically designed to reach African American and Hispanic parents. According to research, children in these communities are often diagnosed later than the national average. The new "Maybe" campaign encourages parents to learn the early signs of autism and to contact their pediatrician if they have concerns. Autism Speaks also launched Early Access to Care, an initiative designed to lower the age of diagnosis in all communities.

338. National IDEA Data Center - Notice of Final Priority and Invitation to Apply

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services - May 20, 2013

On May 20, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) published a notice of final priority in the Federal Register to establish a National Technical Assistance Center To Improve State Capacity To Accurately Collect and Report IDEA Data (Data Center). The Data Center will provide TA to improve the capacity of States to meet IDEA data collection and reporting requirements. This priority is effective June 19, 2013.

On May 20th, OSERS also published a notice inviting applications for a new award for fiscal year (FY) 2013 to fund a cooperative agreement that will support the establishment and operation of the Data Center. Applications are due by July 19, 2013.

339. Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge Program - Proposed Priorities Posted for Public Comment

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - May 20, 2013

On May 20, 2013, the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services (the Departments) published proposed priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria under the Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) Grant program. The RTT-ELC program is designed to improve state systems of early care and education in order to prepare more children for kindergarten. The proposed priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria include five substantive changes to those used in the FY 2011 RTT-ELC competition. Comments are requested and must be received by June 19, 2013.

Last month, the Departments announced they will invest the majority of the 2013 Race to the Top funds for another Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge competition. According to the press release, about $370 million will be available this year for states to develop new approaches to increase high-quality early learning opportunities and close the school readiness gap.

340. Kindergarten Entry Assessment Competition - Invitation to Apply

Source: U.S. Department of Education - May 23, 2013

On May 23, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education published a notice in the Federal Register inviting applications for grants under the Enhanced Assessment Grants (EAG) program to support the development or enhancement of Kindergarten Entry Assessments (KEA) aligned with a common set of early learning and development standards. The purpose of the KEA is to provide, at kindergarten entry, valid, reliable, and fair information on each child's learning and development across the essential domains of school readiness. For more information, see the Federal Notice. The deadline for submitting applications is July 8, 2013.

341. Research Report - Dual Language Learners: Research Informing Policy

Source: Center for Early Care and Education Research-Dual Language Learners - Retrieved May 16, 2013

The Center for Early Care and Education Research-Dual Language Learners (CECERDLL) at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill has published a new research report, Dual Language Learners: Research Informing Policy (May 2013). The report provides foundational information about young children 0-5 years of age who are dual-language learners (DLLs) and offers suggestions for how to better coordinate policies and practices aimed at supporting DLLs between and across early care education and K-12 settings. It highlights research findings which show that dual-language learners develop language and literacy skills differently than their monolingual peers and benefit most in early childhood programs that regularly expose them to both their first and second language.

342. Effect of Provider Payment Reforms on Maternal and Child Health Services

Source: National Governors Association - May 16, 2013

The National Governors Association (NGA) has published a new paper, Effect of Provider Payment Reforms on Maternal and Child Health Services (2013), which describes a number of different provider payment reforms states are adopting to reduce costs and improve health outcomes for women and their children. Some of the strategies described include: medical/health homes, quality-based payment incentives, bundled payments for episodes of care, and accountable care organizations (ACOs). The paper discusses how these reforms can potentially improve outcomes, particularly for vulnerable populations such as children with special health care needs and women of color.

343. Update on Education and Special Education Research Grant Competitions for FY 2014

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences - April 23, 2013

On April 23, 2013, the Director of the Institute of Education Sciences (the Institute) published a Federal Register Notice about the Institute's FY 2014 competitions for grants to support education research and special education research. The Institute's purpose in awarding these grants is to provide national leadership in expanding fundamental knowledge and understanding of developmental and school readiness outcomes for infants and toddlers with or at risk for disability, and of education outcomes for all students from early childhood education through postsecondary and adult education. The Federal Register Notice states that due to limited funding, the Institute's National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) will not hold competitions in FY 2014. Instead, NCSER expects to fund a number of previously submitted high-quality grant proposals from the existing slates of applicants developed during the FY 2013 competitions. See NCSER Competitions for more information.

344. Request for Comments - IDEA Part C and Part B State Performance Plan and Annual Performance Report

Source: U.S. Department of Education - April 15, 2013

On April 15, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education published the following Notices of Proposed Information Collection in the Federal Register. Comments are encouraged and must be submitted by June 14, 2013.

345. Next Round of Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge and Race to the Top-District Competitions Announced

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - April 16, 2013

On April 16, 2013, the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services announced they will invest the majority of the 2013 Race to the Top funds for another Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge competition. According to the press release, about $370 million will be available this year for states to develop new approaches to increase high-quality early learning opportunities and close the school readiness gap. About $120 million of the 2013 funds will be used for a second round of the Race to the Top-District competition. In a Federal Register notice published on April 16, 2013, the Department of Education proposed a set of priorities for this year's District competition, which will support innovative reform at the local level. Comments must be received on or before May 16, 2013

More information about the Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge and the Race to the Top-District competition, including current grantees, is available on the Department's website. Additional details about both programs will be announced in the coming months.

346. New! Early Hearing Detection and Intervention-Pediatric Audiology Links to Services (EHDI-PALS) Directory

Source: EHDI-PALS Advisory Group - April 16, 2013

The EHDI-PALS Advisory Group recently announced the release of a new Early Hearing Detection and Intervention-Pediatric Audiology Links to Services (EHDI-PALS) Directory. The EHDI-PALS Directory provides information about facilities that offer pediatric audiology services to young children who are younger than five years of age. All of the facilities included report that they have licensed audiologists and the right equipment and expertise to serve young children. See also, the Parent Resources page, which provides many Questions/Answers that will help parents get an idea of the kinds of things to ask when setting up appointments or to learn more about their childs hearing.

347. New Policy Brief on Improving Access to Early Identification and Intervention

Source: ZERO TO THREE Western Office - Retrieved April 16, 2013

The ZERO TO THREE Western Office recently published a new policy brief, Improving Access to Early Identification and Intervention: 211 LA County Developmental Screening and Care Coordination (2013). The brief describes the 211 LA County telephone-based developmental screening and care coordination program and provides policy recommendations for expanding and replicating the model. A discussion of the research supporting universal developmental screening is also included.

348. Early Intervention Supplement for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Programs

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - Retrieved April 4, 2013

On April 1, 2013, a supplement to the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing (JCIH) 2007 Position Statement on Principles and Guidelines for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Programs was published in Pediatrics, 131(4) doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-0008. The new supplement provides comprehensive guidelines for EHDI programs related to establishing strong early intervention (EI) systems with appropriate expertise to meet the needs of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. To view or download this supplement, see Supplement to the JCIH 2007 Position Statement: Principles and Guidelines for Early Intervention Following Confirmation That a Child Is Deaf or Hard of Hearing (2013).

349. Inequalities at the Starting Line: State Kindergarten Policies

Source: Education Commission of the States - March 28, 2013

The Education Commission of the States (ECS) recently reviewed kindergarten policies across all 50 states and published a new report, Inequalities at the Starting Line: State Kindergarten Policies (March 2013). The report shows that children are not receiving equitable early education opportunities across the states and highlights the significant diversity that exists in state kindergarten policies across and within states. The report raises questions about the implications of having such diverse policies and the potential impact on children's future educational success.

350. Part C 2012 Tipping Points Survey - Results Available Online

Source: IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association - Retrieved March 19, 2013

The IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association (ITCA) has published the results of its 2012 Tipping Points Survey - Part C Implementation: State Challenges and Responses online. The survey is used to help track emerging issues and state responses related to eligibility, finance and decisions regarding continued participation in the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA). Forty-eight states and one jurisdiction completed the survey. ITCA draws no conclusions from the data analysis, but simply reports the data. All information is aggregated and the individual state responses are confidential.

351. New Study Shows Lasting Effects of New Jersey's Abbott Preschool Program

Source: National Institute for Early Education Research - March 20, 2013

On March 20, 2013, the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) released findings from the latest study of New Jersey's Abbott Preschool Program, which showed that children in the state's most disadvantaged communities who participated in the preschool program made significant gains in literacy, language, math and science through 4th and 5th grade. The study found larger gains for children who participated in two years of the preschool program. Additionally, participation was linked to lower retention rates and fewer children needing special education. These findings build on previous results from kindergarten entry and second grade follow-up. See Abbott Preschool Program Longitudinal Effects Study: Fifth Grade Follow-Up (March 2013).

352. New Invitation to Comment - State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education - March 11, 2013

On March 11, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education posted a new Invitation to Comment on the annual, web-based State of Preschool survey, which centralizes data about publicly provided early childhood education opportunities. Data are collected from state agencies responsible for providing early childhood education and made available for secondary analyses. Data collected as part of the survey focus on enrollment counts in state-funded early childhood education programs, funding provided by the states for these programs, and program monitoring and licensing policies. The collected data are then reported, both separately and in combination with extant data available from federal agencies supporting early childhood education programs. Public comments are due on or before April 10, 2013.

353. New Snapshot Examines the Impact of Early Childhood Teacher Education

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - March 11, 2013

A special issue of the Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education addresses the question: For whom and in what ways does early childhood teacher education matter? A new Snapshot from the FPG Child Development Institute summarizes an article in the issue by FPG Senior Scientist Pam Winton and colleagues, who examined the current research base in early childhood teacher education. They note that there is a lack of rigorous research evidence, which makes it difficult to answer the question. Much of the research that exists is descriptive and focused on small samples of students in a few innovative programs. See The Impact of Early Childhood Teacher Education: How to Answer the Unanswerable Question (FPG Snapshot 68, February 2013).

Full article citation: Horm, D., Hyson, M., & Winton, P. (2013). Research on early childhood teacher education: Evidence from three domains and recommendations for moving forward. Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education, 34 (1) 95-112.

354. Summer School Effects in a Randomized Field Trial

Source: What Works Clearinghouse, Institute of Education Sciences - March 1, 2013

The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) has released a new single study review of the report Summer School Effects in a Randomized Field Trial. The study examined the impact of a summer literacy program on kindergarten and first-grade students who were at moderate risk for reading difficulties in one Pacific Northwest school district. The study found, and the WWC confirmed, a statistically significant positive effect of the summer school intervention on student outcomes in the fall of the implementation year for students in both kindergarten and first grade. The study was given a rating of "Meets WWC evidence standards without reservations." Read the full WWC review here.

Citation for the report: Zvoch, K., & Stevens, J. J. (2012). Summer school effects in a randomized field trial. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0885200612000427.

355. Comments on Proposed Priorities Related to Kindergarten-Entry Assessments Due

Source: U.S. Department of Education - February 19, 2012

Comments from the public on the following two proposed additional priorities under the Enhanced Assessment Instruments Grant program, also called the Enhanced Assessment Grants (EAG) program are due on or before February 25, 2013.

  • Proposed Priority 1 - Kindergarten Entry Assessment
  • Proposed Priority 2 - Early Learning Collaborative Efforts Among States

The priorities are designed to support the development or enhancement of kindergarten entry assessments (KEAs) and promote collaboration among States in the development or enhancement of a common KEA. For complete information, see the Federal Register Notice, which was published on January 25, 2013.

356. IDEA Part B Final Regulations on Parental Consent for the Use of Public Benefits or Insurance

Source: U.S. Department of Education - February 14, 2013

On February 14, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education published final regulations related to parental consent for the use of public benefits or insurance (e.g., Medicaid) to pay for services under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), including the Preschool Grants for Children with Disabilities program. The regulations are effective on March 18, 2013. The new regulations amend the Department's regulations in 34 CFR 300.154(d)(2)(iv), which were published in the Federal Register on August 14, 2006. The prior regulations required the public agency responsible for providing a free appropriate public education (FAPE) to a child with a disability under the IDEA to obtain parental consent each time access to public benefits or insurance (e.g., Medicaid) was sought. The new regulations have two basic requirements:

  • First, the public agency must notify parents in writing of a number of safeguards to protect their rights before the public agency accesses the child's or parent's public benefits or insurance to pay for services under the IDEA for the first time and annually thereafter. 34 CFR 300.154(d)(2)(v).
  • Second, the public agency must obtain a one-time written consent from the parent that meets the requirements of 34 CFR 99.30 and 300.622, and also specifies that the parent understands and agrees that the public agency may access the child's or parent's public benefits or insurance to pay for special education or related services under part 300 (services under the IDEA). 34 CFR 300.154(d)(2)(iv).

For additional information see the Department's IDEA Part B Final Regulations on Parental Consent Web page, which includes a one-page summary, as well as a Q&A with non-regulatory guidance on the new regulations.

357. New Paper on Response to Intervention (RTI) in Early Childhood Released

Source: Division for Early Childhood, Council for Exceptional Children - February 12, 2013

On February 12, 2013, the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), and the National Head Start Association (NHSA) announced the release of their jointly-developed paper, Frameworks for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood: Description and Implications (2013). The joint paper was developed to: (1) provide clarification and guidance on the relationship of RTI frameworks to the unique context of early childhood programs serving children from birth until school entry; (2) help to dispel misunderstandings and misconceptions related to RTI in early childhood; and (3) promote a broader understanding and discussion of the topic.

358. Twelve New Reports of Home Visiting Research Available

Source: Pew Home Visiting Campaign - Retrieved February 8, 2013

The Pew Home Visiting Campaign recently published 12 new reports of home visiting research. The reports highlight those program elements that are essential to success, ways to improve existing models, and factors to consider in tailoring home visiting to local contexts and particular target populations. These studies underscore the need for continued evaluation and monitoring of home visiting services in order to maximize effectiveness as programs expand to serve more families in a greater diversity of settings. The full reports and executive summaries are available online.

359. New Grant Notice: Stepping-Up Technology Implementation Program for Children with Disabilities

Source: U.S. Education Department - January 30, 2013

The U.S. Education Department published the following notice in the Federal Register on January 30, 2013: Applications for New Awards: Educational Technology, Media, and Materials for Individuals With Disabilities Program-Stepping-Up Technology Implementation (CFDA Number: 84.327S). The Stepping-up Technology Implementation program is funded to help identify, develop, and disseminate products and resources that promote the effective implementation of evidence-based instructional and assistive technology tools in early childhood or kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12) settings. The deadline for applications is March 18, 2013.

360. New Issue of International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education Available Online

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - January 24, 2013

The December 2012 issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is now available online. INT-JECSE is an open-access, peer reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. This issue features articles from Ghana, Turkey and the United States.

361. Research Brief: Predicting Acceptance of Diversity in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms

Source: National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education - Retrieved January 25, 2013

A recent study examined practices that acknowledge and promote diversity in pre-Kindergarten classrooms. Findings indicate that acceptance of diversity is a component of positive environments for young children, particularly in classrooms with high poverty levels where there is ethnic and linguistic diversity. However, it is rare for pre-Kindergarten classrooms to incorporate the highest levels of accepting and acknowledging diversity. To learn more, see the latest research brief from the National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education (NCRECE), Predicting Acceptance of Diversity in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms (2013), by Kay Sanders & Jason T. Downer.

362. Complex Thinking Skills Begin Forming As Early As 4.5 Years of Age

Source: University of Chicago - January 23, 2013.

New research findings from the University of Chicago and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill demonstrate that children begin to show signs of higher-level thinking skills as early as 4.5 years of age. Using large-scale longitudinal data from the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development study, the authors examined tests children took at age 4.5, when they were in first grade, third grade, and at age 15. Findings showed a strong relationship between high scores among children who, as preschoolers, had strong vocabularies and were good at monitoring and controlling their responses (executive function) to later ability on tests of understanding analogies. Research suggests that executive function may be trainable through pathways such as preschool curriculum, exercise and impulse control training. For more information, see the news release from the University of Chicago.

Full citation: Richland, L. E., & Burchinal, M. R. (2013). Early Executive Function Predicts Reasoning Development. Psychological Science, 24, 87-92.

363. Applications for New Awards - Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs - January 15, 2013

On January 15, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) published the following grant announcements in the Federal Register:

Application packages for the 84.325D and 84.325K competitions are also posted on the Department's FY 2013 Discretionary Grant Competitions Web page.

364. Policy Report on Supporting Kinship Families

Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation - Retrieved January 18, 2013

In a recent policy report, the Annie E. Casey Foundation discusses the increased number of children living with extended family and close friends, a longtime practice known as kinship care. Stepping Up for Kids: What Government and Communities Should Do to Support Kinship Families (2012) includes the latest data for states, the District of Columbia, and the nation, as well as a set of recommendations on how to support kinship families.

365. Part C Early Intervention for Infants and Toddlers: Percentage Eligible Versus Served

Source: Pediatrics - January 1, 2013

An article recently published in Pediatrics compares estimates of the percentage of children younger than age 3 who are likely to be eligible for Part C early intervention services in each state and Washington, DC, based on the eligibility definitions currently in use across the country, with the proportion of children enrolled in Part C in each of those jurisdictions. Results show that states' eligibility criteria vary widely and many children who would qualify for services are not receiving them. See the article abstract for a more complete summary of findings.

Full citation: Rosenberg, S. A., Robinson, C. C., Shaw, E. F., & Ellison, M. C. (2013). Part C early intervention for infants and toddlers: Percentage eligible versus served. Pediatrics, 131(1). doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-1662

366. Are Minority Children Disproportionately Represented in Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education?

Source: Educational Researcher - Retrieved January 11, 2013

Study findings recently published in the Educational Researcher examine whether children who are racial-ethnic minorities are disproportionately represented in early intervention and/or early childhood special education (EI/ECSE). The researchers analyzed 7,950 48-month-olds participating in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), a nationally representative data set of children born in the United States in 2001. Findings indicated that by 48 months of age, minority children are disproportionately underrepresented in EI/ECSE. See the article abstract for a more complete summary of findings.

Full citation: Morgan, P. L., Farkas, G., Hillemeier, M. M., & Maczuga, S. (2012, December). Are minority children disproportionately represented in early intervention and early childhood special education?, Educational Researcher, 41(9). doi: 10.3102/0013189X12459678

367. Effectiveness of Developmental Screening for the Identification of Developmental Delays

Source: PolicyLab at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Retrieved December 31, 2012

PolicyLab at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia recently published data from the Translating Evidence-based Developmental Screening (TEDS) study, the largest study to date to confirm the feasibility and effectiveness of standardized developmental screening in urban primary care settings. See Effectiveness of Developmental Screening in an Urban Setting, Pediatrics, published online December 17, 2012, doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-0765. Some key findings include:

  • Standardized developmental screening is feasible in a busy, urban primary care practice and effective in identifying developmental delay.
  • Children were almost twice as likely to be identified with delay if screened using a standardized tool; however standardized developmental screening was not sufficient to ensure that children received needed services.
  • Only 58% of children identified with delay were given a referral for Early Intervention services and only 50% of referred children completed a multi-disciplinary evaluation, required to determine eligibility for services.

Last summer, eNotes highlighted PolicyLab's Evidence to Action brief, SERIES: An Integrated Approach to Supporting Child Development (2012), which discusses the need to promote a more coordinated approach to ensuring that children with identified developmental needs are linked to appropriate services.

368. Third Grade Follow-up to the Head Start Impact Study: Final Report

Source: Administration for Children and Families - Retrieved December 31, 2012

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) recently released Third Grade Follow-up to the Head Start Impact Study: Final Report (2012), which looks at the effects of Head Start on a childs cognitive and academic, health, emotional and social development into elementary school. The findings suggest that although Head Start study participants who entered the program in the fall of 2002 showed greater skills than a control group after one year in the program, by third grade there was no significant difference between the two groups.

See also, the related blog post from the New America Foundation's Early Education Initiative: First Thoughts on Study of Head Start's Impact on 3rd Graders (December 21, 2012), by Lisa Guernsey.

369. Estimated Participation in Early Education Programs for Children Ages Two to Four in 2010

Source: National Institute for Early Education Research - Retrieved December 31, 2012

The National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) has released a new working paper, Estimated Participation and Hours in Early Care and Education by Type of Arrangement and Income at Ages 2 to 4 in 2010 (December 2012), by Steve Barnett and Milagros Nores. The paper estimates participation in early childhood education programs by childs age, program setting, family income level, and childs household language. By combining data from the Census Bureaus Current Population Survey (CPS), the National Household Education Survey (NHES), and information collected by NIEER for the State of Preschool Yearbook, these estimates provide a detailed look at primary and secondary care arrangements for children ages 2 to 4 in 2010.

370. Data for Action 2012: The Data Quality Campaign's Eighth Annual Analysis of State Education Data Systems

Source: Data Quality Campaign - Retrieved December 31, 2012

The Data Quality Campaign has released its eighth annual analysis of state education data systems, which looks at the progress states have made toward effective use of data. The report finds that states are making progress in supporting effective data use, but more work remains to be done.

The report includes information on how states link K-12 data with early childhood data, including early childhood special education, state prekindergarten programs, subsidized child care, and Head Start/Early Head Start.

371. The Common Core State Standards: Caution and Opportunity for Early Childhood Education

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children - November 26, 2012

On November 26, 2012, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) released a new paper, The Common Core State Standards: Caution and Opportunity for Early Childhood Education (November 2012). Currently, 45 states have adopted the Common Core State Standards for English language arts and mathematics. NAEYC's paper attempts to provide a framework for the early education field to consider "not only the aspects of the Common Core that may pose threats to early childhood education, but also those aspects that may provide early childhood education with the opportunity to exert its collected research and experience upward into K-12 education." The aim is to ensure that learning standards for young children, before they enter school and in the early elementary years, are consistent with evidence-based approaches to supporting the development of young children.

372. Supporting Babies and Families Impacted by Caregiver Mental Health Problems, Substance Abuse, and Trauma

Source: ZERO TO THREE and SAMHSA - November 14, 2012

A new publication prepared for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) by ZERO TO THREE provides resources to help service providers better understand and engage their communities in responding to children whose caregivers are negatively impacted by mental illness, substance abuse, or trauma. Supporting Babies and Families Impacted by Caregiver Mental Health Problems, Substance Abuse, and Trauma: A Community Action Guide (2012) includes the following sections:

  • Section 1: What's So Important about Birth to 5?
  • Section 2: Threats to Resilience
  • Section 3: Building a Sturdy Foundation for Children: Protective Factors that Promote Resilience
  • Section 4: A Strategic Framework for Action
  • Section 5: Moving Forward

373. New Fact Sheets Highlight 2010-2011 Data on Head Start and Early Head Start

Source: CLASP - November 15, 2012

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) has published the following two new fact sheets summarizing the characteristics of Head Start preschool and Early Head Start programs in 2011 and the children and families served by these programs. The new fact sheets use data from the Head Start Program Information Report (PIR) for 2010-2011.

374. Supporting Healthy Child Development through Medical Homes

Source: National Academy for State Health Policy - November 12, 2012

The National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) has published a new brief, Supporting Healthy Child Development through Medical Homes: Strategies from ABCD III States (November 2012). The brief draws from the experiences of several states (Arkansas, Illinois, Minnesota, Oklahoma, and Oregon) that have developed and tested models to improve care coordination for children with or at risk of developmental delay through the Assuring Better Child Health and Development (ABCD) III initiative. The medical home has been a key mechanism in their improvement efforts. This brief outlines opportunities and lessons for state policymakers to strengthen medical home initiatives by explicitly addressing the needs of children.

375. Building the Legacy Training Curriculum on Part C of IDEA 2004: The Basics of Early Intervention (Module 1)

Source: National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities - November 1, 2012

The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY) has released the first module of its Building the Legacy for Our Youngest Children with Disabilities: Training Curriculum on Part C of IDEA 2004. The Basics of Early Intervention (Module 1) provides training materials related to 8 basic steps in the early intervention process, 7 acronyms to know, and 9 key definitions in Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It includes slideshows, trainer's guides, and handouts for participants. The training curriculum is being produced by NICHCY at the request of the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP). It is primarily meant to be used by trainers to train others about the early intervention program under Part C of IDEA. See information about the training curriculum to learn more.

376. Six Videos on America's Investment in Early Childhood from TEDxMiamiUniversity

Source: Miami University - Retrieved November 6, 2012

On September 14, 2012, Miami University hosted TEDxMiamiUniversity, a program featuring six speakers with a variety of perspectives related to America's investment in early childhood development and education. Videos of the talks are now available to the public online. They include:

  • "We're Not fighting! We're SAVING!": Understanding Early Childhood Education - Debora Wisneski
  • The Extraordinary Return on Investment in High-Quality Preschool - Larry Schweinhart
  • Desegregation and (Un)Equal Opportunity: A Story About School Resources - Rucker Johnson
  • Kindergarten Today: Is the Match Between High-stakes Outputs and Low-impact Inputs Cost-effective? - Doris Fromberg
  • Investing in Kids: Early Childhood Programs and Local Economic Development - Timothy Bartik
  • The Fetal Origins of Success - Douglas Almond

Please see About TEDx and TEDTalks usage policy for more information.

377. Quality Inclusive Practices: Resources and Landing Pads

Source: National Professional Development Center on Inclusion - Retrieved November 7, 2012

The National Professional Development Center on Inclusion has developed eight new Landing Pads to help teachers, administrators, professional development providers, and families locate resources to support the use of evidence-based practices that promote the inclusion of young children of diverse abilities. Each Landing Pad includes resources that are organized into four sections: Why Do It? (the evidence-base), Read About It (books, chapters, and articles), See For Yourself (videos and demonstrations), and Find It Online (websites with additional resources).

378. Literacy Challenges for the Twenty-First Century

Source: The Future of Children - Retrieved October 24, 2012

The Fall 2012 issue of The Future of Children, entitled Literacy Challenges for the Twenty-First Century, explores current levels of literacy in the U.S., their determinants, and a variety of strategies to improve literacy. The Role of Out-of-School Factors in the Literacy Problem, by Jane Waldfogel, notes that literacy gaps vary widely in children entering school according to their socio-economic status, race and ethnicity, and immigrant status. The author discusses the importance of strong preschool programs, especially for children from low-income and non-English speaking families, and finds that addressing early literacy gaps requires tailoring responses depending on which group of children is being targeted.

379. First Quarter 2012 OSEP Policy Documents Now Available Online

Source: U.S. Department of Education - October 8, 2012

On October 8, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) posted its First Quarter 2012 Policy Letters (January 1 through March 31, 2012) online. These letters address issues related to the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). A Federal Register Notice published on September 13, 2012 includes brief summaries of the quarterly letters. A subset of OSEP policy letters related to the early childhood provisions of the IDEA (Part C and Part B, Section 619) can be accessed on the NECTAC Web site.

380. Child Poverty and Its Lasting Consequence

Source: Urban Institute - Retrieved October 11, 2012

The Urban Institute has published a new report, Child Poverty and Its Lasting Consequence (September 2012), which examines child poverty in the U.S. and ways to target particularly vulnerable children by answering four key research questions:

  • What share of newborns is poor, and how often do these children remain poor?
  • What family characteristics relate most strongly to childhood poverty persistence?
  • What are the implications of present-day childhood poverty for adult outcomes?
  • How do other family characteristics and childhood experiences relate to adult outcomes?

The report also provides insight into how young poor children can be helped.

381. NGA Report on Aligning Early Childhood Education and K-12 Reforms

Source: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices - October 2, 2012

On October 2, 2012, the National Governors Association (NGA) Center for Best Practices released a new white paper, Governor's Role in Aligning Early Education and K-12 Reforms: Challenges, Opportunities, and Benefits for Children (2012), which discusses the need for states to align their early childhood education and K-12 reforms so that they support and reinforce each other's goals and approaches, especially across the birth-to-grade 3 continuum. The paper highlights areas where this work is particularly important, provides recommendations, and features promising developments in states.

382. Early Childhood Development and Disability: A Discussion Paper

Source: World Health Organization and UNICEF - Retrieved October 2, 2012

The World Health Organization and UNICEF recently published a new paper, Early Childhood Development and Disability: A Discussion Paper (September 2012). The paper provides an overview of disability in early childhood and underscores the need to strengthen and scale up early childhood development initiatives, in order to ensure that children with disabilities can participate meaningfully in their homes, schools and communities. It is meant to encourage international discussion, planning and action on issues related to disability, early childhood development, and early intervention.

383. InBrief - Executive Function: Essential Skills for Life and Learning

Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University - September 27, 2012

Executive function skills help us to focus on multiple streams of information at the same time and revise plans as necessary. A new evidence base has identified these skills as being essential for school achievement, success in work, and healthy lives. The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University has published a new two-page summary, InBrief: Executive Function: Essential Skills for Life and Learning (2012), outlining how these skills develop, what can disrupt their development, and how supporting them pays off in school and life.

See also, the Center's related 5-minute video, Executive Function: Skills for Life and Learning (2012), as well as a new online training module to help early care and education providers better understand and support the development of executive function skills, produced by the Washington State Department of Early Learning, in collaboration with the Center's Frontiers of Innovation initiative.

384. Building a Competitive Future Right from the Start: How Paid Leave Strengthens 21st Century Families

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - September 27, 2012

The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has published a new brief, Building a Competitive Future Right from the Start: How Paid Leave Strengthens 21st Century Families (September 2012) by Susan Ochshorn and Curtis Skinner. The brief provides a brief history of paid family leave policy in the United States and abroad; synthesizes cutting-edge knowledge about paid leave and its impact on family and civic life; and concludes with a set of recommendations for policymakers, researchers, public health and early childhood stakeholders, business leaders, and federal, state, and local education agencies to guide the work going forward.

385. Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge: Phase 2 - Application Notice and Final Requirements

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - September 20, 2012

On September 20, 2012, the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services published the Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC ) - Phase 2 Notice Inviting Applications, as well as the Notice of Final Requirements (CFDA No. 84.412A) in the Federal Register. The full RTT-ELC Phase 2 application is posted on the RTT-ELC Web site. RTT-ELC Phase 2 guidance and frequently asked questions are also available online.

386. Two New Research Syntheses from the Center for Early Literacy Learning

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - September 18, 2012

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) has published the following two new CELLreviews, which provide practice-based research syntheses of early literacy learning studies.

Effects of Motionese on Infant and Toddler Visual Attention and Behavioral Responsiveness (2012), by Carl J. Dunst, Ellen Gorman, Deborah W. Hamby. CELLreviews CELLreviews, 5(9)

Child-Directed Motionese With Infants and Toddlers With and Without Hearing Impairments (2012), by Carl J. Dunst, Ellen Gorman, Deborah W. Hamby. CELLreviews, 5(8)

387. Two New Research Syntheses from the Center for Early Literacy Learning

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - September 13, 2012

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) has published the following two new CELLreviews, which provide practice-based research syntheses of early literacy learning studies.

Assistive Technology and the Communication and Literacy Development of Young Children with Disabilities (2012), by Carl J. Dunst, Carol M. Trivette, Deborah W. Hamby, CELLreviews, 5(7).

Effect of Interest-Based Interventions on the Social-Communicative Behavior of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (2012), by Carl J. Dunst, Carol M. Trivette, Deborah W. Hamby. CELLreviews, 5(6)

388. Sleep Problems Before Age 5 Associated with Greater Need for Special Education at Age 8

Source: Pediatrics - September 3, 2012

A recently published article in Pediatrics (September 3, 2012) reports that children with disrupted sleep patterns through five years of age were more likely to have special education needs (SEN) at eight years old. A prior history of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) symptoms was associated with a 40% greater chance of SEN; children with the worst SDB symptoms had a 60% greater chance of SEN. For each year of behavioral sleep problems, there was a 7% increased chance of SEN. The findings are based on more than 11,000 children in southwest England and highlight the need for early identification and management of both respiratory and behavioral sleep problems. See the abstract here. See also, a related article published in WebMD on Sept. 4, 2012 - Sleep Problems Linked to More Special Ed

Full citation: Bonuck, K., Rao, T., & Xu, L. (2012). Population-based cohort study pediatric sleep disorders and special educational need at 8 years: A population-based cohort study. Pediatrics, published online September 3, 2012. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-0392

389. Repeated Book Reading and Preschoolers' Early Literacy Development

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - September 4, 2012

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) has published a new research synthesis, Repeated Book Reading and Preschoolers' Early Literacy Development, CELLreviews, 5(5), 2012, by Carol M. Trivette, Andrew Simkus, Carl J. Dunst, and Deborah W. Hamby. The effects of repeated book reading on children's early literacy and language development were examined in this meta-analysis of 16 studies including 466 child participants. Results indicated that repeated book reading influenced both story-related vocabulary and story-related comprehension. Findings also showed that the adults' use of manipulatives or illustrations related to the story, positive reinforcement of children's comments, explanation concerning the story when asked, and open-ended questions to prompt child verbal responses were associated with positive child outcomes. Implications for practice are described. See all CELLreviews.

390. Webinar Provides Tour of the Prek-3rd Data Resource Center Website

Source: PreK-3rd Data Resource Center - August 31, 2012

On August 20, 2012, the PreK-3rd Data Resource Center at the University of Michigan Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) held a webinar to introduce users to their website, which provides access to eight longitudinal datasets and user guides selected for their potential to inform preK-3rd policy and practice. The most recently added dataset is the Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS), which follows the achievement of children with disabilities (physical, mental, emotional) in prekindergarten, kindergarten, and elementary school and the factors associated with achievement. View the webinar for additional information.

391. 2012 Race to the Top-District Competition - Notice Inviting Applications

Source: U.S. Department of Education - August 16, 2012

On August 16, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education published a Federal Register Notice Inviting Applications for Race to the Top - District Competition Awards (CFDA Number: 84.416) for fiscal year (FY) 2012. Under this competition, individual school districts can apply for up to $40 million (based on their size) to support locally directed improvements in learning and teaching. See the news release and some fast facts here. Although this competition doesn't focus on early learning, early learning initiatives can be included in a district's application - see Ed Dept's District-Level Competition Keeps Door Open for PreK-3rd Reforms (August 13, 2012), by Lisa Guernsey of the New America's Early Education Initiative.

  • Deadline for Notice of Intent to Apply: August 30, 2012.
  • Date of Application Webinar: August 16 and 21, 2012.
  • Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: October 30, 2012.

392. Grant Notices and Final Priorities from the U.S. Department of Education

Source: U.S. Department of Education - August 2, 2012

On August 2, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education published the following new grant notices and final priorities in the Federal Register:

393. Research Report on Children's Deaths in Child Care

Source: Child Care Aware of America - July 29, 2012

Child Care Aware of America (formerly NACCRRA, the National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies) has published a new research paper, Why Aren't We Outraged? Children Dying in Child Care Across America (July 2012), which discusses what can be done to prevent children's deaths in child care, including uniform reporting of child care deaths, minimum training for child care providers, and effective monitoring by states.

394. Foundation for Child Development Announces 2013 Young Scholars Competition

Source: Foundation for Child Development - July 18, 2012

The Foundation for Child Development (FCD) has announced its 2013 Young Scholars Competition. The Young Scholars Program seeks to support a new generation of scholars conducting research on the development of children in immigrant families from birth to age ten, particularly those who are living in low-income families. Given the limited research on young immigrant children, proposals focused on children from birth to age eight are highly encouraged. The deadline for proposals is Thursday, November 1, 2012.

395. Grant Notice - Innovative Approaches to Literacy Program

Source: U.S. Department of Education - July 11, 2012

The U.S. Department of Education recently published the following notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2012: Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) Program (CFDA) Number: 84.215G. The IAL program is designed to support the implementation of high-quality plans for childhood literacy activities and book distribution efforts that are supported by at least one study that meets the definition of scientifically valid research. It is aimed at children from birth through 12th grade, with a competitive priority for improving early learning outcomes. Applications must be submitted by August 10, 2012.

396. Starting Well: Benchmarking Early Education Across the World

Source: Economist Intelligence Unit - Retrieved July 13, 2012

The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), commissioned by the Lien Foundation, has issued a new report, Starting Well: Benchmarking Early Education Across the World (2012). The report looks at the extent to which 45 countries provide a good preschool environment for children between the ages of three and six, specifically considering the relative availability, affordability and quality of preschool. Some of the key findings show that Finland, Sweden and Norway perform best, while many high-income countries rank poorly (including the U.S, which ranked 24th). The lower ranking for the U.S. is not because quality preschool programs are lacking, but because they are not available or affordable to all strands of society and quality standards vary widely from one area of the country to another.

397. National Center for Special Education Research Announces FY 2012 Awards

Source: National Center for Special Education Research - July 9, 2012

The National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) recently made a total of 21 awards to applications considered under two FY 2012 (Session 2) competitions: Special Education Research Grants Program (CFDA 84.324A) and Special Education Research and Development Centers (CFDA 84.324C). Some of the awards related to early interventon and early childhood special education include:

398. An Integrated Approach to Supporting Child Development

Source: PolicyLab at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Retrieved July 3, 2012

PolicyLab at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has published a new Evidence to Action brief, SERIES: An Integrated Approach to Supporting Child Development (Summer 2012), which discusses the need to promote a more coordinated approach to ensuring that children with identified developmental needs are linked to appropriate services. The brief proposes the adoption of the SERIES paradigm of developmental screening, in which each step - Screening, Early identification, Referral, Intake, Evaluation, and Services - is viewed not as an isolated activity, but rather as an integral component of a single process.

399. New Video - Executive Function: Skills for Life and Learning

Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University - June 26, 2012

Executive functioning skills help us to focus on multiple streams of information at the same time and revise plans as necessary. Acquiring the early building blocks of these skills is an important and challenging task in early childhood. A new 5-minute video, Executive Function: Skills for Life and Learning (2012), looks at how these skills develop, what can disrupt their development, and how supporting them pays off in school and life. The video provides an overview of Building the Brain's "Air Traffic Control" System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function (2011), the joint Working Paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and the National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs.

400. Frameworks for RTI in Early Childhood Education - Comments Requested

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children - June 28, 2012

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) is seeking input from the public on Frameworks for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood Education: Description and Implications. This new paper is being developed collaboratively by NAEYC, the Division for Early Childhood, and the National Head Start Association. There are considerable controversies and misconceptions about the use of RTI in early childhood education and the associations' intent is for this paper to serve as a resource that will inform the conversations regarding RTI in ECE, addressing the controversies and misconceptions. Please submit comments and feedback by July 12, 2012.

401. Medicaid Financing of Early Childhood Home Visiting Programs

Source: Pew Charitable Trusts and the National Academy for State Health Policy - Retrieved June 28, 2012

The Pew Charitable Trusts and the National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) have published a new report, Medicaid Financing of Early Childhood Home Visiting Programs: Options, Opportunities, and Challenges (June 2012), which looks at how states are using, or could use, Medicaid to finance home visiting services. The report and its recommendations are based on a literature review and a scan of state policies and practices nationwide to identify mechanisms for supporting home visiting services through Medicaid, as well as input from an expert meeting at which state and federal government representatives and national home visiting experts discussed the benefits and challenges of different Medicaid funding mechanisms.

402. Proposed Requirements for Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge: Phase 2 - Invitation to Comment

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - June 20, 2012

On June 20, 2012, the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services published an invitation to comment on Proposed Requirements-Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge: Phase 2. In this phase of the RTT-ELC competition, they propose to make awards to certain States that applied for, but did not receive, funding under Phase 1, which was held in fiscal year (FY) 2011. Specifically, they would consider eligible the five highest-scoring applicants that did not receive funding in the FY 2011 RTT-ELC competition. Comments must be received on or before July 20, 2012. A PDF version of the Federal Register Notice is also available.

403. For Young Children with Autism, Directing Attention Boosts Language

Source: National Institutes of Health - June 21, 2012

Recent findings from a study supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) showed that an intervention in which adults actively engaged the attention of preschool children with autism by pointing to toys and using other gestures to focus their attention resulted in a long term increase in language skills. See the NIH news release for a summary of the findings.

Full citation: Kasari, C., Gulsrud, A., Freeman, S., Paparella, T. & Hellemann, G. (2012, May). Longitudinal follow-up of children with autism receiving targeted interventions on joint attention and play. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 51, (5), 487-495.

404. New Issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice Journal Available Online

Source: Early Childhood Research & Practice Journal - June 22, 2012

The Spring 2012 issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice (ECRP) is now available online. ECRP is an open-access, peer-reviewed, bilingual Internet journal in early care and education. Go to the Table of Contents for this issue's articles. ECRP is sponsored by the Early Childhood and Parenting (ECAP) Collaborative at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

405. Grant Notice - Models Promoting Young Children's Use of Assistive Technology

Source: U.S. Department of Education - June 4, 2012

The U.S. Department of Education published the following notice in the Federal Register on June 4, 2012: Notice Inviting Applications for Technology and Media Services for Individuals with Disabilities - Models Promoting Young Children's Use of Assistive Technology (CFDA No. 84.327L). Applications are due on July 19, 2012.

406. Two Datasets and Users Guides Added to PreK-3rd Data Resource Center Collection

Source: PreK-3rd Data Resource Center - June 7, 2012

The PreK-3rd Data Resource Center at the University of Michigan Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) has added two new datasets to their collection of longitudinal datasets and user guides, which are selected for their potential to inform PreK- 3rd policy and practice. The newly added datasets include:

  • The Head Start Impact Study (HSIS), 2002-2006, which tracks the impact of Head Start on children and families during the children's PreKindergarten, Kindergarten, and First Grade years; and
  • The Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS), which follows the achievement of students with disabilities (physical, mental, emotional) in PreKindergarten, Kindergarten, and elementary school and the factors associated with achievement.

407. FPG Snapshot - Culture and Parenting: Family Models Are Not One-Size-Fits-All

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - May 29, 2012

A recent study by the FPG Child Development Institute examined the utility of two family process models for families with young children from five different cultural groups. Family process models guide theories and research about family functioning and child development outcomes. A new FPG Snapshot, Culture and Parenting: Family Models Are Not One-Size-Fits-All (May 2012) provides a summary of findings from the study and explains why family process models are not one-size-fits-all.

Full article citation: Iruka, I.U., LaForett, D.R., & Odom, E.C. (2012). Examining the validity of the family investment and stress models and relationship to children's school readiness across five cultural groups. Journal of Family Psychology, 13(10):1-12. doi:10,1037/a0028290

408. CDC Lowers Lead-Poisoning Threshold for Kids

Source: HealthDay, U.S. National Library of Medicine - May 16, 2012

On May 16, 2012, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lowered the threshold for what's considered lead poisoning in young children from 10 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood to 5 micrograms, marking the first time in 20 years that the acceptable level of lead in the bloodstream has been reduced. The change means that many more children could be diagnosed with lead poisoning (the current number is 250,000), a condition that has been linked to developmental delays and a lower IQ. To learn more, see the announcement from HealthDay, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine - CDC Lowers Lead-Poisoning Threshold for Kids (May 16, 2012). See also, an announcement from the American Academy of Pediatrics commending the CDC for its action.

409. Preschool and School Readiness: Experiences of Children with Non-English-Speaking Parents

Source: Public Policy Institute of California - May 17, 2012

The Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) has published a new report, Preschool and School Readiness Experiences of Children with Non-English-Speaking Parents by Jill S. Cannon, Alison Jacknowitz, and Lynn A. Karoly (May 2012), which shows that linguistically isolated children (children living in households without any adult English speaker) who participate in center-based care in the U.S. the year before they enter kindergarten significantly improve their early reading skills compared to those who do not participate; however the gains are similar to those of children of U.S. natives, so the readiness gap between the two groups does not appreciably change. The authors suggest that more targeted programs may be needed to close school readiness gaps between linguistically isolated children and children of non-immigrant parents. See also, a related blog post from CLASP, English Language Learners Benefit from Preschool.

410. U.S. Department of Education Launches Office of Early Learning Web Site

Source: U.S. Department of Education - May 3, 2012

The U.S. Department of Education has launched an Office of Early Learning (OEL) Web site. The OEL is the new office charged with supporting the Department's Early Learning Initiative and works collaboratively with other Department offices to help coordinate and align early learning programs and initiatives. Additionally, OEL works across Federal Agencies, including co-administering the Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge grants with the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

411. Invitation to Comment - National IDEA TA Center on Early Childhood Longitudinal Data Systems

Source: U.S. Department of Education - May 4, 2012

Today the U.S. Department of Education posted a notice inviting comments on the following: Proposed Priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection, Analysis, and Reporting-National IDEA Technical Assistance Center on Early Childhood Longitudinal Data Systems (CFDA Number 84.373Z). The purpose of new TA center would be to build States' capacity to report high-quality data to meet IDEA reporting requirements. The TA center would assist States in developing statewide longitudinal data systems that include child-level data for infants, toddlers, and young children with disabilities served under IDEA Part C and Part B preschool programs. These data systems would be part of a coordinated early learning data system that vertically and horizontally links child, program, and workforce data elements. Comments must be submitted by July 18, 2012.

412. New Factsheets on Child Care and Development Block Grant Participation in 2010

Source: CLASP - May 3, 2012

CLASP has published the following three new factsheets to provide a snapshot of the 1.7 million children who received child care assistance through the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) in 2010.

Nationally, 30% of children served by CCDBG in 2010 were under age 3, 37% were ages 3 to 5, and 33% were ages 6 to 13. State-specific information on CCDBG participation is also available via CLASP's State Child Care Assistance Factsheets or by creating custom tables using CLASP's DataFinder tool.

413. Paid Family Leave: Strengthening Families and Our Future

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - Retrieved April 20, 2012

The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has published a new brief, Paid Family Leave: Strengthening Families and Our Future (April 2012), by Curtis Skinner and Susan Ochshorn. The brief looks at the effects of maternal employment and parental leave policies on child health, child cognitive and emotional development, maternal health, and the health of parental relationships. The authors present a set of research-based recommendations to advance policy for paid family leave.

414. New OSEP Policy Letters Now Available Online

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs - April 10, 2012

The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) recently posted its Fourth Quarter 2011 Policy Letters (dated October 1, 2011 - December 31, 2011) online. A letter of clarification dated April 4, 2012 on maintenance of effort has also been posted. These letters address issues related to the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). A Federal Register Notice published on March 23, 2012 includes brief summaries of the quarterly letters.

A subset of OSEP policy letters related to the early childhood provisions of the IDEA (Part C and Part B, Section 619) can be accessed on the NECTAC Web site.

415. FPG Snapshot Summarizes Findings from Landmark Abecedarian Study

Source: Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute - April 12, 2012

A new FPG Snapshot summarizes the findings from follow-up data on the Abecedarian project indicating life-enduring benefits at age 30 for those participating in the high quality early child care intervention project as infant/toddlers/preschoolers. See The Abecedarian Project: High-Quality Early Child Care Has Long-Lasting Effects (April 12, 2012).

416. State Personnel Development Grants - Proposed Priorities and Definitions

Source: U.S. Department of Education - April 13, 2012

On April 13, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services posted Proposed Priorities and Definitions under the State Personnel Development Grants (SPDG) Program in the Federal Register. These priorities and definitions may be used for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2012 and later years. Comments from the public must be received by May 14, 2012.

417. New Findings Link Maternal Obesity, Diabetes with Autism and Other Developmental Disorders

Source: Pediatrics - April 9, 2012

New research findings published online in Pediatrics on April 9, 2012 show a strong association between maternal diabetes and obesity during pregnancy and autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delays. Mothers who were obese were 1.6 times more likely to have a child with autism and more than twice as likely to have a child with another developmental disorder. Mothers with diabetes were 2.3 times more likely to have a child with developmental delays. An abstract of the article, Maternal Metabolic Conditions and Risk for Autism and Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders, is available online.

418. Video - Starting Life Without a Home

Source: ZERO TO THREE - April 2, 2012

ZERO TO THREE has produced a 7:34 minute video with highlights from a recent Congressional briefing on supporting homeless infants and toddlers. Starting Life Without a Home (2012) describes the negative effects of family homelessness on the developmental needs of young children and provides examples of successful intervention programs.

419. Recorded Webinar on the Use of Assistive Technology in Early Intervention

Source: Association of University Centers on Disabilities - April 4, 2012

A 60 minute webinar, The Use of Assistive Technology in Early Intervention, presented by Philippa H. Campbell on March 27, 2012, is now available online. The webinar provides information about how Assistive Technology (AT) is used with infants and toddlers in early intervention and includes information on resources that are available to help providers or caregivers increase children's learning and participation. It was hosted by the Early Intervention/ Early Childhood (EIEC) Special Interest Group of the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD).

420. Autism Prevalence in the United States Increases to 1 in 88 Children

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - March 30, 2012

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released new data on the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs), suggesting that 1 in 88 children in the U.S. has been identified with an ASD (1 in 54 for boys and 1 in 252 girls). The estimate is based on data collected during 2008. It marks a 23% increase since the previous report published in 2009 and a 78% increase since the first report published in 2007. The largest increases over time were among Hispanic children (110%) and black children (91%). The researchers suggest that some of this may be due to greater awareness and better identification among these groups; however this would only explain part of the increase. Read the full scientific article and the related community report.

On a related note, April is Autism Awareness Month. The Autism Society of America has free resources available to share with your community and is encouraging individuals to wear blue in support of individuals with ASD on Monday, April 2nd, which is International Autism Awareness Day.

421. Dual Language Learners in State Early Learning Guidelines and Standards

Source: Office of Head Start, National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness - March 30, 2012

The Office of Head Start's National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness has released a new resource, Dual Language Learners in State Early Learning Guidelines and Standards (March 2012). The resource includes an at-a-glance table that provides a snapshot of where DLLs are referenced in state and territory guidelines, standards, and supporting documents, as well as a table that includes portions of text referring to dual language learners from the guidelines and standards.

422. Our Youngest Children: Early Head Start Programs in 2010

Source: CLASP - March 28, 2012

CLASP has published a new analysis based on data from recent Head Start Program Information Reports (PIR). Supporting Our Youngest Children: Early Head Start Programs in 2010 (March 2012) describes the children and families served by Early Head Start (EHS) in 2010, EHS programs and staff in 2010, and trends from 2002 to 2010.

423. Blog Series: Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge Winners

Source: New America Foundation - March 30, 2012

The New America Foundation's Early Education Initiative has published a new report that combines their six-part Blog Series: Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge Winners (February-March 2012) into one document. It includes the following sections:

  • The 'Race to the Top' Winners: How States Plan to Use Quality Ratings Systems
  • The 'Race to the Top' Winners: Evaluating Quality Ratings Systems
  • The 'Race to the Top' Winners: How States Plan to Improve Early Learning Standards
  • The 'Race to the Top' Winners: How States Plan to Develop the Workforce
  • The 'Race to the Top' Winners: How States Plan to Assess Kindergarten Readiness
  • The 'Race to the Top' Winners: How States Plan to Include Early Grades

424. New Research Findings on the Readiness Gap Between Wealthy and Poor Children

Source: Brookings Institute and Stanford University - March 19, 2012

The Brookings Institute recently published a new report, Starting School at a Disadvantage: The School Readiness of Poor Children (March 2012) by Julia B. Isaacs, which shows that only 48% of poor children are ready for school at age five, compared to 75% of children from families with moderate and high income, a 27 percentage point gap. The paper discusses why poor children are less ready for school and evaluates three interventions that can improve their school readiness.

On a related note, new findings from a Stanford study show that the gap in test scores between wealthy and poor children has grown by about 40% since 1960 and is now nearly twice as large as the black-white achievement gap. The Stanford researcher who conducted the study suggests that early childhood interventions might be the best way to start bridging the gap.

425. Grant Notice - Preparation of Special Education, Early Intervention, and Related Services Leadership Personnel

Source: U.S. Education Department - March 22, 2012

On March 22, 2012, the U.S. Education Department published the following notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2012: Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities-Preparation of Special Education, Early Intervention, and Related Services Leadership Personnel (CFDA) Number: 84.325D. The Deadline for applications is May 7, 2012.

426. Updates from the Tots 'n Tech Research Institute

Source: Tots 'n Tech Research Institute - Retrieved March 15, 2012

The Tots 'n Tech Research Institute (TnT) has published its March 2012 Newsletter, which provides information on integrating iPad use into everyday activities and routines to promote the participation of all young children.

The Institute has also been updating its new Tots 'n Tech Helpdesk, which provides a wealth of current information about adaptations and assistive technology (AT) for infants and toddlers. It is designed to make it easy to find adaptations or AT solutions for everyday situations.

427. IES FY 2013 Competitions for Grants to Support Education and Special Education Research

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences - March 6, 2012

On March 6, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences (IES) published the following notice in the Federal Register: Applications for New Awards: Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs. The IES will conduct 10 competitions in FY 2013 through its National Center for Education Research (NCER) and its National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER). Some of the topics that will be considered include:

  • Early Intervention and Early Learning in Special Education
  • Early Learning Programs and Policies
  • Early Career Development and Mentoring in Special Education Research

The dates when applications will be available and the deadlines for transmittal of applications are shown in the chart at the end of the announcement. For more information, see the IES Web page on Funding Opportunities.

428. The Snap Vaccine: Boosting Children's Health

Source: Children's HealthWatch - March 5, 2012

Approximately 50% of children in the U.S. are expected to live in households that receive assistance through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly the Food Stamp Program) at some point in their childhood. Children's HealthWatch has published a new report, The Snap Vaccine: Boosting Children's Health (February 2012), which discusses the effects of SNAP on children's health and well-being. Research shows that children receiving SNAP are less likely to be underweight or at risk for developmental delays than children who are eligible but not receiving SNAP. The authors argue that SNAP is an effective vaccine for supporting the healthy minds and bodies of young children.

429. New Grant Notices from the U.S. Department of Education

Source: U.S. Department of Education - February 27, 2012

On February 27, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education published the following grant announcements in the Federal Register:

430. Early Ed Watch Podcast: Abecedarian Study Tracks Impact from Infancy to Age 30

Source: New America Foundation, Early Education Initiative - February 20, 2012

The New America Foundation's Early Education Initiative has posted a new podcast, Abecedarian Study Tracks Impact from Infancy to Age 30, featuring Craig Ramey, an internationally renowned scholar of early childhood research who created the Abecedarian Project in the 1970s. In the podcast, Ramey discusses findings related to the long-term outcomes for Abecedarian project participants at age 30. Ramey was one of the authors of a related article published on January 16, 2012 in the Developmental Psychology journal.

431. New Office of Child Care and Office of Head Start Web Sites Launched

Source: Office of Child Care and Office of Head Start - February 23, 2012

The Office of Child Care (OCC) and the Office of Head Start (OHS), both part of U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Children & Families (ACF), recently announced the launch of new Web sites. The new Office of Child Care Web site and the new Office of Head Start Web site will provide the latest OCC and OHS news, stories of those who have participated in Head Start, Early Head Start, and OCC programs, and links to the latest research findings, as well as additional resources.

432. Latest Issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education Now Available Online

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - Retrieved February 24, 2012

The International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is an online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. The full-text of the December 2011 issue is now available online free of charge.

433. Promote Access to Early, Regular and Comprehensive Screenings

Source: CLASP - February 15, 2012

CLASP has released a new resource that highlights research supporting the importance of early and regular health, mental health, and developmental screening for infants and toddlers. It includes policy recommendations to help states improve their screening rates. Promote Access to Early, Regular and Comprehensive Screenings (February 2012) is part of the "Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care" project at CLASP.

434. WWC Quick Review - School-Based Early Childhood Education and Age-28 Well-Being

Source: What Works Clearinghouse, Institute of Education Sciences - February 7, 2012

The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) recently released a new WWC Quick Review on School-Based Early Childhood Education and Age-28 Well-Being, a report that examined the effects of the Chicago Child-Parent Center Education Program on the educational attainment of participants at age 28. The study found that on average participants completed more schooling and were more likely to complete high school, graduate on time, and attend a four-year college than comparison group members. The research meets WWC evidence standards with reservations.

Citation for the full report:
Reynolds, A. J., Temple, J. A., Ou, S.-R., Arteaga, I. A., & White, B. A. B. (2011). School-based early childhood education and age-28 well-being: Effects by timing, dosage, and subgroups. Science Express. DOI:10.1126/science.1203618

435. New Concept Paper on Response to Intervention (RTI) in Early Childhood

Source: National Professional Development Center on Inclusion - January 31, 2012

The National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPDCI) has published a new concept paper, Response to Intervention (RTI) in Early Childhood: Building Consensus on the Defining Features (January 2012), which provides a framework for thinking about the meaning of RTI in early childhood and outlines important considerations for early care and education programs that choose to adopt and implement RTI. It was developed with input from national experts and key stakeholders gathered over a two-year period (2009-2011). Additional information and resources are available on NPDCI's Response to Intervention in Early Childhood (RTI-EC) Webpage.

436. Coaching and Quality Assistance in Quality Rating Improvement Systems

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - February 2, 2012

Improving the Odds for Young Children (ITO) at the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has released a new report, Coaching and Quality Assistance in Quality Rating Improvement Systems: Approaches Used by TA Providers to Improve Quality in Early Care and Education Programs and Home-based Settings (2012). This report presents findings from an interview study that investigated features of the professional development and on-site technical assistance available to center-based staff and home-based providers who participate in states' Quality Rating Improvement Systems.

437. New Get Ready to Read! Website

Source: National Center for Learning Disabilities - January 31. 2012

Get Ready to Read! has launched a new Website with updated content, and streamlined navigation. The new Get Ready to Read! Website is organized by the following sections:

  • Screening Tools - Includes the Get Ready to Read! screening tool and the new Early Learning Observation Rating Scale (ELORS)
  • Transition to Kindergarten Toolkit - Includes practical and easy-to-use materials to enhance children's transition to kindergarten
  • Skill-Building Activities - Includes activities and games to support developing literacy skills
  • Early Learning and Childhood Basics - Includes a collection of expert-written articles and other resources on early childhood development, reading, and math

Get Ready to Read! is an initiative of the National Center for Learning Disabilities.

438. Starting Strong III: A Quality Toolbox for Early Childhood Education and Care

Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development - Retrieved January 27, 2012

This week, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) released a new publication, Starting Strong III: A Quality Toolbox for Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) (2012). The Quality Toolbox looks at what defines quality and describes five policy levers that can enhance quality in ECEC. The online version includes a web page with examples of approaches used by governments to improve ECEC within their country, as well as links to websites, reports, frameworks, guides, training videos, and brochures that have been categorized by the five levers of the toolbox.

The OECD, a collaborative organization with 34 member nations, aims to provide a forum for governments to share experiences and seek solutions to common problems.

439. New Literacy Web Site! All Children Can Read

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness - January 26, 2012

The National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB) has created a new Web site, All Children Can Read, designed to provide information and resources to state deaf-blind projects, teachers, family members and related service providers interested in beginning or enhancing literacy instruction for children who have combined vision and hearing loss and children with other complex learning challenges. It contains sections on Early Emergent Literacy and Emergent Literacy. NCDB is funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP).

440. Family Engagement in Early Education: A Resource Guide for Early Learning Challenge Grant Recipients

Source: Harvard Family Research Project - January 18, 2012

The Harvard Family Research Project recently published resource guide on engaging and supporting families with young children to help support states that recently received Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTTT-ELC) grants, as well as other states, districts, and local programs interested in expanding their family engagement work. Family Engagement in Early Education: A Resource Guide for Early Learning Challenge Grant Recipients (2012) aligns with the three family engagement areas highlighted in the RTTT-ELC criteria and includes two additional areas that are important to programs' family engagement efforts.

441. 30 Year Follow-up Study Shows Benefits of High Quality Early Childhood Care and Education

Source: Developmental Psychology - January 16, 2012

On January 16, 2012, Developmental Psychology published new findings from the long-running, highly regarded Abecedarian Project, led by the FPG Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The findings show that adults who participated in the high quality early childhood education program in the 1970s are still benefitting in a variety of ways. For example, at age 30, Abecedarian Project participants had significantly more years of education than the control group and were four times more likely to have earned college degrees (23% of participants compared to only 6% of the control group). See the UNC News Release for a summary of additional findings.

Full citation: Campbell, F. A., Pungello, E. P., Burchinal, M., Kainz, K., Pan, Y., Wasik, B. H., Barbarin, O. A., Sparling, J. J., & Ramey, C.T. (2012). Adult outcomes as a function of an early childhood educational program: An Abecedarian Project follow-up. Developmental Psychology, Jan 16, 2012. doi: 10.1037/a0026644

Online access may require subscription, or you can purchase the article without subscription.

You may also be interested in NECTAC's resource page on Effectiveness of Infant and Early Childhood Interventions.

442. PowerPoint Presentation on Early Childhood and AT

Source: Family Center on Technology and Disability - Retrieved January 20, 2012

The Family Center on Technology and Disability (FCTD) recently posted a new PowerPoint presentation on their Web site entitled Early Childhood and AT. The presentation provides a range of assistive technology (AT) examples appropriate for young children and discusses issues to be considered when using AT with this age group.

Permission to copy and distribute portions of the Power Point without prior consent is provided, as long as attribution is given to the FCTD, under U.S. Department of Education Grant H327F080003. The FCTD also has additional PowerPoint Presentations on Assistive Technology available on their Web site.

443. How Early Learning Challenge Grant Recipients are Targeting Infants & Toddlers

Source: ZERO TO THREE - January 10, 2012

ZERO TO THREE recently published a snapshot that looks at the plans of the nine states that received four-year Early Learning Challenge (ELC) grants and highlights those state proposals that are specifically targeted to positively impact infants and toddlers. How Early Learning Challenge Grant Recipients are Targeting Infants & Toddlers (2011) is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/public-policy/elc-it-article-for-baby-monitor.pdf

444. New Head Start And Early Head Start Fact Sheets

Source: CLASP - Retrieved January 6, 2011

Based on Head Start Program Information Report (PIR) data from 2010, CLASP recently released two new fact sheets providing a look at the Head Start preschool and Early Head Start programs in the 2009-2010 program year. The fact sheets look at the characteristics of children and their families, as well as the programs children attended and their staff.

445. The Early Childhood Care and Education Workforce: Challenges and Opportunities

Source: National Academies Press - January 6, 2012

In March 2011, the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council held a workshop on the Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) workforce. The goal was to: 1) define and describe the nature of the current ECCE workforce; 2) examine the characteristics of the workforce that affect the development of children; and 3) describe the context of the workforce and how to build the ECCE profession in ways that promote program quality and effective child outcomes, while supporting providers. A prepublication copy of the workshop's report is now available online from the National Academies Press at http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13238

446. New Issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice Journal Available Online

Source: Early Childhood Research & Practice Journal - Retrieved December 29, 2011

The Fall 2011 issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice (ECRP) is now available online. ECRP is an open-access, peer-reviewed, bilingual Internet journal in early care and education. The current issue features special sections on "Working with Families of Young Children" and "Professional Development of Early Childhood Educators." It also includes a paper on child care quality in relation to teacher characteristics and subsidy status, and an article about one state's approach to assessing children's skills at kindergarten entry. It is available full-text online at http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v13n2/index.html

447. Improving School Readiness and Success for Children

Source: SEDL's Southeast Comprehensive Center - December 13, 2011

A recent article by SEDL's Southeast Comprehensive Center reviews the significance of school readiness and factors that help young learners prepare for school. School readiness consists of three components: (1) a child's readiness for school, (2) schools' readiness to support the learning and development of every child, and (3) family and community supports and services that contribute to children's readiness. School readiness also requires high-quality preschool and readiness programs, professional development for the early childhood workforce, alignment of early learning guidelines and standards with content standards, coordinated early childhood data systems, and other efforts targeted to address the needs of young children and their families. To read the entire article, go to http://secc.sedl.org/resources/newsletter/ebulletin/eBulletinv5n3.html#improve

448. Final Amendments to FERPA Regulations Released

Source: U.S. Department of Education - December 2, 2011

On December 2, 2011, the U.S. Department of Education published the final amendments to the regulations for implementing the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) in the Federal Register. FERPA is meant to protect the privacy of education records while allowing for the effective use of data. The Federal Register notice can be accessed at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/12/02/2011-30683/family-educational-rights-and-privacy

449. Announcing the New Tots 'n Tech Website and Help Desk Resource

Source: Tots 'n Tech Research Institute - November 30, 2011

The Tots 'n Tech Research Institute (TnT) recently launched a new Website that includes a wealth of up-to-date information about adaptations and assistive technology (AT) for infants and toddlers. The Web site features a new Help Desk resource, which is designed to make it easy to find adaptations or AT solutions for everyday situations. Information is presented through various media and can be searched by starting with a functional skill, such as communication/socialization or getting around. The new Help Desk will continually be updated and TnT would appreciate your input.

450. Research Synthesis Points on Quality Inclusive Practices

Source: National Professional Development Center on Inclusion - November 30, 2011

The National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPDCI) recently published Research Synthesis Points on Quality Inclusive Practices (2011), which provides brief descriptions and supporting references for evidence-based and promising practices that support early childhood inclusion. It is organized into three major sections corresponding to the defining features of high quality early childhood inclusion as described in the Joint Position Statement on Early Childhood Inclusion of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). The synthesis can be accessed online at http://www.fpg.unc.edu/news/highlight_detail.cfm?ID=971

451. Supporting Child Development through Family-Provider Relationships

Source: Child Trends - Retrieved December 2, 2011

Child Trends recently announced the release of the following briefs on supporting child development through family-provider relationships. The briefs were funded through a contract with the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

452. Overview and Discussion of 2011 Part C Regulations: Information, Implementation and Implications

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs - November 16, 2011

On November 16, 2011 the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) held a training session on the new regulations for implementing Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Materials from the session are now available online at http://osep-part-c.tadnet.org/materials, including:

The accompanying Webcast will be posted on 11/21/2011.

453. Online Forum on Implementing RTI in Early Childhood Settings: National, State, and Program Perspectives

Source: RTI Action Network - November 17, 2011

On November 17, 2011 the RTI Action Network dbuted a new RTI National Online Forum, Implementing Response to Intervention in Early Childhood Settings: National, State, and Program Perspectives. The 80-minute webcast features four nationally recognized experts in RTI who provide guidance on establishing multi-tiered systems of support for young children, an overview of the essential components of RTI, new instructional strategies, policy considerations, emerging approaches to measurement, and the supports needed for success. It is available at http://www.rtinetwork.org/professional/forums-and-webinars/forums/rti-national-online-forum-implementing-response-to-intervention-in-early-childhood-settings

454. New Final Rule Amends Head Start Program Regulations

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - November 9, 2011

A new final rule amending Head Start Program regulations was published in the Federal Register on November 9, 2011. For the first time, this rule requires Head Start grantees that fail to meet a new set of rigorous benchmarks to re-compete for continued federal funding. Over the next three years, all 1,600 grantees will be evaluated on benchmarks including health standards, integrity, and classroom quality. The new rule will be effective on December 9, 2011. It is available at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/11/09/2011-28880/head-start-program

To read the White House news release, go to http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/11/08/we-cant-wait-president-obama-takes-action-improve-quality-and-promote-ac
To see a video of President Obama's comments when introducing the new rule, go to http://www.whitehouse.gov/photos-and-video/video/2011/11/08/president-obama-speaks-holding-head-start-programs-accountable

455. Starting Out Right: Pre-K and Kindergarten

Source: Center for Public Education - November 1, 2011

The Center for Public Education has published a new report Starting Out Right: Pre-K and Kindergarten (November 2011), which looks at the effect of various combinations of pre-k and kindergarten on third grade reading skills, a key predictor of future academic success. Findings show that children who attend pre-k and half-day kindergarten are more likely to have higher reading skills by the third grade than those who attend full-day kindergarten alone. The impact was greatest for Hispanic children, black children, English Language Learners and children from low-income families. The report is available at http://www.centerforpubliceducation.org/Main-Menu/Organizing-a-school/Starting-Out-Right-Pre-K-and-Kindergarten

456. Pediatric Medical Homes: Laying the Foundation of a Promising Model of Care

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - Retrieved October 27, 2011

Project Thrive at the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has published a new report that discusses the current status of the medical home concept, the number and characteristics of children served by medical homes, and opportunities to further leverage medical homes to achieve better health outcomes for young children, with a particular focus on the coordination of care for vulnerable children. Pediatric Medical Homes: Laying the Foundation of a Promising Model of Care (October 2011), by Andrea Bachrach, Elizabeth A. Isakson, David Seith, and Christel Brellochs, is available online at http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_1041.html

457. Webcast: What's Missing in Child Care and Early Education in America?

Source: New America Foundation, Early Education Initiative - October 25, 2011

Last week, the New America Foundation hosted an event called What's Missing in Child Care and Early Education in America? A Webcast of the event, featuring the following speakers, is now available online at http://newamerica.net/events/2011/child_care

  • Joan Lombardi - Former Deputy Assistant Secretary and Inter-Departmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development, Administration for Children and Families U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • Barbara Gault - Executive Director and Vice President, Institute for Women's Policy Research
  • Eric Karolak - Executive Director, Early Care and Education Consortium
  • Danielle Ewen - Director of Child Care and Early Education, CLASP

458. ZERO TO THREE Releases Application for State Policy Action Team Meeting

Source: ZERO TO THREE - October 24, 2011

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center, supported by the Birth to Five Policy Alliance, is soliciting applications for participation in a state policy action team meeting designed to support states and territories with the intentional integration of quality home visiting services in their early childhood systems. Five states/territories will be selected to send teams of 4-5 people to attend the meeting, which will be held in April or May 2012. Interested states and territories must submit a single application by November 22, 2011. For more information about the meeting and the application process download the request for applications at http://main.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/RFA.pdf?docID=12801&JServSessionIda004=dk7xejcyn1.app212c

459. Research Findings - Preschoolers' Classmates Influence Their Language Skills

Source: e! Science News - October 26, 2011

A recent article in e! Science News (10/26/11) discusses findings from a new study, which suggest that preschool students affect one another's language development and relatively less-skilled students seem to be more affected than highly skilled students. The authors question the practice seen in many publicly-funded programs of placing disadvantaged children with relatively low skill levels with similarly performing peers. To learn more, go to http://esciencenews.com/articles/2011/10/26/preschoolers.classmates.influence.their.language.skills

460. Proposed Changes to the Part B SPP/APR - Invitation to Comment

Source: Department of Education - October 17, 2011

On October 17, 2011, the Department of Education published an invitation to comment on proposed changes to the IDEA Part B State Performance Plan (SPP) and Annual Performance Report (APR). Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before December 16, 2011. To see the Federal Register notice, go to https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/10/17/2011-26814/notice-of-proposed-information-collection-requests

Copies of the proposed information collection request may be accessed from http://edicsweb.ed.gov, by selecting the "Browse Pending Collections" link and by clicking on link number 4736. When you access the information collection, click on "Download Attachments" to view.

461. Grant Invitation - Improving Cultural and Linguistic Competence in Quality Rating and Improvement Systems

Source: QRIS National Learning Network and the BUILD Initiative - October 17, 2011

The QRIS National Learning Network and the BUILD Initiative invite states that have or are developing a quality rating and improvement system (QRIS) to apply for a technical assistance (TA) grant that focuses on building greater cultural and linguistic competence in a QRIS. TA will be customized to participating state needs and, depending upon specific interests and needs, could potentially encompass a broad range of issues related to building greater cultural and linguistic competence in your QRIS. Applications are due October 28, 2011. To learn more and access the application, go to http://library.constantcontact.com/download/get/file/1102634765558-36/TechnicalAssistanceApplicationPDFVersion.pdf

462. Part C Implementation: State Challenges and Responses - Survey Results Published

Source: IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association - October 7, 2011

The IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association (ITCA) has published the results of its 2011 Tipping Points Survey, which is used to help track emerging issues and state responses related to eligibility, finance and state decisions regarding continued participation in the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA). Fifty states and three jurisdictions completed the survey. ITCA draws no conclusions from the data analysis and all information is aggregated, to ensure that the individual state responses are confidential. The report is available online at http://www.ideainfanttoddler.org/pdf/2011_State_Challenges.pdf

463. Recently Released - National Assessment of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

Source: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance - Retrieved October 7, 2011

The National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, a program of the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences, recently published a report entitled National Assessment of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (2011). The report discusses the effectiveness of the IDEA in achieving its purposes in several key areas, including:

  • Providing Services to Young Children
  • Identification of Students Needing Special Education
  • Efforts to Promote Positive Educational Outcomes for Children and Youth with Disabilities
  • Promoting Parent Participation
  • Implementing Dispute Resolution Procedures

It is available online at http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/pubs/20114026/index.asp

464. Final Part C Regulations and Video Highlighting Major Changes Now Available

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services - September 28, 2011

The Final Part C Regulations governing the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities were published in the Federal Register on September 28, 2011. These regulations are effective on October 28, 2011.

A 20 minute video from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) highlighting major changes to the regulations is also available online at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4dwwRIumSA

For additional information about the new Part C regulations and upcoming training opportunities, go to the IDEA Part C Web site at http://idea.ed.gov/part-c/search/new

465. Grant Notice - Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems (SLDS)

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics - September 20, 2011

On September 20, 2011, the National Center for Education Statistics at the U.S. Department of Education's Institute for Education Sciences published an invitation in the Federal Register for state educational agencies to apply for grants to help develop and implement statewide, longitudinal data systems. Applicants may apply for funds to carry out projects to address one of the following three priorities:

  1. to design, develop, and implement a statewide, longitudinal kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12) data system;
  2. to develop and link early childhood data with the state's K-12 data system; or
  3. to develop and link postsecondary and/or workforce data with the state's K-12 data system.

The submission deadline is December 15, 2011. State educational agencies that received Statewide, Longitudinal Data System grants under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 are not eligible to apply for grants under this competition.

The Federal Register notice is available at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/09/20/2011-24151/applications-for-new-awards-statewide-longitudinal-data-systems-program
Additional information is also available at http://nces.ed.gov/Programs/SLDS/fy12_rfa.asp

466. Hidden Violence: Protecting Young Children at Home

Source: Bernard van Leer Foundation - Retrieved September 2, 2011

Early Childhood Matters, a biannual journal published by the Bernard van Leer Foundation, recently published an article by Jack P. Shonkoff and Nathan Fox, which discusses stressful circumstances that can disrupt the developing architecture of the brain. The authors emphasize the importance of policies and programs that take into account the developmental needs of children living under these kinds of circumstances. The full text of the article, Hidden violence: Protecting young children at home (2011), is available free of charge on the Bernard van Leer Foundation Web site at http://bernardvanleer.org/Hidden-violence-Protecting-young-children-at-home?pubnr=1365&download=1

To learn more about publications related to early childhood that are available free of charge from the Bernard van Leer Foundation, go to http://www.bernardvanleer.org/English/Home/Publications.html

467. Preschool Education: Delivering on the Promise for Latino Children

Source: National Council of La Raza - Retrieved September 2, 2011

The National Council of La Raza (NCLR) has published a new research report that looks at barriers to quality and access that limit the participation of Latino children and families in preschool and offers recommendations for state and federal policymakers on how to design a high-quality preschool education system that serves all children, including Latinos and English language learners (ELLs). Preschool Education: Delivering on the Promise for Latino Children (2011) is available full-text online at http://www.nclr.org/images/uploads/publications/Preschool_Education.pdf

468. 1st 2011 Issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education Available

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - Retrieved September 2, 2011

The International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is an online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. The full-text of the June 2011 issue is now available free of charge online at http://www.int-jecse.net/V3N1.htm

469. Final Application For Race To The Top-Early Learning Challenge Released

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - August 23, 2011

On August 23, 2011, the Obama administration released the final application for the Race To The Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC), which will provide $500 million in state-level competitive grants to improve early learning and development programs. The goal of the RTT-ELC is to better prepare more children with high needs for kindergarten. Grant awards will range from around $50 to $100 million, depending on state population and proposed plans. Applications are due on October 19, 2011. The Departments of Education and Health and Human Services will announce winners in December, 2011.

470. New Report Evaluates States' Spending on Home Visiting Programs

Source: Pew Center on the States' Home Visiting Campaign - August 24, 2011

On August 24, 2011, the Pew Center on the States' Home Visiting Campaign released a 50-state report on funding for voluntary home visiting programs. States and the New Federal Home Visiting Program: An Assessment from the Starting Line (August 2011) looks at the extent to which each state is supporting evidence-based program models and how well each is tracking whether public expenditures are resulting in improved outcomes. The report also provides a roadmap for policy makers interested in making strategic investments in programs that help strengthen families. To learn more and to access the full report, go to http://www.pewstates.org/research/data-visualizations/home-visiting-inventory-interactive-85899372712

471. Video of Panel Discussion on Early Childhood Education Reform

Source: Brookings Institution - Retrieved August 24, 2011

On August 22, 2011, the Brookings Institution hosted a panel discussion on early education, centered around an article by Dr. Steven Barnett published in the August 19, 2011 issue of Science journal, entitled Effectiveness of Early Educational Intervention. The event included a discussion with the head of the national Head Start Association and other early education experts. Dr. Barnett gave the keynote address. To view a video of the event, go to http://www.c-span.org/Events/Benefits-of-Early-Education-Debated/10737423641-1/

472. New Free Videos from the Results Matter Video Project

Source: Results Matter Video Project - August 16, 2011

The Results Matter Video Project has added two new sections and posted more than 30 new videos to their free Video Library. You can watch the clips online or download them for use in activities such as professional development, team meetings, observation practice, and parent orientation. To learn more, go to http://www.cde.state.co.us/resultsmatter/RMVideoSeries.htm#top. Some highlights include:

  • Early Care and Education - Includes 10 videos in which teachers share stories and illustrate the ways in which they are using video in their work.
  • Early Intervention: There are 6 stories in this section. "Reflections During the Final Home Visit" is a favorite.
  • Clips for Practicing Observation, Documentation and Assessment Skills: Includes 48 clips of children participating in typical preschool routines and activities. They are meant to be used in professional development activities.
  • General Interest: In this section of 3 clips, you'll find an overview of "What is Authentic Assessment."
  • Using Technology for Authentic Assessment: Includes 3 new clips illustrating how teachers are using digital video, iPhones, and iPods to document children's learning and progress. There is also an illustration of sharing digital video with families in "Aurelius Reading at Naptime" and a tutorial, "Using MPEG Streamclip to Edit Video Files," which shows how to use a free application to edit and compress digital video files.
  • Practices Here and There: The videos in this new section highlight practices used by programs participating in the Results Matter Video Project, such as coaching, dialogic reading, and The Incredible Years.

473. Early Educator Competencies: New Concept Paper

Source: National Professional Center on Inclusion - August 19, 2011

The National Professional Center on Inclusion (NPDCI) has released a concept paper identifying issues and providing guidance to states as they develop early educator competencies in the context of inclusion. Key issues include ensuring competencies reflect emerging research on effective practices for working in inclusive settings with children with and without disabilities, as well as linking early educator competencies with quality professional development opportunities, accountability systems, and other components of a comprehensive early childhood system. Competencies for Early Childhood Educators in the Context of Inclusion: Guidance and Issues for States (2011) is available online at http://npdci.fpg.unc.edu/resources/articles/NPDCI-Competencies-8-2-2011

474. Influences of Family-Systems Intervention Practices on Parent-Child Interactions and Child Development

Source: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute - August 10, 2011

The Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute recently announced that Influences of Family-Systems Intervention Practices on Parent-Child Interactions and Child Development, by Drs. Carol M. Trivette, Carl J. Dunst and Deborah W. Hamby, was the most downloaded article published in Topics in Early Childhood Special Education in 2009-2010. To celebrate, Sage has made the article freely available to the public at http://tec.sagepub.com/content/30/1/3.full.pdf+html?ijkey=tmAzuxTTzKuhY&keytype=ref&siteid=sptec&utm_source=eNewsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=1J22

475. Parents' Decisions about Newborn Screening for Fragile X Syndrome

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - August 8, 2011

Findings from a pilot study on parents' reactions to an invitation for their newborns to be screened for Fragile X Syndrome were published in a recent issue of Pediatrics. A summary of the study, led by FPG Child Development Institute Senior Scientist, Debra Skinner, is now available in FPG Snapshot #63, Parents' Decisions about Newborn Screening for Fragile X Syndrome (August 2011), at http://projects.fpg.unc.edu/~snapshots/FPG-Snapshot-63.pdf .

Full article citation: Skinner, D., Choudhury, S., Sideris, J., Guarda, S., Buansi, A., Roche, M., Bailey, D. B., Jr. (2011). Parents' decisions to screen newborns for FMR1 gene expansions in a pilot research project. Pediatrics, 127, e1455-e1463.

For more information about the Fragile X Newborn Screening Study, go to http://projects.fpg.unc.edu/~fxnewborn/

476. State Performance Plan Process and Indicators: A Policy Forum

Source: Project Forum - Retrieved August 8, 2011

Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education has published the proceedings from a policy forum held May 11-13, 2011, to provide input to the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) about the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) accountability reporting system known as the State Performance Plan/ Annual Performance Report (SPP/APR) process. Participants discussed the benefits and challenges of the SPP/APR requirements and made recommendations for improvement. No attempt was made to develop consensus recommendations and all input was accepted and documented. State Performance Plan Process and Indicators: A Policy Forum (July 2011) is available online at http://projectforum.org/docs/StatePerformancePlanProcessandIndicators.pdf

477. EZ AT 2: Simple Assistive Technology Ideas for Children Ages Birth to Three

Source: PACER Center and Tots 'n Tech Research Institute - Retrieved July 22, 2011

The PACER Center, in collaboration with the Tots 'n Tech Research Institute, recently published EZ AT 2: Simple Assistive Technology Ideas for Children Ages Birth to Three (2011). EZ AT 2 is a guide for parents and professionals interested in helping infants and toddlers with disabilities participate more fully in daily routines and activities. It includes a collection of "Ideas to Share" from the Tots 'n Tech Research Institute, as well as easy-to-follow directions, a glossary, and a list of vendors where materials, supplies and AT can be easily located. It available online at http://www.pacer.org/stc/pubs/EZ-AT-book-2011-final.pdf

On a related note, the most recent newsletter from the Tots 'n Tech Research Institute examines the following topic: Can a Robot Really Be Considered "Assistive Technology" for Children? (June 2011). It is available at http://tnt.asu.edu/files/RobotsNewsletter(May)_final_6-8-2011.pdf

478. CDC Autism Fact Sheet Now Translated into Multiple Languages

Source: USC University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities - Retrieved July 15, 2011

The USC University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (USC UCEDD) has translated the "Learn the Signs. Act Early" Autism Fact Sheet from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) into multiple languages to reach underserved populations. The Autism Fact Sheet provides a one-page tool for clinicians to share with families to raise awareness about developmental delay, which may be related to autism or other developmental disabilities. It is now available in Arabic, Armenian, Farsi, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Tagalog, Thai, and Vietnamese at http://uscucedd.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=455&Itemid=426. It is available from CDC in Spanish and English at http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/actearly/downloads.html

479. Strategies for Building an Aligned System for Early Learning

Source: National Association of Elementary School Principals and the New America Foundation - Retrieved July 12, 2011

The National Association of Elementary School Principals' (NAESP) Foundation Task Force on Early Learning recently published a report that recommends 10 action steps to guide the work involved in aligning early childhood and elementary education. Building and Supporting an Aligned System: A Vision for Transforming Education Across the Pre-K-Grade Three Years (2011) is available at http://www.naesp.org/transforming-early-childhood-education-pre-k-grade-3

On a related note, Samuel J. Meisels, president of the Erikson Institute in Chicago, recently posted a comment on the New America Foundation's Early Ed Watch Blog that discusses the importance of creating a high-quality continuum of learning that supports children's growth and development from preschool through 3rd grade. It is available at http://earlyed.newamerica.net/blogposts/2011/guest_post_on_beyond_pre_k-54623

480. RTT-ELC Competition - Opportunity for Public Input Ends July 11th at 5:00 PM EDT

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - July 1, 2011

The U.S. Departments of Education (ED) and Health and Human Services (HHS) have announced an opportunity for the public to provide input on the draft requirements, priorities, selection criteria, and definitions for the Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) Program. The draft document is being posted for public input from July 1, 2011 until 5:00 PM EDT on July 11, 2011. All interested parties are invited to share their thoughts. The direct link to the public input site is http://www.ed.gov/early-learning/elc-draft-summary. The final RTT-ELC requirements, priorities, selection criteria, and definitions will be published in a Notice Inviting Applications in the Federal Register later this summer.

481. Special Journal Section on Social-Emotional Issues in Early Childhood Settings

Source: Early Childhood Research & Practice - Retrieved June 23, 2011

The Spring 2011 issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice (ECRP) is now available online. It contains a special section on Social-Emotional Issues in Early Childhood Settings. See http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v13n1/index.html. ECRP is a free online journal featuring articles related to the development, care, and education of children from birth to approximately age 8. It is published by the Clearinghouse on Early Education and Parenting (CEEP) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

482. Study on How Home Learning Environments Impact School Readiness

Source: ScienceDaily - Retrieved June 21, 2011

The June 21, 2011 issue of ScienceDaily includes findings from a study that looked at the home environments of more than 1,850 children from households at or below the federal poverty line. Results showed that factors such as levels of shared reading, exposure to frequent and varied adult speech, and access to children's books had an impact on school readiness skills. For example, children whose learning environments were consistently low in quality from ages 1-5 were much more likely to have delays in language and literacy skills than children whose environments were uniformly high at these ages. These results highlight the importance of the first years of a child's life and how interventions can make a difference. To learn more, see http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110620112108.htm

Journal Reference: Rodriguez, E. T., Tamis-LeMonda, C. S., (2011). Trajectories of the home learning environment across the first 5 years: Associations with children's vocabulary and literacy skills at prekindergarten. Child Development, Article first published online June 16, 2011, doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01614.x

483. New CLASP Papers on Child Care and Early Head Start

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - Retrieved June 15, 2011

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) recently published the following papers related to child care and Early Head Start:

  • Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care: Expand Monitoring and Technical Assistance (2011), by Teresa Lim and Hannah Matthews - http://www.clasp.org/babiesinchildcare/recommendations?id=0009 - This paper recommends that states conduct routine monitoring of infant and toddler child care in centers and family child care settings at least twice a year, provide technical assistance to help providers with licensing compliance, and use information on provider compliance to inform parents and ensure ongoing improvements in monitoring systems and child care quality.
  • What State Leaders Should Know About Early Head Start (2011), by Elizabeth Hoffmann and Danielle Ewen - http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/What-State-Leaders-Should-Know-About-EHS.pdf - This paper reviews 11 key aspects of how the Early Head Start (EHS) program works and provides considerations for state leaders. It is meant to serve as an introduction to the program for state policymakers, not to provide official guidance or interpretation of the laws and regulations governing EHS.

484. Investing in Innovation (i3): Notices Inviting Applications for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011

Source: U.S. Department of Education - Retrieved June 17, 2011

Recently, the U.S. Department of Education announced that $150 million will be available for the next round of Investing in Innovation (i3) grants to support evidence-based practices in education. Individual school districts, groups of districts, and nonprofits in partnership with districts or a consortium of schools are invited to apply. Applicants may receive additional points if they successfully address certain priorities, including innovations for improving early learning outcomes and innovations to address the unique learning needs of students with disabilities and limited English proficient students.

The Department will be hosting three pre-application workshops and webinars to support potential applicants for these grants. Applications are due on August 2, 2011. Application packages and information on the pre-application workshops, can be found at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/innovation/index.html

485. U.S. Senate Subcommittee Hearing on Quality Early Education and Care

Source: U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Children and Families - June 9, 2011

On Thursday, June 9, 2011, the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Children and Families held a hearing entitled Getting the Most Bang for the Buck: Quality Early Education and Care. Witnesses discussed the importance of having a comprehensive early education and care program in the nation. A video of the hearing is available online at http://www.help.senate.gov/hearings/hearing/?id=4fd57df5-5056-9502-5d58-05502741ee44

See also, an Early Ed Watch blog post about the hearing from the New America Foundation's Early Education Initiative - http://earlyed.newamerica.net/blogposts/2011/hearing_features_bi_partisan_call_for_more_focus_on_child_care_and_early_ed-52763

486. New Resources from the Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation

Source: Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation - Retrieved June 10, 2011

The Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation recently published the following new resources:

  • Tutorial: Recognizing and Supporting the Social and Emotional Health of Young Children Birth to Age 5
    http://www.ecmhc.org/tutorials/social-emotional/index.html
    This tutorial provides early childhood mental health consultants with a detailed understanding of the behaviors related to social and emotional health in infants and young children, as well as strategies that adults can use to support these behaviors within every day routines and settings.
  • Infant Toddler Temperament Tool
    http://www.ecmhc.org/temperament/index.html
    This tool helps parents and caregivers explore their own temperament traits, as well as those of a child for whom they provide care. Results support parents and caregivers in understanding how adult and child similarities and differences in temperament traits may affect "goodness of fit" and provide tips to foster the unique temperament of each child within their care.

487. Part C Eligibility Considerations for Infants and Toddlers Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Source: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management and the IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association - Retrieved May 17, 2011

A new document, Part C Eligibility Considerations for Infants and Toddlers who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (2011), is now available from the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM) and the IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association (ITCA). The purpose of this document is to provide information that will assist people responsible for state Part C systems in:

  • Making informed evidence-based decisions as they develop or review eligibility criteria related to infants and toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Determining the appropriate personnel to participate in eligibility determination and the development of an Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) to address service needs of the child and family.
  • Providing resource information to families of children who do not meet the eligibility criteria established by the state's Part C program.

It is available at http://www.infanthearing.org/earlyintervention/part_c_eligibility.pdf

488. Grant Notice: State Personnel Development Grants (SPDG) Program

Source: U.S. Education Department - May 20, 2011

On May 20, 2011, the U.S. Department of Education published the following grant Notice in the Federal Register: State Personnel Development Grants (SPDG) Program - (CFDA) Number: 84.323A. The purpose of this program, authorized by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), is to assist State Educational Agencies (SEAs) in reforming and improving their systems for personnel preparation and professional development in early intervention, educational, and transition services in order to improve results for children with disabilities. Applications must be received by July 5, 2011. To learn more, got o https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/05/20/2011-12471/applications-for-new-awards-state-personnel-development-grants-spdg-program

489. Research on the LEAP Model of Early Intervention for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: Institute of Education Sciences - May 18, 2011

The May 2011 newsletter from the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) highlights new research findings on the LEAP model of early intervention for young children with autism spectrum disorders. With funding from the National Center for Special Education Research, the developers of LEAP implemented a new experimental evaluation comparing full implementation to a reduced model based only on access to materials. They found that providing preschool teachers with LEAP training and mentoring resulted in greater fidelity of implementation and more positive child outcomes when compared to teachers who were only given the training manuals and materials. To read the full article, go to http://ies.ed.gov/whatsnew/newsletters/?index=roundncser

490. A Call to Action On Behalf of Maltreated Infants and Toddlers

Source: American Humane Association, Center for the Study of Social Policy, Child Welfare League of America, Children's Defense Fund, ZERO TO THREE - Retrieved May 12, 2011

A new document developed by the American Humane Association, the Center for the Study of Social Policy, the Child Welfare League of America, the Children's Defense Fund, and ZERO TO THREE presents the evidence on the importance of addressing the needs of infants and toddlers in the child welfare system, who are at high risk for developmental problems. It is intended to be a starting point for policymakers and administrators who are engaged in developing or revising policies that protect the development of infants and toddlers as well as their safety. A Call to Action On Behalf of Maltreated Infants and Toddlers (2011) is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/public-policy/federal-policy/childwelfareweb.pdf

491. Does Participation in Pre-primary Education Translate into Better Learning Outcomes at School?

Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development - Retrieved May 11, 2011

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's 2009 analysis of PISA, an international standardized assessment of 15 year olds in 65 countries, showed that in most OECD countries 15-year-olds who had attended some pre-primary school outperformed those who had not. After accounting for socio-economic background, students who had attended pre-primary school scored an average of 33 points higher than those who had not, a gain of approximately one additional year of schooling. However, in Estonia, Finland, Korea and the United States, attending pre-primary education was found to have little or no relationship to later PISA performance among students of similar backgrounds. The strongest findings were in countries that invest more per child and offer early learning programs to more children, over a longer period of time, with smaller pupil-to-teacher ratios. Does participation in pre-primary education translate into better learning outcomes at school? (2011) is available online at http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/37/0/47034256.pdf

492. QRIS and P-3: Creating Synergy Across Systems to Close Achievement Gaps and Improve Opportunities for Young Children

Source: BUILD Initiative - Retrieved May 13, 2011

A new policy brief from the BUILD Initiative discusses coordinating and aligning efforts around the implementation of Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) and preschool through third grade (P-3) programs to improve the quality of children's early experiences. QRIS and P-3: Creating Synergy Across Systems to Close Achievement Gaps and Improve Opportunities for Young Children (2011), by Kristie Kauerz and Abby Thorman, is available online at http://www.buildinitiative.org/WhatsNew/ViewArticle/tabid/96/smid/412/ArticleID/109/Default.aspx

493. PALS Journal from the Center for Early Literacy Learning

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - Retrieved May 3, 2011

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) has released of a new product called the PALS Journal. The journal is a log that can be used to record how parents or practitioners implement each phase of the Participatory Adult Learning Strategy (PALS). It can be used by trainers or coaches to prepare for the delivery of CELL practices with parents or practitioners. It is available at http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/ta_pract_tools1.php#palsjournal

494. Autism Awareness Resources Posted by the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities

Source: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities

The National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD) recently posted feature articles about autism on CDC's home page:

NCBDDD also recorded 2 podcasts encouraging parents to learn about developmental milestones:

495. The State of Preschool 2010: State Preschool Yearbook

Source: National Institute for Early Education Research - April 26, 2011

The National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) has released the eighth in a series of annual reports profiling state-funded prekindergarten programs in the United States. The State of Preschool 2010: State Preschool Yearbook (2011) presents data on state-funded prekindergarten during the 2009-2010 school year, showing that total enrollment barely increased over the prior year, total spending by the states decreased, and per-child spending declined in inflation-adjusted dollars. It is available online at http://nieer.org/yearbook/

At a press conference for the yearbook, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan spoke about federal investments in preschool education, particularly concerning Race to the Top funding. His remarks are available online at http://www.ed.gov/news/speeches/secretary-arne-duncans-remarks-release-national-institute-early-education-research-rep

496. Early Childhood Education Professional Development: Training and Technical Assistance Glossary

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children and National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies - Retrieved April 29, 2011

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (NACCRRA) have released a new Early Childhood Education Professional Development: Training and Technical Assistance Glossary (2011), which is meant to provide common understandings, or starting points, for individuals who provide professional development (PD), state policy makers, early education advocates, and program administrators working to connect PD activities and initiatives. It is available at http://www.naeyc.org/policy/ecwsi#PD_definitions

497. Resources for Working Effectively with Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Source: National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorder and the IDEA Partnership - Retrieved April 13, 2011

The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorder (NPDC on ASD) has identified 24 evidence-based practices for working effectively with individuals with autism spectrum disorder and is in the process of developing free online modules for each of these practices. Evidence-based practice (EBP) briefs for these 24 practices have also been developed. These include an overview of the practice, directions for implementation, an implementation checklist, the evidence base for the practice, and supplemental materials.

Additionally, the IDEA Partnership has added new resources to its Collection on Autism Spectrum Disorder, including: an updated Glossary, Resource Guide, new Dialogue Guides, and a new PowerPoint with Presenter Guide on Functional Behavioral Assessment. To learn more, go to http://ideapartnership.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1493

498. A Systematic Review of Early Intensive Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: Pediatrics - April 4, 2011

On April 4, 2011, Pediatrics published an article in which researchers examined the evidence on early intensive behavioral interventions for young children with autism spectrum disorders. The authors found that although studies of these approaches have shown some improvements in cognitive performance, language skills, and adaptive behavior skills, there is very little good quality research that supports those benefits. They conclude that early intensive intervention approaches have significant potential, but need further research to determine which are most likely to benefit specific children. An abstract of the article is available online at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2011/04/04/peds.2011-0426.abstract

Full citation: Warren, Z., McPheeters, M. L., Sathe, N., Foss-Feig, J. H., Glasser, A., & Veenstra-VanderWeele, J. (2011). A systematic review of early intensive intervention for autism spectrum disorders. Pediatrics, published online April 4, 2011. doi:10.1542/peds.2011-0426

499. Proposed Regulations to Clarify and Update the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

Source: U.S. Department of Education and Data Quality Campaign - April 8, 2011

On April 8, 2011, the U.S. Department of Education (ED) released a notice of proposed rulemaking to clarify and update the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). FERPA protects the privacy of education records, while allowing for the effective use of data in statewide longitudinal data systems (SLDS). The public comment period for the proposed regulations will close on May 23, 2011. To learn more, go to https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/04/08/2011-8205/family-educational-rights-and-privacy

On a related note, the Data Quality Campaign will host a webinar featuring FERPA legal expert, Steve Winnick, to offer an initial analysis of the proposed regulations, including the extent to which they provide clarity to states to both use data for continuous improvement and protect the privacy, security, and confidentiality of student-level data. To learn more, go to http://www.dataqualitycampaign.org/events/details/288

500. Evidence-Based Home Visiting Briefs

Source: Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall - Retrieved April 1, 2011

Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago are producing a series of briefs about home visiting, using information from grantees funded by the Children's Bureau to implement one of five evidence-based home visiting models. These briefs and other related reports can be accessed online at http://supportingebhv.org/crossite. Recent briefs include:
- Supporting Home Visitors in Evidence-Based Programs
- Recruiting and Training Home Visitors for Evidence-Based Home Visiting
- Assessing the Need for Evidence-Based Home Visiting
- Replicating Evidence-Based Home Visiting Models: A Framework for Assessing Fidelity

501. April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway - Retrieved March 21, 2011

April is Child Abuse Prevention month and the Child Welfare Information Gateway has published a collection of resources on their 2011 National Child Abuse Prevention Website (http://www.childwelfare.gov/preventing/preventionmonth/) that includes:

  • Strengthening Families and Communities: 2011 Resource Guide
  • Tip sheets that address particular parenting concerns and questionsin English and Spanishto distribute to parents and caregivers
  • A calendar for April full of activities that relate to the Five Protective Factors
  • Child Abuse Prevention Month widgets to post on your website
  • A video showing how Child Welfare Information Gateway connects professionals with information and resources on preventing child abuse and neglect

502. The Impact of Race on Participation in Part C Early Intervention Services

Source: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics - Retrieved March 18, 2011

The March 2011 issue of the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics includes an article that looks at the impact of race on receipt of early intervention (EI) services among children aged birth to 3. Using data from the Early Child Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort, the authors found that at 9 months of age, of 1000 children eligible for EI services, only 9% received services and race was not a predictor of service receipt. At 24 months of age, 12% of eligible children received services and black children were 5 times less likely than white children to be in this group. An abstract is available at http://journals.lww.com/jrnldbp/Abstract/publishahead/The_Impact_of_Race_on_Participation_in_Part_C.99832.aspx

Citation: Feinberg, E., Silverstein, M., Donahue, S. (2011). The impact of race on participation in Part C early intervention services. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, March 8, 2011. doi: 10.1097/DBP.0b013e3182142fbd

503. Early Care and Education for Children in Immigrant Families

Source: The Future of Children - Retrieved March 18, 2011

The latest issue of The Future of Children (Spring 2011) focuses on immigrant children. One article, Early Care and Education for Children in Immigrant Families, by Lynn A. Karoly and Gabriella C. Gonzalez, looks at the potential for early care and education (ECE) programs in promoting healthy development for immigrant children. Although early childhood education (ECE) programs have been shown to have substantial benefits to children as they go through school, immigrant children have lower rates of participation than their native counterparts. The article is available online at http://www.futureofchildren.org/futureofchildren/publications/journals/article/index.xml?journalid=74&articleid=541. To see the entire journal issue, go to http://www.futureofchildren.org/futureofchildren/publications/journals/journal_details/index.xml?journalid=74

504. Grant Notice - Research Center to Support Secondary Analyses of Head Start Impact Study Data

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families - March 1, 2011

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families has issued a grant notice to fund a research center focused on secondary analysis of the Head Start Impact Study data. The goal of this cooperative agreement will be to utilize existing data from the Head Start Impact Study to answer applied questions related to program characteristics that positively influence outcomes for Head Start children and families. The grant will be awarded to a single institution that will lead a consortium of researchers in the implementation of several complementary studies using the Head Start Impact Study data to answer questions related to how aspects of Head Start centers, classrooms, and teachers moderate impacts on children and families.
Letter of Intent Date: 03/31/2011
Application Due Date: 05/02/2011
To learn more, go to http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/open/foa/view/HHS-2011-ACF-OPRE-YR-0144

505. Resources on Assistive Technology (AT) Reuse and Ongoing AT Assessment in Early Intervention

Source: Tots-n-Tech Research Institute - Retrieved March 3, 2011

The Tots-n-Tech Research Institute has published a new resource brief designed to assist states and agencies enhance their use of assistive technology (AT) in early intervention. Resource Brief 7: Technology Reuse (2011) includes information on AT reuse, tips for starting your own reuse program, and other helpful reuse resources. It can be accessed on the Tots-n-Tech website at http://tnt.asu.edu/practical-resources/briefs

The Tots 'n Tech Research Institute's December 2010 newsletter is also now available online. It contains information about ongoing assistive technology assessment and embedding assistive technology into children's daily activities and routines. To access the newsletter, go to http://tnt.asu.edu/home/news

506. Spotlight on Young Children and Child Welfare

Source: Children's Bureau Express - February 22, 2011

This month, the Children's Bureau Express spotlights young children involved with child welfare, including the intersection of child welfare with related services that impact young children and their families. It is available online at http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewSection&issueID=123&subsectionID=31. Articles include:

  • Substance-Exposed Newborns and the AIA Resource Center
  • Keeping Young Children Safely With Their Families: The QIC on Early Childhood
  • State Strategies to Support Parents of Young Children
  • Helping Child Care and Early Childhood Centers Strengthen Families
  • Ethical Practice When Representing Very Young Children
  • Predictors of Harsh Parenting Practices With Young Children

507. New Response to Intervention in Early Childhood (RTI-EC) Resources Available

Source: National Professional Development Center on Inclusion - February 14, 2011

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), the Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children (DEC), and the National Head Start Association (NHSA) are collaborating to develop a joint position statement on Response to Intervention in Early Childhood (RTI-EC). In 2009-2010, leaders of the three organizations, with support from the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion, held eight public forums and two additional meetings, one with a group of National Experts, and another with a joint DEC-NAEYC-NHSA Work Group. A resource list and summaries of the meetings are now available online at http://npdci.fpg.unc.edu/resources/articles/RTI-EC. Later in 2011, a draft of the position statement will be posted at this Web site for national input. Contact Camille Catlett if you have any questions about thte process (camille.catlett@unc.edu or 919/966-6635).

508. Building the Brain's "Air Traffic Control" System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function

Source: Center for the Developing Child at Harvard University - February 9, 2011

Executive functioning skills help us to focus on multiple streams of information at the same time and revise plans as necessary. Acquiring the early building blocks of these skills is an important and challenging task in the early childhood years. A new joint Working Paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and the National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs explains how these skills develop, what can disrupt their development, and how supporting them pays off in school and life. Building the Brain's "Air Traffic Control" System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function (February 2011) is available online at http://developingchild.harvard.edu/index.php/resources/reports_and_working_papers/working_papers/wp11/

509. New Videos Recently Posted on the Results Matter Video Library Site

Source: Colorado Department of Education's Results Matter Program - February 2, 2011

The Colorado Department of Education's Results Matter Program has been facilitating learning communities of early childhood educators, special educators, and early intervention providers who are using video to enhance their work. The Video Library provides illustrations of their work and clips of children participating in typical activities that can be used for practicing observation, documentation, and assessment skills in professional development programs. Over 20 new videos have recently been added and can be watched the online or downloaded for free clips at http://www.cde.state.co.us/resultsmatter/RMVideoSeries.htm Two of the new additions include:

510. Children's Bureau Express Spotlights Young Children and Child Welfare

Source: Children's Bureau Express - February 1, 2011

This month, the Children's Bureau Express spotlights young children involved with child welfare, including the intersection of child welfare with related services that impact young children and their families, such as substance use, child care, family strengthening, and more. It is available online at http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewSection&issueID=123&subsectionID=31. Articles include:

  • Substance-Exposed Newborns and the AIA Resource Center
  • Keeping Young Children Safely With Their Families: The QIC on Early Childhood
  • State Strategies to Support Parents of Young Children
  • Helping Child Care and Early Childhood Centers Strengthen Families
  • Ethical Practice When Representing Very Young Children
  • Predictors of Harsh Parenting Practices With Young Children

511. Opportunities for Well-Coordinated Systems of Care for Young Children With Developmental Delay

Source: The Urban Institute - January 24, 2011

Early Intervention services supporting healthy development can reduce the incidence of disorders that have high costs and long-term consequences for children's health, education, and well-being. Unfortunately access to these services continues to be a challenge for many families. A new brief in the Urban Institute's "Improving the Lives of Young Children" series examines new opportunities that will soon be available under health reform and other federal legislation for states to develop well-coordinated systems of care for vulnerable young children. Opportunities for Care Coordination and Case Management for Children Receiving Services for Developmental Delay (January 2011), by Carrie Hanlon, is available online at http://www.urban.org/publications/412289.html

512. Self-Control in Early Childhood Can Lead to Better Health, Wealth, And Public Safety

Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Science - January 24, 2011

Findings from a study following 1,000 children from birth to age 32 show that children who displayed more self-control at age 3 had better health, less dependence on drugs or alcohol and higher annual incomes as adults than children with less self control. They were also less likely to be single parents or to have been convicted of a crime. This was true even after taking into account factors such as IQ and social class. In another cohort of 500 sibling pairs, the sibling with more self-control had better outcomes, despite a shared family background. These findings underscore the importance of addressing self-control issues in the earliest years. The article is freely available online through the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) open access option. Go to http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2011/01/20/1010076108.abstract

Citation: Moffitt, T. E., Arseneault, L., Belsky, D., Dickson, N., Hancox, R. J. , Harrington, H., ... Caspi, A. (2011). A gradient of childhood self-control predicts health, wealth, and public safety. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Published online before print January 24, 2011, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1010076108

513. New Issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education Available Online

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - Retrieved January 7, 2011

The International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is an online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. The December 2010 issue of INT-JECSE is now available online. The topic is Early Childhood Intervention around Europe. To see the table of contents and access the full-text of this issue, go to http://www.int-jecse.net/V2N3.htm

514. 2011-2012 Teaching Ambassador Fellowship Applications Available

Source: U.S. Department of Education - December 22, 2010

Applications for the U.S. Department of Education's Teaching Ambassador Fellowship program are now available online. Teaching Ambassadors are outstanding teachers with a record of leadership, strong communication skills, and policy insight who work for one year for the U.S. Department of Education, either full-time in Washington, DC or part-time in their home states. The program enables a cadre of outstanding teachers, including early learning teachers, to contribute their classroom expertise to the national dialogue and in turn facilitate discussions with educators across the country. More information and details about how to apply are available at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/teacherfellowship/index.html. Application deadline is January 17, 2011. For additional information, please contact Gillian Cohen-Boyer at 202-401-1259.

515. Special Issue: Young Children and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

Source: Early Childhood Research & Practice - Retrieved December 29, 2010

The Fall 2010 issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice is now available online. This special issue focuses on the topic of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in the lives of young children. An introduction is available at http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v12n2/intro.html. The table of contents and the full-text of all articles can be accessed at http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v12n2/index.html

516. Enhancing Teaching Practices to Improve Language and Literacy Skills for Latino Dual-Language Learners

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - November 22, 2010

The FPG Child Development Institute has released a new Snapshot that provides a brief summary of findings from a professional development intervention study examining outcomes for teachers and for young children who are dual language learners. Enhancing Teaching Practices to Improve Language and Literacy Skills for Latino Dual-Language Learners, FPG Snapshot #62, 2010, is available at http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~snapshots/FPG-Snapshot-62.pdf

To Learn More, see the full article:
Buysse, V., Castro, D.C., & Peisner-Feinberg, E. (2010). Effects of a professional development program on classroom practices and outcomes for Latino dual language learners. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 25(2), 194-206. See also, Nuestros Niños Research Program - http://nnrp.fpg.unc.edu/

517. New! Webinar Series on the Social Emotional Development of Young Children

Source: IDEA Infant & Toddler Coordinators Association - Retrieved November 8, 2010

In recent years, there have been increased referrals of children with potential delays in social emotional development to programs for young children funded by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). In response to this new challenge, a webinar series on the importance of social emotional development as a stepping stone to positive outcomes for young children has been developed collaboratively by the IDEA Infant & Toddler Coordinators Association (ITCA), the IDEA 619 Consortium, and the Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI). The series is relevant to individuals who serve infants, toddlers and preschoolers with disabilities. It is available online at http://www.ideainfanttoddler.org/webinars.htm

518. New Guide to Building High-Quality Early Childhood State Systems

Source: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices - Retrieved October 29, 2010

The National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) recently published Building Ready States: A Governor's Guide to Supporting a Comprehensive, High-Quality Early Childhood State System (October 2010), which offers six policy strategies governors can use to build and nurture comprehensive, high-quality early childhood systems. It is available online at http://www.nga.org/files/live/sites/NGA/files/pdf/1010GOVSGUIDEEARLYCHILD.PDF

519. Access to Education and Community Activities for Young Children with Disabilities

Source: National Center for Special Education Research - October 27, 2010

The National Center for Special Education Research NCSER) has published a new report, Access to Educational and Community Activities for Young Children with Disabilities (October 2010), which finds that most kindergarteners with disabilities are educated in a regular education classroom. Based on data from the Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS), the report covers access to community activities and kindergarten classroom experiences for young children with disabilities and examines how access and participation in these activities may vary by child, family, and school district characteristics. For more information, see the report at: http://ies.ed.gov/ncser/pubs/20113000/pdf/20113000.pdf

520. The Pyramid Model Story Project

Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - Retrieved October 21, 2010

The Pyramid Model for Supporting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children is a conceptual framework of evidence-based practices developed by the Center for the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) and the Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI). TACSEI recently developed a new resource, the Pyramid Model Story Project, where the programs, professionals and families who have used the model can share their experiences. To contribute a story or to learn how others have benefited from use of the model, go to http://www.challengingbehavior.org/do/pyramid_model/pyramid_model_story_project.html

521. State-by-State Fact Sheets - Supporting State Child Care Efforts with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funds

Source: National Women's Law Center - October 8, 2010

The National Women's Law Center recently published state-by-state fact sheets that provide information on how American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds are being used by states to maintain or expand access to child care assistance for families and to support initiatives to enhance the quality of care. They are available online at http://www.nwlc.org/resource/supporting-state-child-care-efforts-american-recovery-and-reinvestment-act-funds-state-stat

522. Assessing a Child's Need for Assistive Technology

Source: Tots-n-Tech Research Institute and Family Center on Technology and Disability - Retrieved October 4, 2010

Two recent newsletters provide information on assessing a child's need for assistive technology to enhance participation in everyday activities and routines.

523. New Report on Quality Rating Improvement Systems

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - October 7, 2010

Improving the Odds for Young Children (ITO) at the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has released a new report, Features of Professional Development and On-site Assistance in Child Care Quality Rating Improvement Systems: A Survey of State-wide Systems. This report presents findings from an interview study that investigated features of the professional development and on-site assistance available to center-based staff and home-based providers who participate in states' Quality Rating Improvement Systems. It is available at http://nccp.org/publications/pub_970.html

524. Early Childhood Intervention around Europe - Special Issue of INT-JECSE

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - September 22, 2010

The International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is an online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. A new, special issue of INT-JECSE is now available online. The topic is Early Childhood Intervention around Europe. To access the full-text of this special issue, go to: http://www.int-jecse.net/V2N2.htm.

525. New Publications from the Early Childhood Data Collaborative

Source: Early Childhood Data Collaborative - Retrieved September 10, 2010

The Early Childhood Data Collaborative has released the following two new publications:

  • Building and Using Coordinated State Early Care and Education Data Systems: A Framework for States (2010) - http://www.dataqualitycampaign.org/resources/details/1015 - This white paper discusses why states should build longitudinal data systems for early care and education, describes the ten fundamentals of a coordinated system with state examples, and provides guidance on how to ensure appropriate access to data, which includes building the capacity for stakeholders to use the data for continuous improvement.
  • Getting Started: 10 Fundamentals of Coordinated State Early Care and Education Data Systems (2010) - http://www.dataqualitycampaign.org/resources/details/1016 - This brochure highlights the importance of coordinated and longitudinal data systems and what states can do to start building them to inform continuous improvement in early care and education.

The Early Childhood Data Collaborative (ECDC) is a new consortium of national organizations convened to build state policymaker understanding and support of aligned early childhood data systems to improve child outcomes and system performance. Partners include: Council of Chief State School Officers, Data Quality Campaign, National Center for Children in Poverty, National Conference of State Legislatures, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, and Pre-K Now. Its work is funded by the Birth to Five Policy Alliance and the Pew Charitable Trusts.

526. Tots 'n Tech Newsletter on Using Low-Tech Assistive Technology and Adaptations

Source: Tots 'n Tech Research Institute - Retrieved August 20, 2010

The Tots 'n Tech Research Institute (TnT) has published its August 2010 newsletter, which provides tips on using low-tech assistive technology (AT) and adaptations that are inexpensive, easy to make, and useful for increasing young children's participation in daily activities and routines. The newsletter is available online at http://tnt.asu.edu/files/August2010.pdf

527. Strategies to Increase the Voice of Families from Diverse Backgrounds

Source: Family Voices of Wisconsin - Retrieved August 9, 2010

Family Voices of Wisconsin has published a report documenting conversations with Latino and African-American parents of children and youth with special needs (CYSN) about: perceived barriers to working in partnership with professionals on decision-making; recommendations for supporting partnerships and decision-making; and recommendations for parent participation on advisory committees. The report includes a checklist for recruiting and supporting parents from diverse backgrounds for advisory roles. Shared Participation: Strategies to Increase the Voice of Families from Diverse Backgrounds as Partners and Advisors (2010) is available online at http://www.fvofwi.org/Publications/SharedParticipation.pdf.

528. Pediatric Practices Struggle with Referrals for Developmental Disorders

Source: Commonwealth Fund - Retrieved August 13, 2010

A recent study of pediatric practices participating in an American Academy of Pediatrics pilot program to implement screening for developmental problems found that monthly screening rates across practices increased from 68 percent to 86 percent of children at recommended screening visits. However, many practices had difficulty tracking referrals and those that did track referrals found that many families did not follow through. To learn more, go to www.commonwealthfund.org/Content/Publications/In-the-Literature/2010/Aug/Implementing-Developmental-Screening-and-Referrals.aspx

529. New Fact Sheets on Head Start and Early Head Start Programs in 2009

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - Retrieved August 11, 2010

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) has released two new fact sheets providing data on children enrolled in Head Start and Early Head Start programs in 2009. Some key facts include:

  • In 2009, Head Start served more than 900,000 children and their families.
  • 12 percent of the children in Head Start programs had a disability.
  • Spanish was the primary home language for 24 percent of children in Head Start programs.
  • Early Head Start (EHS) served more than 83,000 children under age 3 and about 9,600 pregnant women.
  • 65 percent of families served by EHS included at least one working parent, and 22 percent included at least one parent in school or job training.
  • By the end of the program year, 97 percent of EHS children had a medical home for ongoing care.

Head Start Participants, Programs, Families and Staff in 2009 (July 2010) - http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/hs-preschool-pir-2009.pdf
Early Head Start Participants, Programs, Families and Staff in 2009 (July 2010) - http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/ehs-pir-2009.pdf

530. Recent Publications from the National Center for Children in Poverty

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - Retrieved August 5, 2010

The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) recently released a number of new publications related to early childhood care and development. These include:

531. Practice Guides with Adaptations for Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers with Disabilities

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - July 28, 2010

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) has published 15 new CELL practice guides with adaptations for infants, toddlers and preschoolers, which show how to adapt early literacy activities so that young children with disabilities can participate. The guides can be used by practitioners or parents, or by parents in collaboration with practitioners. They describe everyday home, community, and childcare learning opportunities that encourage early literacy learning. All are available online at http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/pg_tier2.php

Two CELL papers on the social validity and readability of the practice guides with adaptations are also now available online at http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/productscp.php

532. Article Highlights Evidence-Based Practices for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - July 9, 2010

A new issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is now available online. Of special interest is the fourth article, written by Dr. L. Lynn Stansberry-Brusnahan and Dr. Lana L. Collet-Klingenberg, which highlights evidence-based practices for young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and discusses guidelines and recommendations from the National Resource Council and the National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders. This article is available full-text online at http://www.int-jecse.net/V2N1-ARTICLE4.pdf. The entire journal is available at http://www.int-jecse.net/V2N1.htm

533. Policy Brief on TANF Reauthorization and Charting a New Course for Young Children in Poverty

Source: ZERO TO THREE - July 7, 2010

In anticipation of the reauthorization of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, ZERO TO THREE has released a revised policy brief about TANF and how improvements in this program might impact the developmental trajectories of young children living in poverty. Charting a New Course for Young Children in Poverty: Reauthorization of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Program (2010) is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/public-policy/policy-toolkit/tanf-june-16-2010.pdf

534. WWC Releases Evidence Standards for Regression Discontinuity and Single-Case Designs

Source: What Works Clearinghouse, Institute of Education Sciences - Retrieved July 7, 2010

The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) has released evidence standards for regression discontinuity and single-case designs. These standards allow the WWC to review an expanded set of research, particularly in special education. Like random assignment studies, well-designed and well-implemented regression discontinuity and single case designs can attain the highest WWC rating that can be assigned to a study, "meets standards." The standards are the work of two expert panels led by Peter Schochet (regression discontinuity) and Thomas Kratochwill (single-case designs).

535. Supporting the Social-Emotional Wellbeing of Children in Part C Early Intervention Programs

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - June 11, 2010

A new brief from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) discusses exemplary policies and practices that highlight the potential of the Part C Early Intervention Program to play a major role in reducing the risk of long-term social-emotional and behavioral difficulties of vulnerable children. Promoting the Social-emotional Wellbeing of Infants and Toddlers in Early Intervention Programs: Promising Strategies in Four Communities (June 2010), by Taniesha A. Woods, Sheila Smith, and Janice L. Cooper is available online at http://nccp.org/publications/pub_946.html

536. Recession and Drop in Pre-K Enrollment Could Impact Long-Term Educational Outcomes

Source: Foundation for Child Development - June 8, 2010

The Foundation for Child Development has published the 2010 Child Well-Being Index, which provides comprehensive data on the impact of the recession on American children's quality-of-life. According to the report, the number of children living in poverty will rise to 15.6 million in 2010, an increase of more than 3 million children in four years. In the press release, Ruby Takanishi, president of the Foundation for Child Development, mentions a drop in pre-kindergarten enrollment as being of particular concern, because it could impact the educational outcomes of children for years to come.

To access the report, go to http://www.fcd-us.org/resources/2010-child-well-being-index-cwi?doc_id=1266393.
See also, the Hechinger Report's discussion on this issue - http://hechingerreport.org/content/tough-times-ahead-for-children-of-the-great-recession-report-finds_2997/

537. Study Links Regular Bedtimes to Better Language, Reading and Math Skills in Preschool Children

Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine - June 7, 2010

On June 7, 2010, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine released findings from a study showing that preschoolers who get adequate sleep score higher on a range of developmental assessments. The findings suggested that among sleep habits, having a regular bedtime was the most consistent predictor of positive developmental outcomes at 4 years of age. The group recommends that preschoolers should sleep at least 11 hours a night. To learn more, see the press release at http://www.aasmnet.org/Articles.aspx?id=1707

538. Home-School Differences: What it Means for Kindergarten Readiness

Source: National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education - Retrieved June 11, 2010

The National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education (NCRECE) has published a new short brief, entitled Home-School Differences: What it Means for Kindergarten Readiness (NCRECE In Focus, v.1, no.4, May 2010), which summarizes the findings from a study that looked at how differences between home and school environments impact children's school readiness. The results raise questions about the commonly held assumption that similarity of beliefs and practices between homes and schools lead to better outcomes for children. To read the brief, go to http://www.ncrece.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/ncreceinfocus-v1-i4-home-school-differences.pdf. It is based on the following article:

539. Promoting Caregivers' Use of Everyday Child Language Learning Practices

Source: Center on Everyday Child Language Learning - Retrieved June 3, 2010

The Center on Everyday Child Language Learning (CECLL) has updated a paper that describes the adult learning procedure used at CECLL to promote practitioners' abilities to support parents' use of everyday child language learning practices. The approach, Participatory Adult Learning Strategy (PALS), includes 4 phases: introduction, application, informed understanding, and repeated learning opportunities to further develop understanding and use of everyday language learning practices. Adult Learning Process for Promoting Caregiver Adoption of Everyday Child Language Learning Practices: Revised and Updated (Practically Speaking, v.2, n.1, 2010), by Melinda Raab, Carl J. Dunst, and Carol M. Trivette is available at http://www.cecll.org/download/Practically_Speaking_v2n1.pdf

CECLL is a model demonstration center funded by the U.S Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) and is a major initiative of the Center for Evidence-Based Practices at the Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute.

540. Interview with Lead Researchers on Response to Intervention in Early Childhood

Source: Institute of Education Sciences - May 21, 2010

The May 2010 newsletter from the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) features an interview with Judith Carta and Charles Greenwood, two lead researchers from the Center for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood (CRTIEC) that began in July 2008. CRTIEC is a 5-year project focused on developing and evaluating Response to Intervention (RtI) models for young children in order to increase the number of young children who enter school with knowledge and skill in early literacy and language. To learn more, read the interview online at http://ies.ed.gov/whatsnew/newsletters/?index=roundncser

541. Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program - Introductory Materials Available

Source: HRSA and ACF - May 7, 2010

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the Administration on Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently released introductory materials related to the new Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, which was created as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act earlier this year. HRSA and ACF will be partnering with the States and other interested parties to develop an effective and well-coordinated program to promote early childhood health and development and improve outcomes and opportunities for children and families. To learn more, see http://www.nectac.org/~docs/enotes/home_visiting.doc

542. Spring 2010 Issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice

Source: Clearinghouse on Early Education and Parenting, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - May 6, 2010

The Spring 2010 issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice (ECRP) is now available online. It includes a special section on working with infants and toddlers, an article on young children's mental health services in the U.S., and more... To access the full-text of this peer-reviewed, free, bilingual journal go to http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v12n1/index.html

543. Tips for Using Assistive Technology with Young Children

Source: Tots 'n Tech Research Institute - Retrieved April 28, 2010

The appropriate use of simple adaptations and/or assistive technology (AT) can support inclusion and natural learning opportunities for young children with disabilities. The Tots 'n Tech Research Institute (TnT) publishes a newsletter that provides many useful tips on how to adapt everyday materials to enhance the participation of infants and toddlers in a variety of daily activities and routines. Current and past issues are available online at http://tnt.asu.edu/home/news

544. Newly Redesigned Web Site for Parents from NAEYC

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children - Retrieved April 28, 2010

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) has launched a newly redesigned Web site for parents and families that provides tips on finding quality child care, an easy to use search feature for finding NAEYC-Accredited programs across the country, parent-focused articles and videos, and other resources. It is available at http://www.rightchoiceforkids.org/

545. Supporting State Child Care Efforts with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funds

Source: National Women's Law Center - April 16, 2010

A new report from the National Women's Law Center, entitled Supporting State Child Care Efforts with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funds (April 2010), looks at how states are using funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to maintain or increase access to child care for children and families. It is available online at http://action.nwlc.org/site/PageServer?pagename=Child_Care_ARRA_Report_Intermediary_Request

546. Six States to Participate in New Initiative to Build High-Quality Early Childhood State Infrastructures

Source: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices - April 12, 2010

On April 12, 2010, the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) announced that it has selected six states - Kansas, Louisiana, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington - to develop high-quality, comprehensive state early childhood systems through a new initiative, Ready States: A Project to Develop Key Components of State Early Childhood Infrastructure. Currently, approximately 60 percent of children aged 0-5 spend time in early childhood programs and the initiative is meant to help ensure that these children receive the support and experiences they need to grow and learn. For more information, go to http://www.nga.org/portal/site/nga/menuitem.50aeae5ff70b817ae8ebb856a11010a0/

547. A Next Social Contract for the Primary Years of Education

Source: New America Foundation - March 30, 2010

On March 30, 2010, the New America Foundation's Early Education Initiative released a report entitled A Next Social Contract for the Primary Years of Education. The report recommends an education system that serves children starting at age 3, erases the divide between "preschool" and "K-12" programs and fosters a more seamless system connecting districts, schools, Head Start and independent centers of early learning. To learn more and to access the report, go to http://earlyed.newamerica.net/pressroom/2010/a_next_social_contract_for_the_primary_years_of_education

548. Supporting Parents of Young Children in the Child Welfare System

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - February 23, 2010

A new report from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), entitled, Supporting Parents of Young Children in the Child Welfare System (February 2010) by Katherine A. Beckmann, Jane Knitzer, and Janice L. Cooper, discusses the challenges and opportunities of improving mandated parent training for parents of young children in the child welfare system. Drawing on lessons learned from research and practice it recommends a more intentional, cost effective, and strategic approach to required parent training. It is available online at http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_920.html

549. Technical Assistance to Promote Service and System Change

Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - Retrieved February 3, 2010

The Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI) has published the fourth installment in its Roadmap to Effective Intervention Practices series. Technical Assistance to Promote Service and System Change (November 2009) by Karen A. Blase, discusses TA strategies to initiate, implement, and sustain effective practice and systems change. It is meant to assist a range of stakeholders (e.g., early childhood service providers, parents, technical assistance providers) understand the types of technical assistance (TA) that are most beneficial to achieve particular practice and systems outcomes. It is available online at http://www.challengingbehavior.org/do/resources/documents/roadmap_4.pdf

550. What Every School Administrator Should Know about Title I, Pre-K and School Reform

Source: Pre-K Now - Retrieved February 5, 2010

Pre-K Now has published a new white paper, Tapping Title I: What Every School Administrator Should Know about Title I, Pre-K and School Reform (January 2010), which provides basic information about using Title I resources to support high-quality early education initiatives. It is available online at http://www.preknow.org/documents/TitleI_PartII_Jan2010.pdf

The paper is a companion to Pre-K Now's earlier white paper, New Beginnings: Using Federal Title I Funds to Support Local Pre-K Efforts (September 2009), available at http://www.preknow.org/documents/titleI_Sep2009.pdf

551. Announcing New SpecialQuest Preschool Inclusion Series

Source: SpecialQuest Birth-Five: Head Start/Hilton Foundation Training Program - January 25, 2010

SpecialQuest Birth-Five announces the availability of new materials supporting high quality inclusion of preschoolers (ages 3 to 5) in early care and education settings. The new Preschool Inclusion Series highlights children with disabilities participating in inclusive environments. Classroom staff, administrators, specialists, and families share their perspectives on what makes inclusion work. The target audiences are early childhood professional development providers, faculty from colleges and universities, family leaders, and policy makers.

The new series contains four video programs (English, English open-captioned, Spanish open-captioned) with training scripts and handouts (English and Spanish). To download the materials or to order an individual set on DVD/CD, go to http://76.249.171.46/specialquest/trainingmaterials/

For questions, please contact Sandy Tradewell, Systems Coordinator, SpecialQuest Birth-Five, at sandy.tradewell@specialquest.org or 707.849.4290. Join the SpecialQuest Community by subscribing to the SpecialQuest e-newsletter at http://www.specialquest.org

552. Products for Practitioners from the Center on Everyday Child Language Learning

Source: Center on Everyday Child Language Learning - January 20, 2010

The Center on Everyday Child Language Learning (CECLL) recently posted five new products for practitioners on their Web Site. These products are designed to assist practitioners in implementing an approach to early childhood intervention that uses everyday activities as sources of learning opportunities to promote the development of the language and communication skills of young children with disabilities and delays. CECLL is a model demonstration center funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs and is a major initiative of the Center for Evidence-Based Practices at the Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute. To access the products, go to http://www.cecll.org/articles1.php.

553. The Health and Well-Being of Children: A Portrait of States and the Nation 2007

Source: Maternal and Child Health Bureau - Retrieved January 11, 2010

The Maternal and Child Health Bureau has published an online version of its chartbook, The Health and Well-Being of Children: A Portrait of States and the Nation 2007 (2009), which is based on data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health. The indicators present information on the health status and risk and protective factors experienced by children: on the National level, within the subpopulations who are at particular risk, and on the State level for each of the 50 States and the District of Columbia. It is available at http://mchb.hrsa.gov/nsch07/index.html

554. Impact - Feature Issue on Early Childhood Education and Children with Disabilities

Source: Institute on Community Integration - Retrieved December 3, 2009

The Institute on Community Integration, a federally designated University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), has recently published a feature issue of its newsletter, Impact, focused on inclusive early childhood education for young children with and without disabilities. In this issue, parents share their experiences with early childhood inclusion, researchers and practitioners discuss strategies for supporting quality early education experiences for young children with disabilities, and innovative inclusive early childhood programs from around the country describe their strategies and outcomes. To learn more go to http://ici.umn.edu/products/impact/221/default.html

555. Fact Sheet on Child Care and Development Block Grant Participation in 2008

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - December 3, 2009

A new fact sheet from the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) shows that fewer children were served through the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) program in 2008 than in 2007. The fact sheet includes data on the ages of children receiving assistance, the types of child care settings used, and the reasons families receive assistance. For complete information, see Child Care and Development Block Grant Participation in 2008, available online at http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/ccdbg-08-participation.pdf

556. New Research-Based Rationales on Supporting Infants and Toddlers in Child Care

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - November 18, 2009

As part of its Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care Project, the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) has published the following two new research-based rationales for its recommendations to states about how to support the healthy growth and development of infants and toddlers in child care settings:

  • Establish Core Competencies (November 2009)- http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/cp_rationale1.pdf
    This rationale discusses how state child care licensing, subsidy, and quality enhancement policies can move toward establishing a core body of knowledge, skills, and expertise that providers and caregivers need in order to give babies and toddlers quality care, based on current research on social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development. Provides recommendations, state examples, and online resources for state policymakers.
  • Provide Access to Training, Education, and Ongoing Supports (November 2009) - http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/cp_rationale2.pdf
    This rationale discusses how states can work to ensure access to specialized professional development for providers working with infants and toddlers, including participation in higher education programs, community-level training, ongoing individualized consultations, and access to appropriate information and supports. Includes recommendations, state examples, and online resources for state policymakers.

557. First Findings From the Kindergarten Data Collections of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B)

Source: National Center for Education Statistics - October 28, 2009

A new early childhood report from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) within the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) shows that children who participated in a regular nonparental early care and education arrangement the year before kindergarten scored higher on reading and math assessments than children who did not have those experiences. Using data from the final two rounds of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort, the report provides a snapshot of the demographic characteristics, reading and mathematics knowledge, fine motor skills, school characteristics, and before- and after-school care arrangements of the cohort at the time they first began kindergarten.

The full report, entitled Children Born in 2001 at Kindergarten Entry: First Findings From the Kindergarten Data Collections of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) (October 2009), is online at http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2010005

558. Head Start 2008 State Fact Sheets

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - October 22, 2009

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) recently published state fact sheets analyzing Head Start Program Information Report (PIR) data for 2008. Each fact sheet includes all Head Start programs in the state (Early Head Start, Head Start preschool, American Indian and Alaskan Native Head Start, and Migrant/Seasonal Head Start), as well as data on participants, families, staff, and programs.

To read the fact sheet for your state or community, go to http://www.clasp.org/in_the_states/
To view the national fact sheet, go to http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/headstartdata2008us.pdf

559. New Child Data Tool from the Center for Law and Social Policy

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - Retrieved October 6, 2009

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) recently released DataFinder, a new online tool that includes state and national data on: child care assistance spending and participation; Head Start and Early Head Start participation; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) expenditures; young child demographics; and poverty. Users can create custom tables that present a national picture, a state picture or a comparative look at states and communities. For more information go to http://www.clasp.org/data

560. New Findings on Training Teachers to Support Young Children's Behavior and Emotional Development

Source: MDRC - Retrieved October 9, 2009

MDRC, a non-profit, non-partisan education and social policy research organization, recently published a report, entitled Can Teacher Training in Classroom Management Make a Difference for Children's Experiences in Preschool? A Preview of Findings from the Foundations of Learning Demonstration (September 2009), by Pamela Morris, Cybele Raver, Chrishana M. Lloyd, and Megan Millenky. The report provides promising findings from Foundations of Learning (FOL), a demonstration and random assignment evaluation of an intervention that trains preschool teachers to better support young children's behavior and emotional development. It is available online at http://www.mdrc.org/publications/527/full.pdf

561. Recognition & Response - Webinar and Online Discussion

Source: Recognition and Response Project and National Professional Development Center for Inclusion - September 23, 2009

On Wednesday, September 30, 2009, from 2:00-3:30 pm ET, the Recognition and Response (R&R) Project at the FPG Child Development Institute will host a webinar entitled, Recognition & Response: Findings from the First Implementation Study, presented by Virginia Buysse and Ellen Peisner-Feinberg. The webinar will focus on the results of the first study to evaluate the use of R&R in pre-k classrooms and the educational benefits for children's language and literacy development. Recognition & Response (R&R) is a Response to Intervention (RTI) model designed for use with pre-k children. To register for this event, go to https://admin.acrobat.com/_a992899727/randr/event/registration.html

In advance of this webinar, the National Professional Development Center for Inclusion is hosting an online discussion entitled Research Evidence on Recognition and Response (R&R). Is there any evidence that Recognition & Response (R&R) benefits pre-k children in language and literacy? Join Virginia Buysse and Ellen Peisner-Feinberg to share your experiences, comments and questions at http://community.fpg.unc.edu/discussions/blog-speaking-of-inclusion/research-evidence-on-recognition-and-response?=NECTAC

562. House Approves Early Learning Challenge Fund Legislation

Source: Committee on Education and Labor - September 17, 2009

On September 17, 2009, the U.S. House of Representatives approved the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act (H.R 3221) by a bipartisan vote of 253 to 171. Among other investments, H.R. 3221 establishes an Early Learning Challenge Fund, an 8-billion dollar, 8-year investment to award competitive grants to states that implement comprehensive standards-based reforms to their early learning systems to help transform early education standards and practices, build an effective early childhood workforce, and improve the school readiness outcomes of young children. The Senate Committee is expected to take up the bill in the next few weeks.

To learn more, go to http://edlabor.house.gov/newsroom/2009/09/house-approves-legislation-to-1.shtml
See also, http://www2.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2009/09/09172009b.html

563. Webinar - Creative State Financing Structures for Infant-Toddler Services

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center and the Ounce of Prevention Fund - To be held October 7, 2009

On October 7, 2009 at 2:00 pm ET, the ZERO TO THREE Policy Center and the Ounce of Prevention Fund will host a webinar/web-based conference call on creative state financing structures for infant-toddler services. Four states' (Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma) with innovative models of investing in services for at-risk infants and toddlers will be highlighted. A joint policy paper from ZERO TO THREE and the Ounce of Prevention Fund will be released in conjunction with the webinar. Space for this conference call is limited.

Be sure to test your network and system compatibility with iLinc and prepare your computer prior to joining the webinar at https://demo.ilinc.com/perl/ilinc/lms/systest.pl?activity_id. A recording of the webinar and supporting materials will be posted on the ZERO TO THREE website at http://www.zerotothree.org/policywebinars for those who are unable to attend the live event.

564. Webcast - Ready for Success: Supporting Dual Language Learners in Head Start

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Head Start - To be held October 7, 2009

On October 7, 2009, 2:00-3:00 p.m. (ET), the Office of Head Start is launching a year-long series of professional development activities intended to help programs support the healthy development and learning of Dual Language Learners (DLLs). Information about the first Webcast in the series, Ready for Success: Supporting Dual Language Learners in Head Start, is available at http://www.fc-tv.com/clients/headstart/duallanguage/registration-test.asp

565. Webinar on Facilitating Early Childhood Transitions

Source: National Early Childhood Transition Center - To be held September 18, 2009

The National Early Childhood Transition Center (NECTC) is hosting a Webinar on September 18, 2009 at 1:00 PM EDT, entitled How Can We Facilitate Transitions? Choosing Practices and Strategies (Part 2). This webinar will present specific strategies that can be used to support transitions at ages 3 and 5, as well as strategies for supporting children from culturally diverse backgrounds and those with significant disabilities. Registration is now available online at http://www.hdi.uky.edu/nectc/webinar.aspx

566. Examples of State Policy Initiatives To Improve Child Care for Infants and Toddlers

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - September 11, 2009

As part of its Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project, the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) is profiling examples of policy initiatives that states are undertaking to improve child care for infants and toddlers. These state examples include links to relevant legislation and regulations, a description of how the state developed and implemented the policy, and any cost data and evaluations or other data. To learn more see State Examples from Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care, available at http://www.clasp.org/projects/page?id=0003

567. Article Highlights the Economic Benefits of Advancing a Birth to Five Agenda

Source: ZERO TO THREE - Retrieved September 8, 2009

A new article from ZERO TO THREE highlights the economic benefits of investing in the earliest years and provides a state example demonstrating these benefits. It includes tips and strategies for how your state or community can work with business leaders and economists to establish similar investments for infants, toddlers, and their families. A Proven Return on Investment: Economists and the Business Community Advance a Birth to Five Agenda (2009), by Kimberly Pearson, is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/Return_on_Investment.pdf?docID=9421

568. Promoting Social-emotional Wellbeing in Early Intervention Services: A Fifty-state View

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - September 4, 2009

The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has published a new brief, entitled Promoting Social-emotional Wellbeing in Early Intervention Services: A Fifty-state View (2009), by Janice L. Cooper and Jessica Vick. The brief reports on findings from a study done to determine how states are leveraging different policy choices to support the integration of social-emotional developmental strategies into Part C early intervention services. Part C coordinators from forty-eight states' participated in the study. To read the full report, go to http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_885.html

569. Education News Parents Can Use - A National Town Hall Meeting with Arne Duncan

Source: U.S. Department of Education - August 28, 2009

During the September 15, 2009 edition of Education News Parents Can Use, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan will participate in a discussion with parents across the nation by telephone, email, and with a studio audience. This event is one stop along the secretary's national Listening and Learning tour to gather input on the administration's education agenda, including: early childhood learning, quality schools, parent responsibility, higher standards, teacher quality, health and safety, workforce development, and higher education. For more information, go to http://registerevent.ed.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=viewer.description&intEventID=233

570. Comment Request - Proposed Use of Funds Under Title I, Part A and IDEA to Defray Data Collection Costs in the ARRA

Source: U.S. Education Department - August 17, 2009

On August 17, 2009, the U.S. Education Department published a proposal in the Federal Register to allow states to reserve more administrative funds under Title I, Part A and IDEA to defray data collection costs in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), including those related to administering, monitoring and reporting on use of ARRA funds. Comments must be received on or before September 16, 2009. To learn more, see the Federal Register notice at http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/E9-19662.htm. To see a related press release, go to http://www2.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2009/08/08142009a.html

571. Assistive Technology Self-Assessment Results

Source: Tots-n-Tech Research Institute - Retrieved August 12, 2009

Early intervention (EI) professionals from across the country recently participated in an online self-assessment, using a tool developed by the Tots-n-Tech (TnT) Research Institute. The purpose of the self-assessment was to gather state and regional information on how EI programs are doing in making assistive technology (AT) and adaptations available for infants and toddlers with developmental delays or disabilities. Complete information about the self-assessment tool and state specific results are available on the TnT Web site at http://tnt.asu.edu. Resource briefs designed to assist states and EI agencies improve their use of AT in early intervention are available at http://tnt.asu.edu/practical-resources/briefs. Over the next five years, TnT plans to use the self-assessment tool annually to monitor state's use of AT.

572. Recording of Conference Call on Early Learning Challenge Fund Available Online

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - July 28, 2009

On June 21, the House Education and Labor Committee created a new landmark program, the Early Learning Challenge Fund. If passed by Congress, this program will invest $1 billion a year over 8 years to improve the quality of programs for children birth to five. On July 20, 2009, Dr. Ruth Friedman, Senior Education Policy Advisor, House Committee on Education and Labor, provided information about the proposed legislation on a free conference call. To listen to a recording of the call go to http://www.clasp.org/federal_policy/pages?id=0007. To view a summary of the bill, go to http://edlabor.house.gov/documents/111/pdf/publications/SAFRA-EarlyLearning.pdf.

The call was sponsored by the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP), ZERO TO THREE, the National Women's Law Center, the National Association for the Education of Young Children, First Five Years Fund, the Early Care and Education Consortium, the National Head Start Association, the National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees.

573. New Paper on Response to Intervention and the Pyramid Model

Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - Retrieved July 24, 2009

Response to Intervention (RtI) offers a comprehensive model for the prevention of delays in learning and behavior. Although it was initially designed for K-12 programs, research supports the value of using the model within early childhood programs. The Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI) has published a new paper, Response to Intervention and the Pyramid Model (2009), which provides guidance to early childhood programs as they develop policies and procedures related to the adoption of RtI. It is available online at http://www.challengingbehavior.org//do/resources/papers.htm

574. Proposed Early Childhood Challenge Fund Legislation

Source: U.S. Department of Education and ZERO TO THREE - July 17, 2009

On July 15, 2009, the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2009 (H.R. 3221) was introduced in the House of Representatives. Title IV of this Act authorizes the Early Learning Challenge Fund, which will advance reforms to improve the quality of early childhood programs across the country. Today Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced their support of the proposed legislation and highlighted the Obama Administration's blueprint to improve and strengthen early learning programs.

On Monday, July 20, at 1:00 p.m. EST. Dr. Ruth Friedman, Senior Education Policy Advisor, House Committee on Education and Labor, will provide information about the proposed legislation on a free conference call. To register, go to http://www.clasp.org/federal_policy/pages?id=0007. The call is being sponsored by ZERO TO THREE, the National Women's Law Center, the Center for Law and Social Policy, the National Association for the Education of Young Children, First Five Years Fund, the Early Care and Education Consortium, the National Head Start Association, the National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees.

575. New Resource on Finding Funding for Initiatives that Seek to Improve Outcomes for Children

Source: The Finance Project - Retrieved July 6, 2009

The Annie E. Casey Foundation's Making Connections initiative provides support to help improve outcomes for children and families in disadvantaged neighborhoods. The Making Connections sites work on a range of activities to ensure that Children are Healthy and Prepared to Succeed in School (CHAPSS). A new guide from The Finance Project, entitled Finding Funding: Supporting Making Connections Core Result that Children are Healthy and Prepared to Succeed in School (2009), discusses diverse public and private funding sources that can be accessed, blended and braided to help meet the fiscal needs of such initiatives over time. It is available online at http://www.financeproject.org/publications/FindingFunding-SupportingMakingConnections.pdf

576. New Open-Access Journal on Issues Related to Young Children with Special Needs and Their Families

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - July 2, 2009

The International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is a new online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. INT-JECSE publishes empirical research, literature reviews, theoretical articles, and book reviews in all aspects of Early Intervention (EI)/Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE). Studies from diverse methodologies, including experimental studies using group or single-subject designs, descriptive studies using observational or survey methodologies, case studies, and qualitative studies, are welcome. The INT-JECSE is published twice (June and December) a year and can be accessed at http://www.int-jecse.net

577. HHS Rescinds Medicaid Final Rule on School-Based Administration/Transportation

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - June 30, 2009

On June 30, 2009, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published a final notice in the Federal Register rescinding the Medicaid final rule that would have eliminated reimbursement for some special-education expenses and for transporting Medicaid-eligible children to and from school, including children with special needs. Other Medicaid regulations are also being rescinded. These regulations, in whole or in part, have been subject to Congressional moratoria set to expire on July 1, 2009. The Federal Register notice is available at http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/E9-15345.htm

578. Head Start 2007 State Profiles

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - June 23, 2009

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) recently published individual state profiles showing 2007 data on programs, participants, families, and staff for Head Start programs in each state, including preschool, Early Head Start, American Indian and Alaskan Native Head Start, and Migrant or Seasonal Head Start. Profiles are also available for the six territories with Head Start and/or Early Head Start programs in 2007. State Profiles of 2007 Head Start Program Information Report (PIR) Data (2009) can be accessed online at http://www.clasp.org/issues/in_focus?type=child_care_and_early_education&id=0184

579. New Findings on Children with Special Health Care Needs and Medical Home Access

Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved June 11, 2009

An article in the June 2009 issue of Pediatrics presents updated information on the percentage of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) who have access to a medical home. Data from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) show that: (1) 47.1 percent of children have access to a medical home; (2) access was affected significantly by race/ethnicity, income, health insurance status, and severity of condition; (3) parents of children with a medical home report significantly less delayed or forgone care and fewer unmet needs for services; and (4) limited improvements have occurred since the 2001 NS-CSHCN. An abstract is available at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/123/6/e996

Full citation: Strickland BB, Singh GK, Kogan MD, et al. (2009). Access to the medical home: New findings from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Pediatrics 123(6):e996-e1004.

580. New DEC/NAEYC Position Statement on Early Childhood Inclusion

Source: DEC and NAEYC - June 4, 2009

The Division for Early Childhood (DEC) and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) have recently approved a joint position statement that underscores their commitment to quality early childhood inclusion. Early Childhood Inclusion: A Joint Position Statement of the Division for Early Childhood and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (2009) provides a shared national definition of inclusion as "the values, policies, and practices that support the right of every infant and young child and his or her family, regardless of ability, to participate in a broad range of activities and contexts as full members of families, communities, and society." The document, which was developed through a collaborative national process that the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPDCI) coordinated, represents the first time these two leading national organizations have partnered on a joint product that is expected to have a widespread impact on the early childhood field. It is available online at http://www.dec-sped.org/About_DEC/PositionConcept_Papers/Inclusion

581. Promising Early Returns: Educare Implementation Study Data

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - Retrieved June 5, 2009

Educare is a state-of-the-art school open full day and full year serving at-risk children from birth to five years old. Educare provides quality learning environments to help its students arrive at kindergarten healthy and ready to learn. The FPG Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill leads the Bounce Learning Network Implementation Study of the Educare model. In the 2007-08 school year, 5 Educare programs from across the country participated. A recent brief, entitled Promising Early Returns: Educare Implementation Study Data (2009), reports promising preliminary findings. Evaluation data show that more years of Educare attendance are associated with better school readiness and vocabulary skills. The brief is available online at http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~Bounce/assets/pdf/Promising_Early_Returns_4_14_09.pdf

582. New ARRA Resources from the Field

Source: NIEER, the Build Initiative, and the Education Commission of the States - Retrieved May 28, 2009

The following new resources from the early childhood field related to the use of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funds (ARRA) are available online. For official ARRA guidance from the U.S. Department of Education go to http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/leg/recovery/index.html:

Capitalizing on the Stimulus: A Rare Opportunity That Calls for Creative Thinking - NIEER Idea Factory (2009)

http://preschoolmatters.org/2009/05/21/stimulus-dollars/
A forum for sharing ideas, experiences and successes related to the creative use of ARRA funds for improving the quality of, access to and resources for high quality early childhood education. A project of the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER).

Opportunities to Incorporate Young Child Data into Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems through American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Funding (2009)

http://www.buildinitiative.org/files/SLDS%20and%20Early%20Childhood%20ARRA%20Funding%20Op%20Paper.pdf
Identifies ways in which ARRA funds could be used to help expand State Longitudinal Data Systems to incorporate important early childhood/preschool data and support continuous improvement in early learning systems development. Prepared by Charles Bruner, with Michelle Stover Wright, the Build Initiative.

Maximizing Reform in the Stimulus Bill: Supporting Effective Early Education (May 2009)

http://www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/80/59/8059.pdf
Provides recommendations on investments states and districts can make with ARRA funds to support high quality early childhood programs that will continue to produce benefits even after stimulus dollars are gone. Published by the Education Commission of the States.

583. Interview with Senator Ted Kennedy on the Federal Role in Early Care and Education

Source: National Institute for Early Education Research - May 15, 2009

The April/May 2009 issue of Preschool Matters, published by the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER), features an interview with Senator Ted Kennedy on the federal role in early care and education. It can be accessed at http://nieer.org/psm/index.php?article=293

584. Webinar on Applying RTI to Preschool Settings

Source: National Center for Learning Disabilities - May 12, 2009

On May 20, 2009 at 1 p.m. EST, the National Center for Learning Disabilities will host a webinar on applying Response to Intervention (RTI) to preschool settings. The webinar will be co-hosted by Mary Ruth Coleman and Froma Roth, authors of the recently published report, Roadmap to Pre-K RTI: Applying RTI to Preschool Settings. They will walk participants through the Roadmap and offer additional resources related to Pre-K RTI implementation.

To register and learn more go to https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/schedule/display.do?udc=ytcgdc898lcu
To read the related report go to http://www.rtinetwork.org/images/stories/learn/roadmaptoprekrti.pdf

585. CSEFEL Infant Toddler Training Modules Now Available in Spanish

Source: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) - April 24, 2009

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) recently announced a new Spanish version of its Promoting Social and Emotional Competence: Infant Toddler Training modules. These training modules include facilitator guides, trainer scripts, PowerPoint slides, participant handouts, and training video clips for supporting early care and education providers who work with children birth - 2 years old and their families. They can be downloaded for free at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel/inftodd.html

586. Comment Requests from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services - April 6, 2009

On April 6, 2009, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) published the following comment requests in the Federal Register:

587. Grant Notice - Secondary Analyses of Data on Child Care

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources, Administration for Children and Families - April 1, 2009

The Administration for Children and Families has issued a notice for Secondary Analyses of Data on Child Care grants for supporting secondary analyses of existing data to answer questions of relevance for policy decision-making on child care and child care subsidies in the United States, US Territories and Tribes.

Due Date for Letter of Intent: 05/01/2009
Due Date for Applications: 06/15/2009
URL: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/closed/HHS-2009-ACF-OPRE-YE-0080.html

588. Request for Comments - Part B, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Implementation of FAPE Requirements.

Source: U.S. Department of Education - March 24, 2009

On March 24, 2009, the U.S. Department of Education published a 30-day Federal Register Notice inviting comments on Part B, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Implementation of FAPE Requirements. The information collection package can be accessed at http://edicsweb.ed.gov/browse/browsecoll.cfm?pkg_serial_num=3427. It includes instructions for reporting on the educational environments of children with disabilities ages 3-5 by discrete age.

Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before April 23, 2009. To view the Federal Register notice go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/2009-1/032409b.html

589. Results Matter Video Series on Early Childhood Assessment

Source: Colorado Department of Education - Retrieved March 18, 2009

The Colorado Department of Education's Results Matter Program has developed a series of videos that help providers better understand ways to use observation, documentation, and assessment to inform practice. Two styles of videos are provided: 1) practitioners discussing and illustrating their exemplary practices; 2) clips for practicing observation, documentation and assessment skills, showing children participating in typical routines and activities. You can watch the videos online or download the free clips for use in educational and professional development activities. Additional clips are will be added periodically. The clips are available at http://www.cde.state.co.us/resultsmatter/RMVideoSeries.htm and include the following:

Focus on Early Care and Education

  • Connecting Learning Opportunities
  • Linking Documentation and Curriculum
  • Sharing Documentation with Families
  • Sharing Video Documentation with Families
  • The Essential Role of Observation and Documentation
  • Using Documentation to Become a Better Teacher
Focus on Early Intervention
  • Using Video for Self-Reflection
  • Using Video to Share with Family Members

590. Evaluation Brief Reviews Recent Study on Professional Development for Head Start Teachers

Source: National Forum on Early Childhood Program Evaluation - March 17, 2009

The National Forum on Early Childhood Program Evaluation has published a new evaluation brief entitled Can Professional Development for Teachers Enhance Language and Literacy Environments for Preschoolers? The brief reviews a recent study which found that Head Start teachers who participated in the intensive Literacy Environment Enrichment Program (LEEP) improved significantly in providing classroom supports for language and literacy development. It is available at http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu/index.php/download_file/-/view/77/

591. New Resources on Using Recovery Funds for Services to Children

Source: U.S. Department of Education, CEC, CLASP, and ZERO TO THREE - March 7, 2009

The following new resources on using recovery funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) for services to children, including children with disabilities and their families, are available online:

The U.S. Department of Education has released a new fact sheet related to the use of IDEA recovery funds under ARRA, which will provide an unprecedented opportunity for states, LEAs, and early intervention service providers to implement innovative strategies to improve outcomes for infants, toddlers, children, and youths with disabilities while stimulating the economy. It is available at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/leg/recovery/factsheet/idea.html. The Department hopes to have a fact sheet related to IDEA Part C recovery funds completed soon and will publish all updates at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/leg/recovery/index.html

The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) has published Questions & Answers: How the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Impacts Special Education and Early Intervention, which summarizes the portions of ARRA that CEC believes will be of particular interest to professionals who work on behalf of students with disabilities and/or gifts and talents. It is available at http://www.cec.sped.org/Content/NavigationMenu/PolicyAdvocacy/CECPolicyResources/EconomicStimulus/Stimulus_Q_A.htm

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) has published a new Web page and series of publications on Reinvesting in Child Care that includes publications and policy recommendations related to effectively using economic recovery funds to benefit young children and their families. It is available at http://www.clasp.org/issues/topic?type=child_care_and_early_education&topic=0015

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center is hosting a conference call on March 18, 2009 at 1:30 pm EST. The call will discuss tools that can help states plan their use of economic stimulus funds to benefit infants, toddlers, and their families. To learn more go to http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/Conference_Call_Posting.pdf?docID=7781

592. Online Discussion Today! Maximizing Resources from the Stimulus Package

Source: National Professional Development Center on Inclusion - March 6, 2009

Today (March 6, 2009) the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPDCI) and Ann Mitchell, former President of NAEYC, are hosting an all-day online discussion on how states can use new monies in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to advance a state Quality Rating Improvement System. No registration is required and you can join the discussion at anytime by going to http://community.fpg.unc.edu/discussions/blog-speaking-of-inclusion/maximizing-resources-from-the-stimulus-package [Note: This item is no longer available online.]

In addition, NPDCI has released a new paper, entitled Why Program Quality Matters for Early Childhood Inclusion: Recommendations for Professional Development, which advocates for the need to link early childhood program quality and professional development, with a particular focus on how this topic relates to early childhood inclusion. It is available online at http://npdci.fpg.unc.edu/resources/articles/npdci-quality-paper

593. New Early Childhood Publications from the Center for Law and Social Policy

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - March 4, 2009

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) recently published the following new publications related to early childhood care and development:

  • Comprehensive Services: Research-Based Rationale, by Elizabeth Hoffmann - http://s242739747.onlinehome.us/publications/cp_rationale12.pdf - As part of the Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project, this rationale presents research on factors that put babies and toddlers at risk for unhealthy development and the benefits of comprehensive health, mental health, and family support services. It also examines how state policies can improve care for babies.
  • Providing Information on Infant/Toddler Child Care: Research-Based Rationale, by Hannah Matthews - http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/0461.pdf - As part of the Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project, this rationale presents research on parents' access to information on quality child care and subsidies, as well as barriers faced by low-income, immigrant, and limited English proficient (LEP) families. It also examines how state policies can improve care for babies.
  • CCDBG: What's in the law? - http://s242739747.onlinehome.us/publications/ccdbginbrief.pdf - This brief discusses the federal requirements states must follow in designing their child care programs and spending Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) funds.

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594. New Report on Pre-K Response to Intervention

Source: National Center for Learning Disabilities - Retrieved February 27, 2009

The National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD) has released a new report entitled Roadmap to Pre-K RTI: Applying Response to Intervention in Preschool Settings (2009), by Mary Ruth Coleman, Tracey West, and Froma Roth. The report provides information on key components of Response to Intervention (RTI) frameworks in preschool settings, how they relate to RTI in K-12 settings, examples of early models in the field (CO, DC, FL, IL, KS and MD), and resources for implementation and policy recommendations. It is available online at http://www.rtinetwork.org/images/stories/learn/roadmaptoprekrti.pdf

595. 2nd TACSEI Webinar Recording and Materials Available Online

Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - February 27, 2009

The Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI) recently conducted its second webinar, entitled Using a Response to Intervention (RTI) Framework to Promote Young Children's Social Development: The Teaching Pyramid Model (February, 2009), by Phil Strain, Lise Fox and Judith Carta. The discussion includes an overview of the RtI framework, the use of screening and ongoing assessment with the model, implementation of the Pyramid Model as RtI to address social development and behavior, and a discussion of the benefits and challenges associated with the implementation of RtI in early childhood programs. Materials are available online at http://www.challengingbehavior.org/explore/webinars/2.23.2009_tacsei_webinar.htm

596. Invitation to Participate in Rating of Early Childhood Assessment Measures

Source: Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Early Childhood - February 20, 2009

The Division for Early Childhood (DEC) at the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) invites those who work with young children from birth to age eight to participate in a consumer rating of early childhood assessment measures. For more information go to http://www.dec-sped.org/professionals/professional_opportunities

597. Recording of 1st TACSEI Webinar and Registration for 2nd TACSEI Webinar Available Online

Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - February 12, 2009

The Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI) recently conducted its first webinar titled Implementing and Sustaining Effective Programs and Services that Promote Good Social, Emotional & Behavioral Outcomes for Young Children with Special Needs: Part 1 of 2, presented by Karen Blase, Barbara Smith and Roxane Kaufmann. The recording of this event and all of the accompanying resources are now available online at http://www.challengingbehavior.org/explore/webinars/1.29.2009_tacsei_webinar.htm

TACSEI's second Webinar, entitled Using a Response to Intervention (RTI) Framework to Promote Young Children's Social Competence and Address Challenging Behavior, presented by Phil Strain, Lise Fox and Judith Carta, will take place on February 23, 2009, from 3:30 to 5:00 pm EST. To register for this free webinar go to http://www.challengingbehavior.org/do/tacsei_webinars/using_rti_framework_registration.htm. Space is limited and registrations will no longer be accepted once capacity is reached.

598. Grant Awards Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visitation Programs to Prevent Child Abuse and Neglect

Source: Children's Bureau Express - February 2, 2009

The Children's Bureau recently funded 17 evidence-based home visitation programs to prevent child abuse and neglect. Descriptions of the programs are available online at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/programs_fund/discretionary/2008.htm

599. New Policy Brief on Linking Early Learning and the Early Grades - Lessons from the SPARK Initiative

Source: Education Commission of the States - January 28, 2009

The Education Commission of the States has published a new policy brief entitled, While no one was looking - Community-based solutions to linking early learning and the early grades: Implications for state policy. Lessons from the SPARK Initiative (2009), by Mimi Howard. SPARK (Supporting Partnerships to Assure Ready Kids) is a five-year initiative funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, which works to improve child outcomes by creating more continuity across early childhood and K-12 education. The report is available online at http://www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/79/41/7941.pdf

600. Resources in Spanish on the Child Welfare Information Gateway

Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway - Retrieved January 23, 2009

The Child Welfare Information Gateway recently launched a new Resources in Spanish section on its Web site. It includes a glossary of English-to-Spanish and Spanish-to-English child welfare terms, as well as topically organized resources on: child abuse and neglect; preventing and responding to child abuse and neglect; supporting and preserving families; out-of-home care; and adoption. It is available at http://www.childwelfare.gov/spanish/

601. Early Childhood Funding Opportunities

Source: ED, HHS, NIH, NIDCD - Various December 2008 Dates

The following new early childhood funding opportunities are now available:

TITLE - Foundations for Learning
SPONSOR - United States Department of Education (ED), Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDFS)
SUMMARY - The purpose of this program is to support projects to help eligible children become ready for school.
URL - For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2008-4/122408a.html

TITLE - Young Children With Mild to Severe Hearing Loss (R21)
SPONSOR - Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
SUMMARY - This funding opportunity supports research addressing the needs of infants and young children with mild to severe hearing loss. Development, refinement or modification of measurement tools for young children is also encouraged.
URL - For complete information go to http://fundingopps.cos.com/alerts/109074

TITLE - Child Development Research Fellowship Program
SPONSOR - Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation
SUMMARY - Funds are available for a cooperative agreement to sponsor a Child Development Research Fellowship that will allow child development professionals from the academic community the opportunity to actively participate in policy-relevant research activities associated with sponsor programs.
URL - For complete information go to http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do?oppId=44499&flag2006=false&mode=VIEW

602. New Reports on Child Care and Development Block Grant Participation

Source: Center on Law and Social Policy - Retrieved January 9, 2009

The Center on Law and Social Policy has recently published the following new reports:

603. Assessing Early Developmental Delays in Young Children Entering Foster Care

Source: Children's Bureau Express - December 1, 2008

The most recent issue of the Children's Bureau Express highlights a recent study that evaluated the effectiveness of conducting centralized assessments of young children entering foster care, in order to identify developmental delays. Data collected on 94 children under age 3 entering foster care showed that 57.2 percent of assessed children had probable developmental delays and 98 percent were referred for a formal evaluation. To learn more go to http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=101&articleID=2494&keywords=foster

The complete findings were published in the Children and Youth Services Review, 30(5), under the title Centralized Assessment of Early Developmental Delays in Children in Foster Care: A Program That Works, by Christina M. Bruhn, Denise Duval, and Richard Louderman.

604. New FPG Snapshot on the Accuracy of Young Children's Memories When Being Interviewed

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - December 1, 2008

A study conducted by FPG researcher Jennifer Schaaf provides insights into young children's ability to accurately report the truth when being interviewed in abuse situations. The findings suggest that interviews need to be individualized based on each child's characteristics. A brief synopsis of findings is available in a new FPG Snapshot entitled To Tell the Truth - http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~snapshots/Snap56.pdf.

Full article citation: Schaaf, J. M., Alexander, K. W., & Goodman, G. S. (2008). Children's false memory and true disclosure in the face of repeated questions. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 100(3), 157-185.

605. Workforce Designs: A Policy Blueprint for State Early Childhood Professional Development Systems

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children - Retrieved November 26, 2008

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) has published a new report entitled Workforce Designs: A Policy Blueprint for State Early Childhood Professional Development Systems, by Sarah LeMoine, which looks at policies that support an integrated state professional development system for all early childhood education professionals. It is available online at http://www.naeyc.org/policy/ecwsi#blueprint

A database of state policies organized by the blueprint's six essential policy areas of professional standards, career pathways, articulation, advisory structure, data and financing is being developed. Go to http://208.118.177.216/policy/ecwsi/database.asp

606. Resolution Meetings: Supports and Practices

Source: Project Forum at NASDSE and CADRE - Retrieved November 25, 2008

Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) and the Consortium for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE) have jointly published a new policy analysis entitled Resolution Meetings: Supports and Practices, by Kelly Henderson and Philip Moses. It is based on a survey sent to all special education units of state education agencies and interviews with eight states on the subject of alternate dispute resolution. It is available online at http://www.projectforum.org/docs/ResolutionMeetings-StateSupportsandPractices.pdf

607. Transitions for Children and Youth: How Occupational Therapy Can Help

Source: American Occupational Therapy Association - Retrieved November 21, 2008

The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) recently published a short paper about the role of occupational therapists in supporting families and children with disabilities as they transition between early intervention, preschool, kindergarten, middle school, high school and ultimately, from school to adult life. It is available online at http://www.aota.org/Consumers/WhatisOT/FactSheets/Children/Transitions.aspx

608. Governors Summits on Early Childhood: Raising Awareness and Implementing Plans for Children Birth to Five

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - November 10, 2008

In 2006 and 2007 the National Governors Association Center on Best Practices awarded $10,000 grants to 17 states to host statewide summits on early childhood and draw attention to the needs of very young children. With support from the Buffett Early Childhood Fund and an anonymous donor, the summits are helping Governors convene key stakeholders around state action plans for early childhood development. A new article from the ZERO TO THREE Policy Center highlights the 10 states which received grants in 2007: AK, CT, FL, KS, ME, MI, OR, SD, UT and VA. It is online at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/NGASummit2008.pdf?docID=6601

609. Early Childhood Research & Practice - Fall 2008

Source: Early Childhood Research & Practice - Retrieved November 7, 2008

The Fall 2008 issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice (ECRP) is now available online at http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v10n2/index.html. ECRP is a free Internet-only journal, available in both English and Spanish, which features articles related to the development, care, and education of children from birth to approximately age 8. For more information and to view past issues go to http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/

610. Draft Position Statement on Early Childhood Inclusion - Feedback Requested

Source: National Professional Development Center on Inclusion - October 30, 2008

The National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPDCI) is coordinating a collaborative process to develop a joint position statement on early childhood inclusion by the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). NPDCI is seeking feedback on the draft position statement from diverse national audiences through the use of a seven question survey. The draft statement and survey are available online at http://community.fpg.unc.edu/resources/articles/Early_Childhood_Inclusion.

611. New Article on Effective Communication about Early Childhood Care and Education

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Network - October 13, 2008

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Network publishes a series of articles to help infant-toddler professionals successfully communicate with policymakers and the public about early childhood development. The latest article in this series, entitled Effective Communication about the Early Years: Strategies for Becoming a Better Communicator, is now available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/FramingFive.pdf?docID=6241.

612. New Web Site - Children and Clinical Studies

Source: National Institutes of Health - October 6, 2008

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched a new Web site to help parents and health professionals understand issues related children's medical research. The Web site, Children and Clinical Studies, explains why research in children is important, how studies are conducted, and what measures are taken to protect the safety and privacy of study participants. For more information go to http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/childrenandclinicalstudies/index.php

613. Promoting the Healthy Growth and Development of Infants and Toddlers in Child Care Settings

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - September 30, 2008

The Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project at the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) has published three new research-based rationales, which provide recommendations for states on how to promote the healthy growth and development of infants and toddlers in child care settings:

To learn more about the Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project go to http://www.clasp.org/projects

614. Training Early Intervention Assistants in California's Community Colleges

Source: Regional Educational Laboratory at WestEd - September 22, 2008

The Regional Educational Laboratory at WestEd (REL West) has published a new report entitled Training Early Intervention Assistants in California's Community Colleges. This report examines California's efforts to promote the pre-service preparation of early intervention assistants for infants and toddlers with special needs through a certificate program offered by participating community colleges. To access the report go to http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?projectID=165&productID=114

615. Part C State Performance Plan (SPP) and Annual Performance Report (APR) Information Collection Packet

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education & Rehabilitative Services - August 21, 2008

The Office of Special Education & Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) at the U.S. Department of Education has posted Information Collection Packet 1820-0578, Part C State Performance Plan (SPP) and Annual Performance Report (APR), online at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/capr/index.html. This packet contains both SPP and APR instructions, tables and supporting attachments to be used for February 2009 submission.

616. New Publications on Promoting the Healthy Growth and Development of Infants and Toddlers in Child Care Settings

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - August 25, 2008

The Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project at the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) has published the following three new research-based rationales, which provide recommendations for states on how to promote the healthy growth and development of infants and toddlers in child care settings:

To learn more about the Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project go to http://childcareandearlyed.clasp.org/babiesinchildcare.html

617. The Bright Futures Training Intervention Project: Implementing Systems to Support Preventive and Developmental Services in Practice

Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved August 27, 2008

The Bright Futures initiative provides recommendations to help pediatricians and other early childhood providers improve the quality of preventive and developmental care for young children. An article in the July 2008 issue of Pediatrics describes a pilot project supported by the Commonwealth Fund, which is helping to implement Bright Futures in a wide variety of practices. An abstract of the article is available online at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/122/1/e163

Full citation: Lannon, C. M., Flower, K., Duncan, P., Moore, K. S., Stuart, J., & Bassewitz. J. (2008). The Bright Futures Training Intervention Project: implementing systems to support preventive and developmental services in practice. Pediatrics, 122(1):e163-e171, doi:10.1542/peds.2007-2700

618. Grant Announcement - 2009 Young Scholars Program

Source: The Foundation for Child Development - Retrieved August 22, 2008

The Foundation for Child Development is accepting proposals for its 2009 Young Scholars Program, which supports young scholars conducting research on the development of children in immigrant families from birth to age ten, particularly those who are living in low-income families. Proposals focused on children from birth to age eight are highly encouraged. Proposals must be received on or before Wednesday, November 5, 2008. To learn more go to http://www.fcd-us.org/resources/resources_show.htm?doc_id=693333

619. Demographics of Family, Friend, and Neighbor Child Care in the United States

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - August 22, 2008

The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has published a new brief entitled, Demographics of Family, Friend, and Neighbor Child Care in the United States, by Amy Susman-Stillman and Patti Banghart. The brief summarizes the findings of a literature review on Family, Friend, and Neighbor Child Care and addresses questions such as:

  • What proportion of employed parents use FFN care?
  • Do patterns of FFN use vary by the child's age?
  • Do patterns of FFN use vary by family characteristics, such as income level, ethnicity, and parent work schedule?
  • What are the characteristics of FFN caregivers?
It is available online at http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_835.html

620. July Issue of NASBE's Journal, the State Education Standard, Explores a Pre-K to 3 Vision for Early Learning

Source: National Association of State Boards of Education - Retrieved August 8, 2008

The July 2008 issue of the State Education Standard, the policy journal of the National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE), explores issues related to the topic of early childhood education and improving the connections between early education and the K-3 system. Feature articles include:

The entire issue is available online at http://www.nasbe.org/index.php/pub-archive/journal-archive/45-standard/426-promoting-a-pre-k-to-three-vision-for-early-learning.

621. State and Community Policy Roundup: Progress on Infant-Toddler Issues across the United States

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Network - Retrieved August 8, 2008

A new article from the ZERO TO THREE Policy Network summarizes recent early childhood legislation and initiatives happening across the country and provides updates on the progress states and communities are making in their efforts to serve infants, toddlers and their families. It is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/State_and_Community_Policy_Roundup_July_08.pdf?docID=5741

622. State-by-State Head Start Program Information Report (PIR) Data

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - July 7, 2008

Individual state pages analyzing Head Start PIR data for 2006, which all programs are required to report to the federal government on an annual basis, are now available on the Web site of the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP). Data include information on programs, participants, families, and staff for all Head Start programs in each state, including preschool, Early Head Start, American Indian and Alaskan Native, and Migrant Head Start. To view the state pages go to http://www.clasp.org/publications/headstartpir2006.htm

623. Impact of a Prenatal Substance Abuse Treatment Program on Perinatal Outcomes

Source: MCH Alert - July 11, 2008

Substance abuse during pregnancy results in considerable adverse effects for women and their infants. Kaiser Early Start is a coordinated prenatal substance abuse treatment program that is part of Kaiser Permanente Northern California's (KPNC's) comprehensive prenatal program. A study involving 49,985 women in the KPNG program who completed prenatal substance abuse screening questionnaires between January 1, 1999, and June 30, 2003 shows that integrating substance abuse treatment with prenatal care is cost-effective and significantly decreases negative birth outcomes as well as maternal morbidity. To read a summary of findings go to http://www.mchlibrary.info/alert/2008/alert071108.html#4

Full article citation: Goler, N. C., Armstrong, M. A., Taillac, C. J., et al. (2008). Substance abuse treatment linked with prenatal visits improves perinatal outcomes: A new standard. Journal of Perinatology [published online ahead of print on June 26, 2008 - http://www.nature.com/jp/journal/v28/n9/abs/jp200870a.html]

624. Study Finds Teachers' Interactions with Children Critical Ingredient for Effective Pre-K Programs

Source: University of Virginia - Retrieved June 17, 2008

A new national study finds that pre-kindergarten programs for 4-year-olds are most beneficial when children experience instructionally and emotionally supportive interactions with their teachers. The study involved 2,439 children enrolled in 671 pre-k classrooms in 11 states. To read more about the findings go to http://www.virginia.edu/uvatoday/newsRelease.php?id=5217. A related article has been published in the May/June 2008 issue of Child Development.

Article citation: Mashburn, A., Pianta, R., Hamre, B., Downer, J., Barbarin, O., Bryant, D., Burchinal, D., & Howes, C. (2008). Measures of Classroom Quality in Prekindergarten and Children's Development of Academic, Language, and Social Skills. Child Development, 79(3), 732-749.

625. Fact Sheets on 2006 Data for Head Start and Early Head Start Programs

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - June 18, 2008

The following two new fact sheets from the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) review the 2006 Program Information Report (PIR) data for all Head Start and Early Head Start Programs:

626. Building the Future of Family Involvement

Source: Harvard Family Research Project - Retrieved June 16, 2008

The Spring 2008 issue of the Harvard Family Research Project's Evaluation Exchange newsletter highlights future directions for the family involvement field in research, policy, and practice. It includes articles featuring innovative initiatives, new evaluation approaches and findings, and interviews with field leaders. For more information and to view the issue online go to http://www.hfrp.org/evaluation/the-evaluation-exchange/issue-archive/current-issue-building-the-future-of-family-involvement

627. Webinar - Partnering with the Private and Philanthropic Sectors: A Governor's Guide to Investing in Early Childhood

Source: National Governors' Association Center for Best Practices - May 29, 2008

The National Governors' Association Center for Best Practices (NGO) is hosting a webinar on June 10th from 3:00-4:30 p.m. ET to announce the release of a new report entitled Partnering with the Private and Philanthropic Sectors: A Governor's Guide to Investing in Early Childhood. The webinar will include a panel of presenters highlighting recommendations from the report. It is open to all governors' offices, state policymakers and early childhood organizations.

Registration is required for the web-based portion of the call. To RSVP, please e-mail Cardella Mingo at cmingo@nga.org by 5 p.m. ET on Wednesday, June 4 with the following information: Name, Title & Affiliation, State. No RSVP is necessary to participate in the conference call portion. To join the call please dial 1-866-537-1630 and enter pass code 6259961#.

628. State Initiatives to Expand Access to Early Head Start

Source: ZERO TO THREE and the Center for Law and Social Policy - April 29, 2008

Although the federal Early Head Start (EHS) program has been shown to benefit low-income young children and their families, less than 3 percent of eligible infants and toddlers are currently being reached. A new report published by ZERO TO THREE and the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) examines state efforts to enhance access to EHS services. Building on the Promise: State Initiatives to Expand Access to Early Head Start for Young Children and their Families, by Rachel Schumacher and Elizabeth DiLauro, can be accessed at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/Building_on_the_Promise_April_2008.pdf?docID=5281. A summary is available at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/StateEHSarticle.pdf?docID=5301

629. Children's Budget 2008

Source: First Focus - April 23, 2008

A new publication by First Focus, a bipartisan children's advocacy organization, entitled Children's Budget 2008 provides information on 180 different children's programs funded by the federal government, from child health and education to child welfare and juvenile justice. It was funded with support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and is meant to be a resource for advocates, policymakers, and program administrators. For more information and to access the guide online go to http://www.firstfocus.net/pages/3391/

630. Fourteen States Selected to Participate in the National Early Childhood Symposium

Source: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices - April 4, 2008

As part of an effort to build states' capacity for developing science-based policies that enhance children's learning, behavior and health, 14 states have been selected to participate in the "National Symposium on Early Childhood Science and Policy." The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center), the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University and the National Conference of State Legislatures, which comprise the Partnership for Early Childhood Science and Policy, will jointly convene the symposium, to be held at Harvard June 26-27, 2008. For more information go to http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu/content/downloads/state-teams-selected.pdf

To learn more about the Partnership for Early Childhood Science and Policy go to http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu/content/policy.html

631. LRE Decision Making - Last Module in the Building the Legacy Training Curriculum on IDEA 2004

Source: National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities - April 6, 2008

The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY) recently announced the last training module in its Building the Legacy Training Curriculum on IDEA 2004. Module 15: LRE Decision Making completes the curriculum. It includes information on IDEA's provisions regarding least restrictive environment (LRE), a PowerPoint slideshow for training others on LRE, and participant handouts. It is available at http://www.nichcy.org/training/contents.asp#IEP15

632. Electronic Media and Young Children's Learning

Source: The Future of Children - Retrieved April 11, 2008

An article in the Spring 2008 issue of The Future of Children entitled Media and Young Children's Learning, by Heather L. Kirkorian, Ellen A. Wartella, and Daniel R. Anderson, examines how early media exposure influences cognitive development and academic achievement. One focus of this article is the effect of television on children under age two. It is available online at http://www.futureofchildren.org/information2826/information_show.htm?doc_id=675354.

The entire journal issue, entitled Children and Electronic Media, is available at http://www.futureofchildren.org/pubs-info2825/pubs-info_show.htm?doc_id=674322

633. Children's Bureau Express - Special Section on Child Abuse and Neglect

Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway - April 3, 2008

April is Child Abuse Prevention month and the latest issue of the Children's Bureau Express dedicates an entire section to this topic. It is available at http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewSection&issueID=93&subsectionID=9 and includes the following news items:

  • April Is Child Abuse Prevention Month
  • HHS Releases National Statistics on Child Abuse and Neglect for 2006 - Child Maltreatment 2006
  • What Makes Parent Training Effective?
  • How Children's Hospitals Help Prevent Child Abuse
  • New Studies Show Effectiveness of Parent-Led Prevention Programs
  • The Importance of Family Strengthening
  • Supporting Early Care and Education Programs to Prevent Child Maltreatment
  • The Costs of Child Abuse and Neglect

634. Update - Improving the Delivery of Health Care that Supports Young Children's Healthy Mental Development

Source: Commonwealth Fund - Retrieved March 28, 2008

A new Commonwealth Fund report entitled Improving the Delivery of Health Care that Supports Young Children's Healthy Mental Development: Update on Accomplishments and Lessons from a Five-State Consortium by Neva Kaye and Jill Rosenthal discusses lessons learned from the second Assuring Better Child Health and Development (ABCD II) Consortium, which gave five states an opportunity to develop and test strategies for improving the delivery of developmental services to young children at risk for or with social or emotional development delays, especially those in need of preventive or early intervention services. The report is available online at http://www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/publications_show.htm?doc_id=670975

635. Children's Active Participation in Reading and Storytelling Can Enhance Early Literacy Learning

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - March 6, 2008

A new CELLnote from the Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) entitled Children's Active Participation in Reading and Storytelling Can Enhance Early Literacy Learning by Carol Trivette and Carl Dunst is now available online at http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpapers/cellnotes_v1_n2.pdf. CELLnotes are non-technical, user-friendly summaries of practice-based research syntheses.

636. New FPG Snapshot - Technology Stereotypes Broken When Childrens Health Involved

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - March 3, 2008

A new FPG Snapshot summarizes the results of a study looking at Internet use among mothers of children with genetic disorders. Findings demonstrated that 69 percent of mothers with family incomes less than $30,000 per year and 66 percent of mothers with a high school degree or less turned to the Internet as a major resource for information about diagnosis, prognosis, treatments, services, and supports. The Snapshot is available at http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~snapshots/snap52.pdf

The full findings were published in the following article: Schaffer, R., Kuczynski, K., & Skinner, D. (2008). Producing genetic knowledge and citizenship through the Internet: Mothers, pediatric genetics, and cybermedicine. Sociology of Health & Illness, 30,(1), 145-159.

637. Diversity and School Readiness Resources Available on the Build Web Site

Source: Build Initiative - Retrieved February 25, 2008

In December 2007, the Build Initiative hosted a meeting on Diversity and School Readiness. The meeting was funded by the Heinz Endowments and the Annie E. Casey Foundation with support and participation from the National Black Child Development Institute and the National Council of La Raza. Background reading materials are now available online and include resources on the following topics: (1) framing issues and marketing strategies for equity and diversity in early childhood; (2) building cultural competence in child development practices and early learning standards; (3) building a diverse and culturally competent early childhood workforce; and (4) sharing power and expertise. To access the full collection go to http://www.buildinitiative.org/content/diversity-and-equity

638. Old-Fashioned Play Builds Serious Skills

Source: National Institute for Early Education Research - February 20, 2008

On February 21, 2008 NPR's Morning Edition looked at how certain kinds of play can help young children learn important self-regulation skills. Research fellows at the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER), Elena Bodrova and Deborah Leong, joined the discussion. To listen to the show and to read a related article online go to http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=19212514

639. New IDEA Training Module: Options for Dispute Resolution

Source: National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities - February 20, 2008

The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY) has published a new module for its Building the Legacy Training Curriculum on IDEA. Module 18: Options for Dispute Resolution provides information on IDEA's procedural safeguards and dispute resolution options (one of which is new) for resolving disagreements that may arise between parents of children with disabilities and school districts providing special education and related services to their children. It includes PowerPoint slide shows to use in training sessions, a discussion of IDEA for trainers, and handouts for participants. It is available online at http://www.nichcy.org/Laws/IDEA/Pages/BuildingTheLegacy.aspx#ThemeE

640. New Research on the Effects of Home and Preschool Experiences on Educational Attainment

Source: Journal of Social Science - Retrieved February 15, 2008

A new study published in the March 2008 issue of the Journal of Social Science examines the influence of certain aspects of home and preschool variables on children's literacy and numeracy achievement at school entry and at the end of the 3rd year of school. The results suggest that while family factors such as parents' education and socioeconomic status are important, the home learning environment (HLE) exerts a greater and independent influence on educational attainment. The HLE was only moderately associated with SES and parents' educational levels. The report also suggests that specific preschool experiences matter, particularly when the preschool center works closely with parents. For more information go to http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/resolve/doi?DOI=10.1111/j.1540-4560.2008.00550.x

Full citation: Melhuish, E., Phan, M., Sylva, K., Sammons, P., Siraj-Blatchford, I., & Taggart, B. (2008). Effects of the Home Learning Environment and Preschool Center Experience upon Literacy and Numeracy Development in Early Primary School. Journal of Social Issues, 64(1) , 95-114. doi:10.1111/j.1540-4560.2008.00550.x

641. FPG Snapshot: How Does Fragile X Syndrome Affect Speech and Language Skills?

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - January 30, 2008

A new FPG snapshot entitled How Does Fragile X Syndrome Affect Speech and Language Skills? summarizes information presented in several journal articles by FPG researchers exploring different facets of communication in boys with Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), boys with FXS and autism, boys with Down syndrome, and boys developing typically. It is available online at http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~snapshots/snap51.pdf

642. Recent Publications on Child Care and Early Head Start Programs

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - January 9, 2008

The Center for Law and Social Policy recently released the following publications related to child care and Early Head Start programs:

643. New Briefs on Child Care and Early Education from the Center for Law and Social Policy

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - December 20, 2007

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) has recently published the follow

644. Common Vision, Different Paths: Five States' Journeys toward Comprehensive Prenatal-to-Five Systems

Source: ZERO TO THREE

ZERO TO THREE and Pre-K Now are releasing a joint report, Common Vision, Different Paths: Five States' Journeys toward Comprehensive Prenatal-to-Five Systems. This new report articulates a common vision for early childhood systems in which programs work together to provide high-quality early learning and comprehensive services. Common Vision reveals lessons learned from five states' unique journeys toward such prenatal-to-five systems and identifies four cornerstones that have helped states succeed in this work. Advocates and policymakers will find guidance on how to build on the momentum around individual programs for the larger push toward systems that will benefit all young children and families.

A diverse group of funders worked together to support this publication in an effort to raise policymakers' awareness of early childhood issues, including: the Buffett Early Childhood Fund; the Annie E. Casey Foundation; the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; the David and Lucile Packard Foundation; and The Pew Charitable Trusts.

Electronic copies of the press release and the report itself are attached. The report is also available on the ZERO TO THREE website at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/Common_Vision__Different_Paths_Final.pdf?docID=4521&JServSessionIdr004=y06r02z726.app13b or on the Pre-K Now website at www.preknow.org/documents/CommonVision_Dec2007.pdf. To request printed copies, e-mail Kimberly Lagomarsino at klagomarsino@zerotothree.org or Tina Trenkner at ttrenkner@preknow.org.

645. The Family: America's Smallest School

Source: ETS Policy Information Center

If the United States is to reach our ambitious national education goals, we need to focus as much attention on the starting line as we do on the finish line. While most reform debate centers on improving schools, increasing teaching quality and raising student achievement, success also requires changes within America's smallest school as well: the family.

In the ETS Policy Information Center's new report, The Family: America's Smallest School, ETS researchers Paul E. Barton and Richard J. Coley outline the family and home conditions affecting children's cognitive development and school achievement and how gaps beginning early persist throughout life. With a preface and endorsement by Marc H. Morial, President of the National Urban League, both organizations call on leaders and policymakers to improve not only schools, but also home and family conditions, to help all students succeed.

Critical factors examined in the report include child care quality, parental involvement in schools, parent/pupil ratio, family finances, literacy development, student absences and physical home environments.

Report findings are available for download:

646. President Bush Signs "Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007" Into Law

Source: Office of the White House Press Secretary

Today I signed into law the "Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007," a bill to reauthorize Head Start. Over the past 40 years, Head Start has provided comprehensive child-development services to more than 20 million low-income children and their families to promote school readiness. Because of the National Reporting System, we know that more Head Start programs are helping children gain early reading and math skills. But we must take steps to improve Head Start to ensure that low-income children arrive at school ready to learn.

I am pleased that this bill addresses several longstanding Administration priorities, such as increased competition among Head Start providers, improved coordination of early childhood delivery systems, and stronger educational performance standards. Increasing competition for providers will help ensure that we offer the highest quality programs to our nation's most vulnerable young children. Greater collaboration among Head Start agencies, schools, and other programs serving young children, will help ensure our investments are better aligned and more effective. Stronger educational performance standards and an emphasis on research-based curricula and classroom practices will increase children's preparedness for school. I also support the bill's provisions to strengthen fiscal accountability and program oversight, so that dollars intended to serve children are spent wisely.

I am, however, deeply disappointed that the bill ends the National Reporting System, our only tool to examine consistently how Head Start children are performing in programs across the nation. We should be working to provide more and better data to parents, teachers, and policymakers, not less. I am concerned that the bill authorizes spending levels higher than those proposed in my budget. Approval of this legislation is not an endorsement of these funding levels or a commitment to request them. I am also disappointed that the bill fails to include my proposal to protect faith-based organizations' religious hiring autonomy.

I thank Members of both parties in Congress who worked on this legislation. I will continue to work with Congress to ensure that our neediest children are prepared for success in school and a lifetime of achievement.

http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2007/12/20071212-3.html

647. Who are America's Poor Children? The Official Story

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - November 21, 2007

A new report from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), entitled Who are America's Poor Children? The Official Story by Sarah Fass and Nancy K. Cauthen, states that close to 13 million children in the U.S. live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level, which is $20,650 a year for a family of four. There are 1.2 million more children living in poverty today than in 2000, an increase of 11 percent. Black, Latino, and American Indian children are disproportionately poor, while white children comprise the largest group of poor children. 20% of children under age 6 live in poor families. To read the full report go to http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_787.html

648. New Research Findings - Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Characterized by a Delay in Cortical Maturation

Source: National Institute of Mental Health - November 12, 2007

Findings from a recent study by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) showed that in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the brain matures in a normal pattern but is delayed an average of 3 years and as many as 5 years in some regions, compared to children without the disorder. The delay was most prominent in areas of the frontal cortex that support the ability to suppress inappropriate actions and thoughts, focus attention, remember things from moment to moment, work for reward, and control movement. "Finding a normal pattern of cortex maturation, albeit delayed, in children with ADHD should be reassuring to families and could help to explain why many youth eventually seem to grow out of the disorder," explained Philip Shaw, M.D., NIMH Child Psychiatry Branch, who led research team. To read the full press release go to http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/nov2007/nimh-12.htm.

Citation information: Shaw, P., Eckstrand, K., Sharp, W., Blumenthal, J., et al. (2007). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is characterized by a delay in cortical maturation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Published online before print November 16, 2007, at http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0707741104v1

649. NGA Webcast - Improving Educational Outcomes for Children in Foster Care: What States Can Do

Source: National Governors Association - November 2, 2007

The National Governors Association (NGA) Center, in partnership with Casey Family Programs, is hosting a series of webcasts on improving outcomes for children and youth in the child welfare system. On November 2, 2007 experts discussed the problem of poor educational outcomes for children in foster care and what states, and governors in particular, can do to improve these outcomes. To view the webcast online see Improving Educational Outcomes for Children in Foster Care: What States Can Do.

650. Governors' Summits on Early Childhood: Closing the Achievement Gap for Children Birth to Five

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center and National Governors Association Center on Best Practices - October 29, 2007

In 2006 and 2007 the National Governors Association Center on Best Practices (NGA Center) awarded $10,000 grants to 17 states for the purpose of hosting statewide summits on early childhood to raise awareness about the needs of their youngest children. This article from the ZERO TO THREE Policy Center highlights the summits that were funded in 2006 and discusses what is expected at upcoming summits. It is available at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/NGASummit.pdf?docID=4381

On a related note, the Fall 2007 issue of the NGA Center's Bright Futures Newsletter includes profiles of a number of governors who recently received Early Childhood Summit grants. To learn more go to http://www.nga.org/Files/pdf/0710BRIGHTFUTURESNEWS.pdf

651. Comments on Proposed Revision to 618 Data Reporting Requirements for Preschool LRE Settings

Source: Division for Early Childhood and National Down Syndrome Society - October 22, 2007

The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) published a Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests in the Federal Register on August 16, 2007 for IDEA Part B, 618 Educational Environments (Preschool LRE). Interested participants were invited to submit comments on or before October 15, 2007. Below are links to comments submitted by the Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children (DEC) and the National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS)

652. Grant Notice - Multi-Year Individualized Education Program (IEP) Demonstration Program

Source: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education - October 12, 2007

The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) has published a notice in the Federal Register announcing the availability of applications for a Multi-Year IEP Demonstration Program. OSERS will select up to 15 States to participate in a single one-time only pilot program that will focus on the development of comprehensive multi-year IEPs and the national need to reduce the paperwork burden associated with IEPs while preserving students' civil rights and promoting academic achievement.
Applications Available: October 12, 2007.
Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: February 11, 2008.
For more complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2007-4/101207f.html

653. Grant Notice - Individuals With Disabilities Education Act Paperwork Waiver Demonstration Program

Source: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education - October 12, 2007

The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) has announced the availability of applications for the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act Paperwork Waiver Demonstration Program. OSERS will select up to 15 States to participate in a single, one-time only pilot program to create opportunities to reduce paperwork burdens and other administrative duties in order to increase time for instruction and other activities, while preserving students' civil rights and promoting improved educational and functional results for children with disabilities.
Applications Available: October 12, 2007.
Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: February 11, 2008.
For more complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2007-4/101207g.html

654. Effective Educational Programs for Young Children: What We Need to Know

Source: Child Development Perspectives - October 12, 2007

The inaugural issue of Child Development Perspectives, a new journal from the Society for Research in Child Development, includes an article entitled Effective Educational Programs for Young Children: What We Need to Know, by Ruby Takanishi and Kimber L. Bogard. The authors review what is currently known and what needs to be determined about factors that contribute to positive outcomes from early education programs. It is available online at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118492258/issue

655. State Child Care Assistance Policies 2007

Source: National Women's Law Center - September 24, 2007

The National Women's Law Center (NWLC) recently released its annual analysis of state child care policies, finding that despite some progress in the last year, most states are behind where they were in 2001 and fall short in providing low-income families with the assistance they need to access good quality child care for their children. Without assistance, these families risk losing their jobs and their children risk losing the opportunity for child care that can help promote learning and development. The analysis found that states are particularly remiss in compensating providers who serve low-income children. To read the full press release go to http://www.nwlc.org/details.cfm?id=3129&section=newsroom. To view the analysis go to http://www.nwlc.org/pdf/StateChildCareAssistancePoliciesReport07Web.pdf

656. Healthy Steps for Young Children: Sustained Results at 5.5 Years

Source: Commonwealth Fund - September 12, 2007

Healthy Steps for Young Children was a clinical trial supported by the Commonwealth Fund that incorporated developmental specialists and enhanced developmental services into pediatric care during the first 3 years of life. A total of 5565 children were enrolled at birth and followed through 5.5 years. Results showed benefits in terms of quality of care for families and positive parenting behaviors more than two years post intervention, according to an article published in the September issue of Pediatrics. An abstract is available online at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/120/3/e658

Full article citation: Minkovitz, C., Strobino, D., Mistry, K., Scharfstein, D., Grason, H., Hou, W., Ialongo, N., & Guyer, B. (2007). Healthy Steps for Young Children: Sustained Results at 5.5 Years. Pediatrics, 120(3), e658-e668.

657. The Future of Children - Reducing Poverty through Preschool Interventions

Source: The Future of Children - September 20, 2007

The most recent issue of the Future of Children focuses on eight policy proposals for reducing poverty in the U.S. An article entitled Reducing Poverty through Preschool Interventions by Greg Duncan, Jens Ludwig, and Katherine Magnuson, discusses how high-quality care for disadvantaged preschool children can help reduce poverty in the long term.
To read this article go to http://www.futureofchildren.org/information2826/information_show.htm?doc_id=522136
The full journal issue is available at http://www.futureofchildren.org/pubs-info2825/pubs-info_show.htm?doc_id=521579

658. Requests for Comments from the Institute of Education Sciences

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences - September 12, 2007

The Institute of Education Sciences recently issued invitations to comment on the following:

TITLE: An Impact Evaluation of Early Literacy Programs.
ABSTRACT: The Study will help determine whether early literacy preschool programs have an impact on participating children, and, if so, whether such effects vary among different types of children, families, schools and children's preschool and program experiences. The information will guide decision making in preschool classroom practices and interventions to improve acquisition of early skills and program implementation. The respondents will be preschool children, teachers, paraprofessionals, and parents.
DATES: Comments are due on or before October 12, 2007.
URL: For more information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/2007-3/091207a.html

TITLE: Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), Kindergarten Year Delayed Entry and Repeaters.
ABSTRACT: The ECLS-B is part of a longitudinal studies program. The ECLS-B is designed to follow a national representative sample of children born in 2001 from nine months of age through kindergarten. The cohort has already been seen at nine months and at two years. The current effort is directed towards seeing them in their kindergarten year. The children turned five in 2006, and while the majority of these children were in kindergarten year in 2006, some of them are repeating kindergarten and some were delayed entering kindergarten. It is these children, who either are repeating kindergarten or were delayed entering kindergarten, who are being contacted in this data collection.
DATES: Comments are due on or before October 12, 2007.
URL:For more information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/2007-3/091207b.html

659. New FPG Snapshot - Caregiver Well-Being Affects Academic Achievement

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - September 4, 2007

A recent study by the FPG Child Development Institute looked at the family and social environments of 501 children enrolled in public publicly funded pre-kindergarten in five states and examined how these factors influenced the children's academic achievement. To read a brief summary of the findings, go to http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~snapshots/snap48.pdf

Full article citation: Barbarin, O., Bryant, D., McCandies, T., Burchinal, M., Early, D., Clifford, R., Pianta, R., & Howes, C. (2006). Children enrolled in public pre-k: The relation of family life, neighborhood quality, and socio-economic resources to early competence. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 76(2), 265-276.

660. Request for Comments - Preschool LRE Data Collection

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services - August 20, 2007

The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) published a "Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests" in the Federal Register on August 16, 2007 for IDEA Part B, 618 Educational Environments (Preschool LRE). Interested participants are invited to submit comments on or before October 15, 2007. The complete package is available at http://edicsweb.ed.gov/browse/browsecoll.cfm?pkg_serial_num=3427

The Federal Register Notice is available at http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/2007-3/081607a.html

661. Early Childhood Research & Practice - Articles on Early Learning Standards

Source: Early Childhood Research & Practice - Retrieved August 15, 2007

The latest issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice (ECRP) features the following two articles related to early learning standards:

  • Early Learning Standards: Results from a National Survey to Document Trends in State-Level Policies and Practices (2007), by Catherine Scott-Little, Jim Lesko, Jana Martella, & Penny Milburn - http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v9n1/little.html
  • It's More Than Content: Expanding the Conception of Early Learning Standards (2007), by Christopher P. Brown - http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v9n1/brown.html
All articles in this journal are available in both English and Spanish.

662. Research Findings: Children Who Complete Intensive Early Childhood Program Show Gains into Adulthood

Source: National Institutes of Health - August 7, 2007

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently highlighted the results of a 19 year follow-up study that looked at the long-term effects of the Child-Parent Center (CPC) program. The CPC program provided intensive instruction from pre-school through 3rd grade for children and job skills training, parenting skills training, educational classes and social services for their parents. Findings provide evidence that early education programs can have a wide range of positive effects into adulthood. To read the full press release go to http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/aug2007/nichd-07.htm

Full article citation: Reynolds, A. J., Temple, J. A., Ou, S.-R., Robertson, D. L., Mersky, J. P., and Topitzes, J. W. (2007). Effects of a school-based, early childhood intervention on adult health and well-being: A 19-year follow-up of low-income families. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 161(8), 730-739. The abstract is available at http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/161/8/730

663. Analysis of the Benefits and Costs of Head Start

Source: Society for Research in Child Development - July 27, 2007

The current issue of Social Policy Report includes a cost-benefit analysis of Head Start's impacts on participating children and on society as a whole by researchers Jens Ludwig of the University of Chicago and Deborah Phillips of Georgetown University. Commentaries from Thomas D. Cook and Vivian C. Wong of Northwestern University and Steve Barnett, Director of the National Institute on Early Education Research (NIEER) are included. It is available online at http://www.srcd.org/documents/publications/spr/21-3_early_childhood_education.pdf

664. Early Intervention and Recovery Among Children With Failure to Thrive: Follow-up at Age 8

Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved July 23, 2007

The results of a study examining the impact of early intervention provided to infants with failure to thrive on growth, academic/cognitive performance, and home/classroom behavior at age 8 was published in the July issue of Pediatrics. Findings demonstrated that clinical intervention and home visiting programs lessoned some of the negative effects of failure to thrive. An abstract with more information is available online at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/120/1/59?etoc

Article citation: Black MM, Dubowitz H, Krishnakumar A, et al. 2007. Early intervention and recovery among children with Failure to Thrive: Follow-up at age 8. Pediatrics, 120(1):59-69.

665. Recently Updated - Spanish Early Literacy Parent-Child Activity Materials

Source: Washington Learning Systems - July 17, 2007

The Spanish version of Supporting Early Literacy in Natural Environments: Activities for Caregivers and Young Children has recently been updated. It includes forty-six home and community activities designed to address the three key skills of 1) language development, 2) phonological awareness, and 3) general print awareness. The activities are appropriate for children with disabilities as well as children who are developing typically. To learn more go to http://www.walearning.com/parent-tools/

666. New Training Modules on IDEA 2004

Source: NICHCY - July 12, 2007

The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY) recently posted the following two new training modules online for the Building the Legacy Training Curriculum on IDEA 2004:

Materials for each module include: a PowerPoint presentation for use in training, detailed background text and explanation for trainers, handouts for participants, and supplemental resources for trainers.

667. Strengthening Policies to Support Children, Youth, and Families Who Experience Trauma

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - July 2007

Trauma exposure is pervasive among children in the United States, particularly children involved in the mental health, child welfare, and juvenile justice systems. A new report from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), Strengthening Policies to Support Children, Youth, and Families Who Experience Trauma by Janice L. Cooper, Rachel Masi, Sarah Dababnah, Yumiko Aratani, and Jane Knitzer, reviews current policies and practices to support children exposed to trauma and documents critical considerations in strengthening policies to support care delivery systems that are trauma-informed, prevention oriented, and focused on improving mental health functioning for children, youth, and their families. It is available online at http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_737.html. A companion fact sheet is available at http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_746.html.

668. New Study Shows Half Of Children With Autism Can Be Accurately Diagnosed At Close To One Year Of Age

Source: Kennedy Krieger Institute - July 2, 2007

According to the results of a recent study by the Kennedy Krieger Institute, close to half of children with autism can be diagnosed by about 14 months of age. Some early warning signs include: difficulty initiating communication with others; reduced variety of sounds, words and gestures used to communicate; atypical play patterns; failure to respond to the cues of others; and compromised ability to share experiences with others. To read the full article go to http://www.kennedykrieger.org/kki_news.jsp?pid=6521

669. Methamphetamine and Child Maltreatment

Source: Virginia Child Protection Newsletter - Retrieved July 3, 2007

The Spring 2007 edition of the Virginia Child Protection Newsletter contains an article entitled Methamphetamine and Child Maltreatment, which summarizes challenges associated with protecting children whose parents are addicted to methamphetamines. Promising practices that practitioners can consider are highlighted. It is available online at http://psychweb.cisat.jmu.edu/graysojh/volume%2079.pdf

670. Building Relationships: Parallels Between Infant-Toddler Development and the Public Policy Process

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - June 25, 2006

This recent article from the ZERO TO THREE Policy Center explores relationship-building in early childhood and in the world of policy and advocacy. It is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/BuildingRelationships.pdf?docID=3641

671. Conference on Improving Young Children's Social and Emotional Development - Materials Available Online

Source: Chapin Hall Center for Children, University of Chicago - June 19, 2007

On May 17, 2007 the Chapin Hall Center for Children hosted a web conference entitled: Charting a Course - School Readiness and Success: Improving Children's Social and Emotional Development. The web conference explored how schools and communities can best support the social and emotional development of young children. To listen to the 60-minute web conference recording and to download related materials go to http://www.about.chapinhall.org/conferences/charting/may2007/presentations.html

672. Framing Early Childhood Development: Recommendations for Infant-Toddler Professionals & Advocates

Source: ZERO TO THREE - June 11, 2007

A new article in the framing series from ZERO TO THREE examines a number of early childhood frames, the impact those frames have on how people think about infant-toddler development, and the consequences for public policy. It is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/Framing4.pdf?docID=3541

673. Supporting Growth and Development of Babies in Child Care: What Does the Research Say?

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - June 8, 2007

A new brief from the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) and ZERO TO THREE outlines research to demonstrate that state policies can promote the quality and continuity of early childhood experiences and positively impact the healthy growth and development of babies and toddlers in child care. It is available online at http://www.clasp.org/publications/supporting_babies.pdf

674. Interview with Early Literacy Expert Susan B. Neuman

Source: Reading Rockets - June 8, 2007

In a recent interview with Reading Rockets, early literacy expert Susan B. Newman argues that just reading often with young children is not enough content is important, too. She discusses her recent publication, A Parent's Guide to Reading with Your Young Child, and offers tips for choosing books. A transcript of the interview is available at http://www.readingrockets.org/articles/15573

675. Developmental Services for Young Children in Foster Care

Source: Children's Bureau Express - June 1, 2007

A recent study looked at the extent to which child welfare and intervention agencies identify and help prevent developmental delays in high-risk young children entering foster care. For a summary of the findings go to http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewSection&issueID=84&sectionID=3

The entire article, entitled "Developmental Services for Young Children in Foster Care: Assessment and Service Delivery," by Aubyn Stahmer, Laurel Leslie, John Landsverk, Jinjin Zhang, and Jennifer Rolls, was published in the Journal of Social Service Research, 33(2), 27-36. It is available for purchase online at http://haworthpress.com/store/ArticleAbstract.asp?ID=99133

676. The Parents as Teachers Program: Its Impact on School Readiness and Later School Achievement

Source: Parents as Teachers National Center - Retrieved May 30, 2007

New research findings demonstrate that participation in the Parents as Teachers program closes the achievement gap between poverty and non-poverty children entering kindergarten, and these positive effects are sustained through third grade. A complete summary of these findings, written by Dr. Edward Zigler and Judy Pfannenstiel, can be downloaded at http://www.parentsasteachers.org/atf/cf/{00812ECA-A71B-4C2C-8FF3-8F16A5742EEA}/Executive Summary of Kind. Rea_singlepgs.pdf

677. New FPG Snapshot - Can Child Care Impact Risk for Depression?

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - May 21, 2007

Children living in poverty often have less than ideal home environments and are at an increased risk for depression in adulthood. Follow-up research from the FPG Child Development Institute's Abecedarian Project found that young adults (21 years of age) who had received high quality, full-time early educational child care from infancy to age five reported fewer symptoms of depression than similar young adults who had not. To read a summary of the findings go to http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~snapshots/snap46.pdf

Full article citation: McLaughlin, A., Campbell, F. A., Pungello, E. P., & Skinner, M. (2007). Early educational child care reduces depressive symptoms in young adults reared in low-income families. Child Development, 78(3), 746-756.

678. Notice of Public Meetings About the Proposed Part C Regulations

Source: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, U.S. Department of Education - May 18, 2007

The Secretary of Education announces plans to hold a series of public meetings to seek comments and suggestions about the proposed Part C regulations. Four public meetings will be held on June 4, 2007, June 6, 2007, June 11, 2007, and June 14, 2007. For complete information on where and when these will take place, and how to participate go to the Federal Register notice at http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/2007-2/051807a.html

679. Grant Notice - National Research and Development Center on Response to Intervention in Early Childhood Special Education

Source: Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education - May 17, 2007

The Institute of Education Sciences' National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) has recently released the following FY 2008 Request for Applications:

680. Implications of Age at Onset of Child Maltreatment

Source: Children's Bureau Express - May 1, 2007

The results of a recent study published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology indicate that children who first experience abuse earlier in life (ages 0-5 years) are at greater risk for psychological problems such as anxiety and depression in adulthood than those who first experience abuse later in life (ages 6-11 years). To read the full abstract go to http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=search.displayRecord&uid=2007-01891-017

Article citation: Kaplow, J., & Widom, C. S. (2007). Age of Onset of Child Maltreatment Predicts Long-Term Mental Health Outcomes. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 116(1), 176-187.

681. New Training Materials on IDEA 2004

Source: NICHCY - April 24, 2007

The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY) recently published the following two new training modules as part of its Building the Legacy Training Curriculum on IDEA 2004:

  • Module 6, Early Intervening Services and Response to Intervention
  • Module 12, The IEP Team: Who is a Member?
Each module includes a PowerPoint slide show to use in training sessions, detailed discussions of IDEA for trainers, and handouts for audience participants. They are available at http://www.nichcy.org/Laws/IDEA/Pages/BuildingTheLegacy.aspx

682. Grant Opportunities - FY 2008 IES Research Requests for Applications Now Available

Source: Institute of Education Sciences - April 6, 2007

The FY 2008 Research Requests for Applications from the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) are now available online. Both the National Center for Special Education Research and the National Center for Education Research are now accepting applications on topics such as Early Childhood Programs and Policies; Early Intervention, Early Childhood Special Education and Assessment Research; Reading, Writing, and Language Development Special Education Research; Serious Behavior Disorders Special Education Research; Individualized Education Programs and Individualized Family Service Plans Research; Autism Spectrum Disorders Research; Response to Intervention Research; and Related Services Special Education Research. Submission deadlines are July 26, 2007 and November 1, 2007.

To view the FY 2008 Special Education Research Request for Applications (84.324A and B) go to http://ies.ed.gov/funding/pdf/2008324.pdf
To view the FY 2008 Education Research Request for Applications (84.305A and B) go to http://ies.ed.gov/funding/pdf/2008305.pdf [see pgs. 33-36 for Early Childhood Programs and Practices]

In addition, the Institute of Education Sciences supports predoctoral and postdoctoral research training programs that are funded through its National Center for Education Research and the National Center for Special Education Research. Complete information is available at http://ies.ed.gov/funding/

683. Early Head Start and Teen Parent Families: Partnerships for Success

Source: CLASP - Retrieved April 3, 2007

Teen parent families often face multiple risks that may be complicated by issues involving disability, abuse, or neglect. This new brief from the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) examines the benefits for teen parents of participating in Early Head Start (EHS) programs and specifically, for those teen parents involved with the child protective services system and for those with disabilities. It is available online at http://www.clasp.org/publications/ehs_teens.pdf

684. Notice of Proposed Priorities - Technical Assistance on Data Collection

Source: Federal Register: March 30, 2007 (Volume 72, Number 61)

On March 30, 2007 the Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services published three proposed funding priorities addressing data collected under Part B and Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as amended (IDEA). Comments on these proposed priorities are requested on or before June 13, 2007. For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/proprule/2007-1/033007d.html.

Note: Of special interest to the Early Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education field is Proposed Priority C - Outcome Measures. This priority is for projects that address the needs of States for technical assistance to improve their capacity to meet Federal data collection requirements in one or both of the following two focus areas:
- The development or enhancement of Part B State systems for collecting, analyzing, and reporting preschool outcome indicator data.
- The development or enhancement of Part C systems for collecting, analyzing, and reporting outcome indicator data.

685. National Summit on America's Children

Source: Speaker of the House Press Release - March 28, 2007

The Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives recently announced the convening of a bipartisan National Summit on America's Children in Washington, DC on Tuesday, May 22, 2007. The purpose of the summit will be to hear from experts in the field of neuroscience and child development and to examine how federal policies can take advantage of and support the most relevant research on how children grow and learn. To learn more go to http://speaker.house.gov/newsroom/pressreleases?id=0124

686. Training Modules from the Building the Legacy Training Curriculum on IDEA 2004

Source: NICHCY - March 30, 2007

The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY) recently announced the first four training modules from its Building the Legacy Training Curriculum on IDEA 2004. Each module includes a PowerPoint presentation to use in training sessions, discussions of IDEA for trainers, and handouts for audience participants. The modules now available for download, use, and sharing include:

  • Introduction to Evaluation
  • Initial Evaluation and Reevaluation
  • Identification of Children with Specific Learning Disabilities
  • Disproportionality and Overrepresentation
They are available at http://www.nichcy.org/training/contents.asp

687. OSEP Letters of Clarification on the Final Regulations of IDEA 2004

Source: OSEP - March 15, 2007

The Director of the Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) recently released copies of four new letters of clarification responding to questions about the final regulations of IDEA 2004. These letters are now available on the NECTAC Web site at http://www.nectac.org/idea/clarfctnltrs.asp. They clarify issues regarding:

  • The right to request an expedited due process hearing; placement during appeals.
  • Parental consent requirements for accessing public benefits or insurance.
  • When a speech/language impairment adversely affects educational performance; making up missed sessions; the continuum of service delivery options.
  • The identification of children with specific learning disabilities - severe discrepancy, RTI, and other models.

688. Materials from National Symposium on Dispute Resolution in Special Education Now Available

Source: CADRE - March 21, 2007

On December 7-9, 2006, the Consortium for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE) convened "On the Road to Agreement ~ IDEA 04 & More: the Fourth National Symposium on Dispute Resolution in Special Education." Presentation materials and other resources from the event are now available online at http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/conf2006/resources.cfm

689. State Infant and Toddler Initiative Profiles

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - March 12, 2007

CLASP's 2006 Starting Off Right report (http://www.clasp.org/publications/startingoffright.htm) described strategies states are using to improve early care and education for infants and toddlers and supports for their families. These new State Infant and Toddler Initiative Profiles provide in-depth information on the state initiatives highlighted in Starting Off Right. Go to http://www.clasp.org/publications/state_infanttoddler_profiles.htm

690. Behavior Policy Makers' Summits - Resources Now Available Online

Source: Center for Evidence-Based Practices: Young Children with Challenging Behavior - March 2, 2007

The Center for Evidence-Based Practices: Young Children with Challenging Behavior has convened annual Summits to bring together individuals who can influence federal and state policy, create a forum for discussion and collaborative action planning, and allow participants to review research findings and collaboratively identify issues and initiatives to improve social and behavioral outcomes for young children. Materials, presentations and summaries of discussions from these Summits (2003, 2004, 2005, and 2006) can now be found on the Center's Web site at http://www.challengingbehavior.org/explore/presentations_workshops.htm

691. Analysis of State Newborn Hearing Screening Rates

Source: Public Health Reports - Retrieved March 2, 2007

The results of a study done to determine whether states with universal newborn hearing screening legislation screened a higher percentage of infants for hearing loss than states without such legislation are described in the March-April 2007 issue of Public Health Reports. To read a full summary of the findings go to http://www.mchlibrary.info/alert/2007/alert030207.html#5

Article full citation:
Green, D. R., Gaffney M., Devine O., et al. (2007). Determining the effect of newborn hearing screening legislation: An analysis of state hearing screening rates. Public Health Reports, 122(2):198-205. Available at http://www.publichealthreports.org/userfiles/122_2/11_PHR122-2_198-205.pdf

692. New FPG Snapshot - Quality of Childcare Affects Language Development

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - March 2, 2007

A study recently published in the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology examines for the first time how the quality of childcare affects the development of specific language components. The study is unique in that participants were demographically homogenous all were white children of dual earner parents who had some level of higher education and were of middle income. To read a brief summary of the findings go to http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~snapshots/snap40.pdf

Full citation:
Vernon-Feagans, L., Hurley, M. M., Yont, K. M., Wamboldt, P. M., & Kolak. A. (2007). Quality of childcare and otitis media: Relationship to children's language during naturalistic interactions at 18, 24, and 36 months. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 28(2).

693. Resources on Child Traumatic Stress

Source: Children's Bureau Express - March 1, 2007

Child traumatic stress, particularly as experienced by children involved in the child welfare system, is the focus of the Winter 2007 issue of the online journal Focal Point. The articles discuss causes and definitions of child traumatic stress, the psychological and physiological effects of multiple traumatic stress experiences, evidence-based treatment strategies, and early intervention as prevention. Focal Point is a publication of the Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health at Portland State University. The entire issue or individual articles are available at http://www.rtc.pdx.edu/pgFPW07TOC.php

694. Spring Teleconferences - Sponsored by the National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center

Source: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center - March 2, 2007

The National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center is sponsoring a series of spring teleconferences. Some of the topics of interest include:

  • The ABCs of Infant Mental Health (May 16, 2007)
  • Taming the Ghosts in the Nursery (June 26, 2007)
  • Supporting Families in Recovery through Infant Mental Health Interventions (July 17, 2007)
For information and to register go to http://aia.berkeley.edu/training/teleconference/teleconference_series.php

695. Grant Notice - Early Childhood Educator Professional Development

Source: Federal Register: February 21, 2007 (Volume 72, Number 34)

Title: Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Program
Agency: U.S. Department of Education
Summary: The purpose of the ECEPD program is to enhance the school readiness of young children, particularly disadvantaged young children, and to prevent them from encountering difficulties once they enter school, by improving the knowledge and skills of early childhood educators who work in communities that have high concentrations of children living in poverty.
Applications Available: February 20, 2007.
Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: April 20, 2007
For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2007-1/022107a.html

696. Largest-Ever Search for Autism Genes Reveals New Clues

Source: National Institutes of Health - February 18, 2007

The largest search for autism genes to date, funded in part by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has discovered new evidence of an association between small variations in the genes and autism. Findings from a study conducted by the Autism Genome Project Consortium, a public-private collaboration of more than 120 scientists and 50 institutions in l9 countries have implicated components of the brain's glutamate chemical messenger system and a previously overlooked site on chromosome 11. The study involved scanning the genomes of the largest cohort of families with Autism Spectrum Disorders to date (1,168 families with at least two affected members). To read the full press release go to http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/feb2007/nimh-18.htm

697. Summary Available - NIDCD Research Workshop on Children with Hearing Loss

Source: NIDCD - Retrieved February 23, 2007

The problem of insufficient healthcare services for infants and young children identified with hearing loss and their families has reached crisis proportion in America. To address this issue the Office on Disability at the Department on Health and Human Services (DHHS) initiated the National Initiative to Close the Gaps in Health Care and Educational Services for Infants and Young Children with Hearing Loss. Based on recent recommendations from this initiative the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders/National Institutes of Health (NIDCD/NIH) held a workshop in December, 2006 entitled Outcomes Research in Children with Hearing Loss. The purpose of the workshop was to determine and prioritize research needs and discuss design considerations unique to outcomes research in children with hearing loss. A summary of the workshop is now available online at http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/funding/programs/hb/outcomes/

698. Article Examines Conjoined Effects of Low Birthweight and Childhood Abuse

Source: MCH Alert - February 23, 2007

The authors of an article published in the February 2007 issue of Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine report on data that describe the conjoined effects of low birth weight (LBW) and childhood abuse on impaired adaptation and illness in adolescence and adulthood. To read a summary of these findings go to http://www.mchlibrary.info/Alert/2007/alert022307.html#4

Article citation:
Nomura Y., & Chemtob C. M. (2007). Conjoined effects of low birth weight and childhood abuse on adaptation and well-being in adolescence and adulthood. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 161(2):186-192.
Abstract available at http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/161/2/186

[Originally published in MCHAlert 2007 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

699. New from the Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL)

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - February 12, 2007

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) recently published the following two new papers online:

  • Framework for Developing Evidence-Based Early Literacy Learning Practices
    http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpapers/cellpapers_v1_n1.pdf
    This article describes a research-to-practice framework for organizing available research evidence and using this evidence to develop literacy learning practice guides and tool kits. The framework described is being used at the Center for Early Literacy Learning for culling research evidence to identify the characteristics of early literacy learning experiences associated with later literacy success.
  • Scaling-Up Early Childhood Intervention Literacy Learning Practices http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpapers/cellpapers_v1_n2.pdf
    This article describes key considerations for scaling up the use of early literacy learning practices with infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with developmental disabilities and delays by early childhood intervention programs and practitioners.

700. CDC Releases New Data on Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - February 8, 2007

On February 8, 2007 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported findings from the first and largest summary of prevalence data from multiple U.S. communities participating in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) surveillance project. The results showed an average of 6.7 children out of 1,000 had an ASD in the six communities assessed in 2000, and an average of 6.6 children out of 1,000 had an ASD in the 14 communities included in the 2002 study. This equals approximately 1 in 150 children in these communities. For more information go to http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/2007/f070208.htm

701. Study Examines the Feasibility of Expanding Mental Health Services for Young Children

Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Retrieved February 12, 2007

The findings of a study published in the February 2007 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry concludes that training mental health staff to provide treatment to infants and preschool children and families in public mental health settings is feasible and leads to an increase in numbers of children served. An abstract of the article is available at http://journals.lww.com/jaacap/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=2007&issue=02000&article=00003&type=abstract

The full citation for the article is:
Knapp PK, Ammen S, Arstein-Kerslake C, et al. 2007. Feasibility of expanding services for very young children in the public mental health setting. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 46(2):152-161.

702. New from ZERO TO THREE

Source: ZERO TO THREE - February 2, 2007

ZERO TO THREE recently published the following new items:

  • Infant/Toddler Specialist Networks: Assuring Quality in Child Care for Babies & Toddlers
    States have used a variety of strategies to improve the quality of infant and toddler childcare, one of which is the creation of Infant/Toddler Specialist Networks. This new article from the ZERO TO THREE Policy Center describes the function of infant/toddler specialist networks, how they are funded, how they are structured within a state, and lessons learned from states who have used them. [Note: Link checked on 5/10/2007 - this document is no longer available online].
  • Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect: Parent-Provider Partnerships in Child Care
    This 10-unit training curriculum is meant to train childcare providers to promote healthy parenting and social-emotional development in young children and reduce child abuse and neglect.

703. New Study Shows Arkansas Better Chance State Preschool Program Improves Language and Math Abilities of Children

Source: NIEER - January 25, 2007

The National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) recently published the results of a new study of the Arkansas Better Chance (ABC) state-funded preschool education program. Researchers collected data on 911 preschool and kindergarten children in the fall of 2005, testing their math, vocabulary and early literacy skills. The study found that:

  • Children attending the Arkansas program at age 4 showed gains in vocabulary that were 31 percent higher than the gains of children without the program, a particularly important outcome because this measure is indicative of general cognitive abilities and predictive of becoming a successful reader.
  • The Arkansas preschool program increased children's gains in math skills by 37 percent compared to children's growth without the program.
  • There was 116 percent increase in growth in print awareness among children enrolled compared to growth of children without the program.
To learn more and to download the full report go to http://nieer.org/docs/index.php?DocID=158

704. New Report on Children's Well-Being from the U.S. Census Bureau

Source: U.S. Census Bureau - January 24, 2007

A new report from U.S. Census Bureau examines children's well-being and their daily activities based on data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). It addresses children's living arrangements and their family's characteristics, early child care experiences, daily interaction with parents, extracurricular activities, academic experience, and parents' educational expectations. For more information and to download the report go to http://www.census.gov/prod/2007pubs/p70-109.pdf

705. Tool for Examining Families' Experiences: The National Survey of Early Childhood Health

Source: Commonwealth Fund - January 19, 2007

Pediatric care providers do not always know what kinds of resources, information, and skills parents of young children need to promote healthy development. To address this issue, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families, and Communities developed the National Survey of Early Childhood Health (NSECH). to examine families' experiences, both with pediatric care and with supporting their children's health at home. The NSECH is meant to answer the following questions regarding child care and development:

  • What are the primary health care issues facing parents today?
  • What concerns do parents have about raising their children?
  • Which developmental and parenting issues do parents want to learn more about?
  • Which issues are already being addressed by medical care providers?
A recently published Commonwealth Fund-supported article outlines the objectives and design of the NSECH. For more details and to download the full article go to http://www.cmwf.org/publications/publications_show.htm?doc_id=428539

706. New FPG Snapshot - Why Young Children Enter Early Intervention Services

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - January 8, 2007

This brief Snapshot from the FPG Child Development Institute provides highlights from a study examining the reasons why infants and toddlers entering Part C early intervention services are eligible. The findings yield important information about children receiving early intervention and have the potential to shape the services states provide and therefore the outcomes that children experience. The Snapshot is available online at http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~images/pdfs/snapshots/snap38.pdf

The full citation for the article this Snapshot summarizes is:
Scarborough, A. A., Hebbeler, K. M., & Spiker, D. (2006). Eligibility characteristics of infants and toddlers entering early intervention services in the United States. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 3(1), 57-64.

707. New FPG Snapshot - Preparing Culturally Competent Early Childhood Teachers

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - January 4, 2007

This Snapshot from the FPG Child Development Institute provides highlights from a study examining how early childhood personnel preparation programs are preparing professionals to develop a much-needed cultural competency. It is available online at http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~images/pdfs/snapshots/snap37.pdf

The full citation for the article this Snapshot summarizes is:
Lim, C. I., & Able-Boone, H. (2005). Diversity competencies within early childhood teacher preparation: Innovative practices and future directions. Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education, 26, 225-238.

708. The Importance of High-Quality Teaching In Preschool

Source: Hoover Institution - Retrieved January 9, 2006

In the first 2007 issue of Education Next, Robert Pianta of the University of Virginia describes the findings of two large-scale studies involving preschool and early-childhood programs. The studies showed that children from low-education households placed in high-quality classrooms with knowledgeable, responsive teachers achieved at the same level as children whose mothers had college degrees. Additionally, children with behavior problems showed adjustment and achievement levels identical to children who had no history of such problems. The key was high-quality teaching, according to Dr. Pianta. To read the full article go to http://www.hoover.org/publications/ednext/4612287.html

709. State Approaches to Serving Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: Project Forum - December 31, 2006

This In-Brief Policy Analysis clarifies terminology and reports findings gathered from a survey of state special education staff. Findings are reported in the following areas: state-level staff time and responsibilities; specific services for Part C eligible children; specific services for students with Asperger Syndrome; types of professional development activities offered; taskforce roles; how states measure outcomes; barriers to providing services to this population; and more. The most mentioned barrier to serving this growing population was the lack of educational professionals with ASD expertise. It is available at http://www.projectforum.org/docs/StateApproachestoServingStudentswithAutismSpectrumDisorders.pdf

710. Initiative to Give Pre-K Teachers Tools for High-Quality Inclusive Classrooms

Source: NIEER - November 30, 2006

The October/November issue of Preschool Matters, a publication of the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER), includes an article about the National Center on High Quality Personnel in Inclusive Early Childhood Settings, a new initiative recently launched at the Frank Porter Graham Institute. Go to http://nieer.org/resources/printnewsletter/OctNov2006.pdf and see page 3.

711. Assistive Technology Program Self-Assessment For Infants and Toddlers

Source: Tots 'n Tech Research Institute - November 30, 2006

The Tots 'n Tech Research Institute (TnT) is conducting a self-assessment for professionals to identify activities occurring in their programs that can support assessment, implementation, evaluation, and system processes with Assistive Technology (AT) with infants and toddlers. For more information and to participate in the assessment go to http://www.asu.edu/clas/tnt/

712. Toys for Children with Special Needs

Source: FCTD - November 28, 2006

The Family Center on Technology and Disability's November newsletter features an interview with Sue Mistrett, director emeritus of the Let's Play! project. It includes a discussion about the impact of play on children with disabilities and resources to assist parents and others in finding the right toys for their children. To read the full article go to http://www.fctd.info/resources/newsletters/displayNewsletter.php?newsletterID=10041

713. Grant Notice: Professional Development Center - Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: Federal Register - November 17, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 222)

The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) has published the following notice inviting applications for new awards FY 2007: Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities - Professional Development Center: Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Applications Available: November 17, 2006.
Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: January 2, 2007.
Deadline for Intergovernmental Review: March 2, 2007.

This priority supports one cooperative agreement for the establishment and operation of a Professional Development Center (Center) to provide training for district or State level professional development providers. Such training must be designed to: Expand the types and levels of services provided to children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and their families; develop and enhance the specialization or expertise of providers who work with children with ASD; and provide information to professionals and families on the effectiveness of services for children with ASD.

For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2006-4/111706c.html

714. From Science to Public Policy: Premature Infants

Source: ZERO TO THREE - October 30, 2006

November is Prematurity Awareness Month. In recognition of this important issue, Zero to Three's latest "From Science to Public Policy" article is devoted to the developmental issues associated with prematurity, the policy implications, and opportunities for advocacy action. It is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/Prematurity_Infants.pdf?docID=1921

715. Two New NECTC Research Briefs - Use of Transition Practices by Public Preschool Teachers and Strategies to Support Transition

Source: NECTC - October 18, 2006

Researchers at the National Early Childhood Transition Center (NECTC) have posted findings from two studies. The first study provides information from a national survey of public preschool teachers on their use of transition practices to support the transition to preschool and the transition to kindergarten. The second study provides information on strategies that were identified via national focus group sessions as those that are successful in supporting the transition process. The Research Briefs describing the findings from these studies are available at http://www.ihdi.uky.edu/nectc/resbriefs.aspx. See Use of Transition Practices by Public Preschool Teachers and Strategies to Support Transition for Children with Special Needs.

716. OSEP's Revised Child Outcomes Reporting Requirement for Part C and Part B/619 Programs: What the Changes Mean for States

Source: Early Childhood Outcomes Center - Retrieved October 6, 2006

A new paper from the Early Childhood Outcomes Center summarizes recent changes made by the Office of Special Education Programs to their reporting requirement for Part C and Part B/619 programs related to child outcomes. The paper also describes the new reporting categories and discusses implications for states in the process of developing their outcomes measurement systems. It is available online at http://ectacenter.org/~pdfs/eco/ECO_New%20requirement%20OSEP_9-7-06.pdf

717. Report on the Teacher Needs Survey from the American Psychological Association

Source: APA - Retrieved September 29, 2006

A recent Teacher Needs Survey administered by the American Psychological Association (APA) received 2334 responses from Pre-K through 12th-grade teachers in 49 States. The respondents indicated that teachers want help with classroom management in areas such as children's safety and dealing with disruptive behaviors. Teachers also want help with promoting critical thinking and motivating children to learn. New teachers, in particular, expressed a strong need for assistance. Respondents also indicated a preference for receiving professional development in the form of in-district workshops with teams of teachers or on-line modules, rather than larger regional workshops. To read the full report go to http://www.apa.org/ed/cpse/tns_execsummary.pdf

718. New PEELS Report - Preschoolers with Disabilities: Characteristics, Services, and Results

Source: NCSER - Retrieved September 21, 2006

The National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) in the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) has released the first major report from the Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS) entitled, Preschoolers with Disabilities: Characteristics, Services, and Results. PEELS includes a nationally representative sample of more than 2900 children who were ages 3 through 5 and receiving preschool special education services in 2003-2004. This report describes characteristics of the participating children and their families, children's school-related readiness and behavior, and characteristics of educational services and providers. Some of the major findings of this report suggest that:

  • Nearly half (46%) of preschoolers with disabilities were identified as having a speech or language impairment as their primary disability, and 28 percent were identified as having a developmental delay as their primary disability.
  • On average, preschoolers with disabilities were nearly 3 years old when they started receiving special education or therapy services from a professional.
  • Of the children with disabilities who had an individualized family service plan (IFSP) before age 3, nearly one-third (31%) had on average a 4.6 month gap between the end of services received through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Part C and the beginning of preschool services.
  • In the areas of emerging literacy, early math proficiency, social behavior, and motor performance, preschoolers with disabilities typically performed within one standard deviation of the population mean. Some variations in performance were evident based on age cohort, disability classification, race/ethnicity, and household income.
This report, as well as a two-pager entitled Preschoolers with Disabilities: A Look at School Readiness Skills, can be accessed at https://www.peels.org/reports.asp

719. Helping Infant-Toddler Professionals Communicate Successfully with Policymakers

Source: ZERO TO THREE - September 18, 2006

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Network recently published the third article in a series of articles focused on effective communication about the early years. These articles are meant to help infant-toddler professionals successfully communicate with policymakers and the public about early childhood development. The latest article, entitled The Elements of the Frame: Visuals, Tone, Metaphors & Simplifying Models, is available at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/framing_article_part_two_final.pdf?docID=1902.

All articles in the series can be found at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/PageServer?pagename=ter_pub_framing.

720. New Issue of the Future of Children - "Opportunity in America"

Source: Center for Research on Child Wellbeing - September 15, 2006

The latest issue of The Future of Children, entitled "Opportunity in America", focuses on the extent to which children's chances of success depend on the circumstances into which they are born. It can be accessed online at http://www.futureofchildren.org/pubs-info2825/pubs-info_show.htm?doc_id=388485.

Of particular interest is an article entitled Early Childhood Development and Social Mobility, by W. Steven Barnett and Clive R. Belfield.

721. Child Care and Development Block Grant Participation in 2005

Source: CLASP - September 7, 2006

The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) provides a block grant to states for child care assistance to help low-income working families. Today the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) published a 2-page fact sheet that provides a summary of CCDBG participation in 2005 and information about the ages of children receiving assistance, the types of child care settings used, and the reasons families receive assistance. It is available online at http://www.clasp.org/publications/ccdbgparticipation_2005.pdf

722. More than Meets the Eye: Head Start Programs, Participants, Families, and Staff in 2005

Source: CLASP - August 25, 2006

This new policy brief from the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) examines the latest data from the Program Information Reports (PIR) that all Head Start programs must submit to the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. In 2005, Head Start served fewer children than in earlier years, however more families accessed an array of services, such as services related to substance abuse, child abuse or neglect, mental health, and English as a Second Language courses. Teacher education levels increased, but salaries remained the same. To read the report go to http://www.clasp.org/publications/hs_brief8.pdf

For data specific to the Early Head Start program, which serves children under age 3 and pregnant women, go to http://www.clasp.org/publications/HS_brief8_2005data.pdf

723. Tips for Parents of Preschoolers in Multiple Languages

Source: Reading Rockets - August 25, 2006

Reading Rockets and Colorn Colorado have recently created one page parent tip sheets on how to help young children become happy, confident readers. The tip sheets are available in English, Spanish, Haitian Creole, Arabic, Russian, Traditional Chinese, Hmong, Vietnamese, Tagalog and Korean. To download free copies and share them in your communities go to http://www.readingrockets.org/article/7833

Reading Rockets is funded by a major grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. Colorn Colorado is a bilingual Web site developed by Reading Rockets for Spanish-speaking parents and educators of English language learners. It is now funded by a grant from the American Federation of Teachers.

724. Early Childhood Teachers Often Ill Prepared to Care for Children with Disabilities

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - August 7, 2006

A majority of preschool classrooms include at least one child with a disability, however teachers are often unprepared to work with these children. A recent survey of early childhood teacher preparation programs showed that even though early intervention and special education are part of many programs' missions, coursework and training often fall short. A new FPG Snapshot about these findings is available at http://www.fpg.unc.edu/%7Eimages/pdfs/snapshots/snap31.pdf

To learn more see the following article:
Chang, F., Early D., & Winton, P. (2005). Early Childhood Teacher Preparation in Special Education at 2- and 4-Year Institutions of Higher Education. Journal of Early Intervention, 27(2), 110-124.

725. From Science to Public Policy: Promoting Policies that Support Early Childhood Social & Emotional Development

Source: The Baby Monitor: ZERO TO THREE - August 7, 2006

A new article in the "From Science to Public Policy" series discusses the importance of supporting healthy social-emotional development in babies and young children and provides strategies for doing this at the state level through public policy. It is available at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/social_emotional_article_final.pdf?docID=1925

The article is based on a research and policy report entitled Helping Young Children Succeed: Strategies to Promote Early Childhood Social and Emotional Development (September 2005), developed jointly by ZERO TO THREE and the National Conference of State Legislatures. Go to http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/helping_young_children_succeed_final.pdf?docID=1725&AddInterest=1157

726. Starting Off Right: Promoting Child Development from Birth in State Early Care and Education Initiatives

Source: New from CLASP - August 3, 2006

A new CLASP document entitled Starting Off Right: Promoting Child Development from Birth in State Early Care and Education Initiatives describes strategies states are using to improve early care and education programs for infants and toddlers, and supports for their families. For more information go to http://www.clasp.org/publications/startingoffright.htm

727. State Policy Roundup: Progress on Infant-Toddler Issues Across the United States

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Network - July 24, 2006

In recent months the ZERO TO THREE Policy Network has been gathering information about new infant-toddler legislation and campaigns taking place in a number of different states across the country. A recently published article provides summaries of these state efforts. It is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/PageServer?pagename=ter_pub_statepolicy_updates

728. Pre-K and Latinos: The Foundation for America's Future

Source: Pre-K Now - July 16, 2006

According to recent U. S. Census data, one in five children under the age of five in the United States is Hispanic. Research shows that these children are less likely than their white peers to start school with the basic math and reading skills needed for academic success. Only 40 percent of Latino children attend preschool, as compared with 60 percent of white and African American children. This new Pre-K Now report provides an overview of some of the obstacles Latino families face in accessing early learning opportunities for their children and offers strategies for increasing Latino participation in pre-k. It is available online at http://www.preknow.org/documents/Pre-KandLatinos_July2006.pdf

729. Birth to 5 and Beyond: A Growing Movement in Early Education

Source: ZERO TO THREE - July 11, 2006

This article examines recent efforts by states and communities to develop comprehensive early education systems that support access to health care, strong families, and positive early learning experiences for young children. It is excerpted from an article of the same title in the July 2006 issue of the ZERO TO THREE Journal. Available at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/Birth_to_5_and_Beyond.pdf?docID=1741

730. Setting the Stage for Success: Implementation of Developmental and Behavioral Screening and Surveillance in Primary Care Practice

Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved July 14, 2006

This article, published in the July issue of Pediatrics, presents strategies for integrating developmental screening into pediatric offices. The strategies are drawn from lessons learned in North Carolina, which has developed a comprehensive system to significantly increase screening rates. For more information go to http://www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/publications_show.htm?doc_id=381569

Complete citation:
Earls, M. R., & Hay, S. S. (2006). Setting the stage for success: Implementation of developmental and behavioral screening and surveillance in primary care practice. Pediatrics, 118(1):e183-e188.

731. Emotional, Developmental, and Behavioral Health of American Children and Their Families: A Report from the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health

Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved June 30, 2006

Recent children's health surveys have documented a high prevalence of emotional, developmental, and behavioral problems among children. Data from the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health provide new insights into these problems and their association with family function and community participation. An article published in the June issue of Pediatrics uses the NSCH data to provide an emotional, developmental, and behavioral health "report card" for children, as well as an in-depth look at associations among developmental problems, family function, and community participation. More information is available at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/117/6/e1202.

Full citation for the article:
Blanchard LT, Gurka MJ, Blackman JA. 2006. Emotional, developmental, and behavioral health of American children and their families: A report from the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health. Pediatrics, 117(6):1202-1212

732. General Supervision Enhancement Grants - Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal Year (FY) 2006

Source: Federal Register: June 23, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 121)

Title: Technical Assistance and Dissemination To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities--General Supervision Enhancement Grants
Agency: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, U.S. Department of Education

Purpose of Program: This program promotes academic achievement and improves results for children with disabilities by supporting technical assistance, model demonstration projects, dissemination of useful information, and implementation activities that are supported by scientifically-based research.

Applications Available: June 23, 2006.
Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: August 7, 2006.
Form complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2006-2/062306b.html

733. The Foundation for Child Development Announces Call for Proposals for 2007 Young Scholars Program

Source: Foundation for Child Development

The Foundation for Child Development (FCD) Young Scholars Program (YSP) focuses on supporting a new generation of scholars interested in conducting research on the development of young children in immigrant families, especially those who are living in low-income families. Proposals that focus on children from birth to age eight are highly encouraged. Eligible scholars must have earned their Ph.D. within the last 15 years. FCD is particularly interested in research that can inform policies regarding the health and education needs of young newcomer children. For complete information go to http://www.fcd-us.org/programs/programs_show.htm?doc_id=447982

734. The Deficit Reduction Act of 2005Opportunities and Challenges for ECCS Initiatives

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - Retrieved June 15, 2006

The Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (DRA) changes to Medicaid affect health access and coverage for children, starting with those ages birth to 5 years. State policymakers and family advocates working to develop Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) and those implementing ECCS plans will need to use their tools and knowledge wisely to ensure a positive impact from the DRA on young children. This first Project THRIVE Short Take highlights opportunities and cautions for states concerning:

  • Eligibility for children with disabilities
  • Family cost sharing
  • Benefits and benchmark plans
  • Case management
  • Proof of citizenship
Available online at http://nccp.org/publications/pub_664.html

735. Grant Notice: Technical Assistance and Dissemination to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities Program

Source: Federal Register: June 8, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 110)

Title: Technical Assistance and Dissemination to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities Program (84.326D)
Issuing Agency: Department of Education

Summary: The Technical Assistance and Dissemination to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities program promotes academic achievement and improves results for children with disabilities by supporting technical assistance, model demonstration projects, dissemination of useful information, and implementation activities that are supported by scientifically-based research. The Personnel Development to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities program: (1) Helps address State-identified needs for highly qualified personnel--in special education, related services, early intervention, and regular education--to work with children with disabilities and (2) ensures that those personnel have the skills and knowledge--derived from practices that have been determined through research and experience to be successful--that are needed to serve those children. The Technology and Media Services for Individuals with Disabilities program (1) improves results for children with disabilities by promoting the development, demonstration, and use of technology, (2) supports educational media services activities designed to be of educational value in the classroom setting to children with disabilities, and (3) provides support for captioning and video description that is appropriate for use in the classroom setting.

Dates: Applications Available: June 8, 2006.
Current Closing Date for Applications July 24, 2006.
To access the complete notice go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2006-2/060806c.html

736. Grant Notice: Personnel Development to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities--Combined Priority for Personnel Preparation

Source: Federal Register: June 5, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 107)

Title: Personnel Development to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities--Combined Priority for Personnel Preparation
Issuing Agency: Department of Education

Summary: Purpose of Program: The purposes of this program are to (1) help address State-identified needs for highly qualified personnel--in special education, related services, early intervention, and regular education--to work with children with disabilities; and (2) ensure that those personnel have the skills and knowledge--derived from practices that have been determined through research and experience to be successful--that are needed to serve those children.

Priority: The Secretary is particularly interested in supporting high quality training programs that are preparing occupational therapists to provide services to infants, toddlers, children and youth who are served under IDEA.

Applications Available: June 5, 2006.
Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: July 5, 2006
For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2006-2/060506d.html

737. New Consortium on Early Childhood Development Launched

Source: University of Chicago - May 25, 2006

Nobel laureate James Heckman and the Pritzker Family Foundation recently launched the Pritzker Consortium for Early Childhood Education at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago. The goal of the consortium is to "identify the most important development opportunities for children 5 years and younger, and to transform the way society and the business community view investments in early childhood education." For more information go to http://www-news.uchicago.edu/releases/06/060525.pritzker.shtml

738. Physically Healthy and Ready to Learn (Technical Assistance Paper No.1)

Source: Head Start - May 17, 2006

Head Start has published a new technical assistance paper entitled: Physically Healthy and Ready to Learn(Technical Assistance Paper No.1). Head Start's overall mission is to help children from low-income families start school ready to learn - to be ready to learn, young children need to be healthy. Healthy Foundation; Ongoing Care; Communication; Health and Safety; and Nutrition are among the ten topics included. To order and/or download the new resource go to http://www.headstartinfo.org/cgi-bin/pubcatstore.cfm?CatID=404&do=detail .

739. RFP Now Available: Supporting Gubernatorial Leadership for Building Early Childhood Systems

Source: NGA Center for Best Practices - Retrieved May 12, 2006

The NGA Center for Best Practices invites governors' offices to apply for competitive Building Early Childhood Systems grants that will support state leaders in three states to build comprehensive, coordinated early childhood (birth to age five) systems. Awarded in two phases, selected states will initially receive a grant up to $25,000 for Phase 1 activities. An additional $25,000 (maximum per state) for Phase 2 activities is contingent on annual Congressional appropriation of approved funding. This grant is funded by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Head Start Bureau. All states that are in good standing with NGA are eligible to apply. A fourth state may be selected if additional funding from non-federal sources is received.

Proposals must be received by 5:00 PM EDT on Friday, June 16, 2006. For complete information go to http://www.nga.org/Files/pdf/0605EARLYCHILDRFP.PDF [Note: Link checked on 5/6/2009 - this document is no longer available online.]

740. Journal Features Special Report On Child Mental Health

Source: MCH Alert - May 5, 2006

The May/June 2006 issue of Public Health Reports features a collection of six articles that offer a variety of perspectives on the problems facing the child mental health system and solutions to addressing children's mental health issues. Topics include child mental health and public health; mental health in schools; improving the care of children with mental illness; estimating the prevalence of early childhood serious emotional and behavioral disorders; patterns of mental health, primary care, and specialty care use; and use of the American Academy of Pediatrics-recommended disciplinary practice guidelines in Head Start programs. The issue is available to subscribers at http://www.publichealthreports.org.

[Originally published in MCHAlert 2006 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

741. Young Children in Immigrant Families The Role of Philanthropy: Sharing Knowledge, Creating Services, and Building Supportive Policies

Source: NCCP - May 5, 2006

The following new publication from the National Center for Children is Poverty is now available online:

Young Children in Immigrant Families The Role of Philanthropy: Sharing Knowledge, Creating Services, and Building Supportive Policies, Report of a Meeting, January 18-19, 2006.
One in five children in the United States is a child of immigrants, and the proportion is growing. Despite high rates of employment and marriage, immigrant families are more likely than native-born families to be low income and face other challenges that can place their children at risk. Members of the foundation community have an important role to play in working to achieve positive outcomes for these children. The report is available online at http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_661.html

742. New Policy Brief - Early Literacy: Policy and Practice in the Preschool Years

Source: NIEER - April 25, 2006

Early literacy plays an important role in supporting the kind of early learning experiences that research shows are linked with academic achievement, reduced grade retention, higher graduation rates and enhanced productivity in adult life. This policy brief synthesizes the body of professional knowledge about early literacy and offers research-based recommendations. View the full policy brief at http://nieer.org/resources/policybriefs/10.pdf

743. Two New Reports Discuss States' Efforts to Improve Mental Health and Primary Care Services for Young Children.

Source: The Commonwealth Fund - April 19, 2006

The following two new reports from the National Academy for State Health Policy and The Commonwealth Fund discuss developing successful partnerships with pediatric providers as one way state officials are trying to improve mental health and primary care services for their youngest, most vulnerable children.

  • Improving the Delivery of Health Care that Supports Young Children's Healthy Mental Development: Early Accomplishments and Lessons Learned from a Five-State Consortium, by Neva Kaye.
    The five states participating in the Fund's ABCD II initiative--designed to improve the delivery of mental health services for young children--are implementing policies and practices to improve developmental services, in particular, those that support the use of a standardized screening tool. The states have found that active partnerships with clinicians and pediatric organizations have been crucial in obtaining provider acceptance and support for improvement projects. Read the report to learn more about the early experiences of the ABCD states. Go to http://www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/publications_show.htm?doc_id=367138&
  • How States Are Working with Physicians to Improve the Quality of Children's Health Care, by Helen Pelletier.
    In their efforts to improve children's health care, many states are altering their relationship with the provider community. Not just regulators anymore, these states are partnering with pediatric clinicians through learning collaboratives, practice-based seminars, off-site workshops, and the Web. The report profiles state models and discusses lessons for other states that might want to pursue similar strategies. Go to http://www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/publications_show.htm?doc_id=367174&

744. Effective Communication about the Early Years: Understanding the Basics of Framing

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - April 18, 2006

Early childhood development is a complex process and we must communicate about it effectively, so that policymakers and the public fully understand the needs of infants and toddlers and solutions that best support families. This article from the ZERO TO THREE Policy Center provides a basic introduction to some concepts of effective communication about the early years, including the fundamentals of framing and ways to think about reframing your communications. It is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/framing_article_part_one_final.pdf?docID=1901

745. Unified Early Childhood and Early Childhood Special Education Teacher Certification: State Approaches

Source: Project Forum - Retrieved April 18, 2006

According to data collected by the National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC), states are increasingly offering what they describe as a "single certificate" for early childhood and early childhood special education (i.e., certification that covers children both with and without disabilities). This document describes states' approaches to these single certificates. Project Forum conducted its analysis as part of its cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP). It is available online at http://www.projectforum.org/docs/UnifiedEarlyChildhoodandEarlyChildhoodSpecialEducationTeacherCertification-StateApproaches.pdf

746. Technology Supports for Young Children: TAM Technology Fan

Source: Council for Exceptional Children - April 12, 2006

The appropriate use of technology supports can help infants, toddlers and young children with disabilities participate more independently in the full array of natural learning opportunities and settings that are available to all young children. The TAM Fan is a practical new tool for families, teachers, service providers, and others to use when considering technology items for young children birth to 5. It was developed by national experts at the Let's Play! Project Sue Mistrett, Amy Ruffino, Shelly Lane, Linda Robinson, Penny Reed,and Suzanne Milbourne. For ordering information go to http://www.tamcec.org/publications/fans.htm

747. Announcing a MCHCOM.COM Web Cast - Improving the Investigation of Sudden and Unexplained Infant Deaths

Source: Maternal and Child Health Bureau - April 12, 2006

Announcing a MCHCOM.COM web cast - Improving the Investigation of Sudden and Unexplained Infant Deaths.

Hosted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Reproductive Health, U. S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

May 16, 2006 - 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm EDT
Register for the event at http://www.mchcom.com/liveWebcastDetail.asp?leid=247

Background: Recently, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a new version of the National Sudden and Unexplained Infant Death Investigation (SUIDI) Reporting Form. This investigation form is now available for use in states and communities. This tool can guide and standardize the work and practices of EMS professionals, law enforcement, death scene investigators, medical examiners and coroners, death certifiers and child death review (CDR) team members. Information obtained by using the tool in infant death investigations can also be used to guide the development of strategies for the prevention of infant deaths.

The goals of the Web Cast are:

  • To explain the importance of infant death scene investigations in both the determining the manner and cause of sudden unexplained infant deaths.
  • To outline the components of a comprehensive, high quality infant death scene investigation.
  • To demonstrate why investigators can use the SUIDI tool to improve their investigations of infant deaths.
  • To demonstrate how state and local professionals can utilize the tool to meet their local reporting policies and practices.
  • To provide examples of how local and state child death review teams can advocate for improvements in infant death investigations.
  • To explain the new SUIDI reporting system and its relationship to other death reporting systems.
  • To encourage widespread dissemination of the form through the training resources available through the CDC.

For questions on this web cast's content, please contact the National Center for Child Death Review, info@childdeathreview.org, 1-800-656-2434

748. From Science to Public Policy: Court Teams for Maltreated Infants and Toddlers

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - April 3, 2006

Everyday in the United States, 118 infants are taken from their homes because their parents cannot care for them adequately. The youngest of children have the highest rates of maltreatment. Children between birth and three are 34% more likely to be placed in foster care than children between ages 4 and 11. Approximately 42% of these children demonstrate developmental delays that can have life-long implications if not properly addressed. This new article from the ZERO TO THREE Policy Center describes one effective model that demonstrates how the science of infant-toddler development and mental health can help both professionals and policymakers work toward improving outcomes for infants and toddlers in the child welfare system. Available at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/Court_Teams_science_to_policy_final.pdf?docID=1927

749. Grant notice - Secondary Data Analyses Based on the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

Source: Grants and Funding Opportunities (GFO) Alert - March 31, 2006

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) encourages scientists in the US and internationally to address research questions about family, child care, school, and child development through analyses of existing data sets from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. In particular, NICHD would like to see the data sets used by psychologists, sociologists, economists, statisticians, educators, policy makers, and physician scientists. Having such a scientific body of knowledge has the potential of leading to a deep and comprehensive understanding of variations in families, child care settings, and schools, and of how such variations are linked to the development of children from different walks of life.

To access the complete notice, go to http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-284.html

750. FY 2007 Competitions for Grants to Support Special Education Research Announced

Source: Federal Register: March 22, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 55)

On March 22, 2006, the Director of the Institute of Education Sciences announced the Institute's FY 2007 competitions for grants to support education research. The Institute will conduct five research competitions in FY 2007 through three of its National Education Centers. The National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) will hold two of these competitions.

Under the first competition, NCSER will consider only applications that address one of the following special education research topics:

  • Early Intervention, Early Childhood Special Education, and Assessment for Young Children with Disabilities.
  • Mathematics and Science Education.
  • Reading, Writing, and Language Development.
  • Serious Behavior Disorders.
  • Assessment for Accountability.
Under the second competition, NCSER will consider only applications that address one of the following special education research topics:
  • Individualized Education Programs and Individualized Family Service Plans.
  • Teacher Quality and Quality of Other Service Providers for Students with Disabilities.
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders.
  • Response to Intervention.
  • Secondary and Transition Services.
For complete information on these two competitions, as well as the other three competitions go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2006-1/032206a.html

751. From the Beginning: Early Head Start Children, Families, Staff, and Programs in 2004

Source: CLASP - March 22, 2006

This new policy brief from the Center for Law and Social Policy describes the Early Head Start program using data from the latest Program Information Reports (PIR), which all Head Start grantees must submit annually to the U.S. Department of Health. It provides information on Early Head Start programs, staff, and participants, including young children, pregnant women, and their families. Available online at http://www.clasp.org/publications/headstartbrief_7.pdf

752. Materials from the Third Annual Policy Maker's Summit Available Online

Source: Center for Evidence Based Practices in Early Learning - Retrieved March 3, 2006

Materials from the Third Annual Policy Maker's Summit on the topic of young children and challenging behavior are now available online. Materials include PowerPoint presentations, handouts, a summary, and participants' recommendations for action. Available at http://challengingbehavior.org/explore/presentations_workshops.htm

753. Reaching All Children? Understanding Early Care and Education Participation Among Immigrant Families

Source: George Washington University, Center for Law and Social Policy

Reaching All Children? Understanding Early Care and Education Participation Among Immigrant Families summarizes evidence about the participation of young children of immigrants in early care and education programs as well as relevant demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of immigrant families that likely influence children's participation in early learning programs. The paper was produced by the George Washington University Center for Law and Social Policy as part of the Breaking Down Barriers project to better understand and remedy the barriers to accessing high-quality early education programs that immigrant families face. Topics include the current immigration context; participation among children of immigrants in preschool, center-based care, and kindergarten (including Head Start); and the effect of demographics, limited English proficiency, and immigration status and citizenship on participation in preschool and center-based care. Policy recommendations for state and local administrators of pre-kindergarten and other early care and education programs are also proposed, as are areas for additional research. The paper is intended for use by policymakers and early education professionals in identifying and responding to the needs of immigrant families so that teachers, schools, and early childhood programs are prepared to serve these children. The paper is available at http://www.clasp.org/publications/child_care_immigrant.pdf. A brief that summarizes the paper is also available at http://www.clasp.org/publications/childcare_immigrantfamilies_brief.pdf.

754. Developmental Status and Service Use Among Children in the Child Welfare System.

Source: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 160(2):183-186.

"This study shows that lack of service use for developmental delay is a significant problem in the child welfare population," state the authors of an article published in the February 2006 issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. The lives of children in the child welfare system are often characterized by exposure to numerous risk factors for developmental delay, including the direct effects of abuse and neglect, poverty, in utero drug exposure, parental substance abuse, and mental health disorders. Studies have estimated that between 13% and 62% of children entering foster care have developmental delay. However, accurate prevalence data and identification of factors that influence developmental status are lacking, and rates of developmental service use among this high-risk population are rarely described in the literature. The objectives of the study described in this article were to estimate the prevalence of developmental delay and developmental service use among infants and children in the child welfare system and to identify factors that influence developmental delay and use of these services.

The study sample included infants and children ages 0-10 from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) and their caregivers who were reported to the child welfare system because of concern about abuse or neglect. NSCAW is the first publicly available data set to assess the health, development, and service use of a nationally representative sample of infants and children and their caregivers who have come into contact with the child welfare system.

The authors found that:

* Infants and children ages 0-2 represented 46% of the sample (n=1,998), children ages 3-5 represented 19% (n=834), and children ages 6-10 represented 35% (n=1,492). Forty-two percent were white and non-Hispanic, 33% were African American and non-Hispanic, 18% were Hispanic, and 7% were of other races and ethnicities.

* Twenty-four percent of the infants and children were developmentally delayed on at least one measure (cognitive development, language development, or adaptive skills).

* Infants ages 0-2 and children ages 3-5 had higher rates of developmental delay (37% and 33%, respectively), than children ages 6-10 (13%).

* Race, sex, income, type of child maltreatment, and placement status did not have a significant impact on developmental scores or service use.

* Only 38% of the infants and children with developmental delay were using developmental services (20% of infants and children ages 0-2 with developmental delay, 38% of children ages 3-5 with developmental delay, and 57% of children ages 6-10 with developmental delay).

* The authors conclude that "strategies for overcoming barriers to using early intervention services should be implemented."

A PDF download of the artcle can be found at http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/160/2/183. The abstract is also available at http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/160/2/183.

755. Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Program - Grant Notice

Source: Federal Register: February 1, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 21)

The purpose of the ECEPD program is to enhance the school readiness of young children, particularly disadvantaged young children, and to prevent them from encountering difficulties once they enter school, by improving the knowledge and skills of early childhood educators who work in communities that have high concentrations of children living in poverty.

Projects funded under the ECEPD program provide high-quality, sustained, and intensive professional development for these early childhood educators in how to provide developmentally appropriate school-readiness services for preschool-age children that are based on the best available research on early childhood pedagogy and on child development and learning. For these grants, increased emphasis is being placed on the quality of program evaluations for the proposed projects.

Applications Available: February 6, 2006.
Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: April 7, 2006.
Deadline for Intergovernmental Review: June 6, 2006.
More information is available at http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2006-1/020106a.html

756. Basic Facts About Low-Income Children: Birth to Age 6 and Birth to Age 3

Source: NCCP - February 3, 2006

Millions of children with low-income parents find themselves without the basics, even though the majority of low-income parents work. Young children continue to be disproportionately low income. The National Center for Children in Poverty's series, Basic Facts About Low-Income Children, 2006 edition, tracks children in the United States who live in low-income families by age. Basic Facts About Low-Income Children: Birth to Age 6, available at http://www.nccp.org/publications/show.php?id=680, presents basic facts on children birth to age 6 in low-income families, including children who live apart from both parents (e.g., foster children or children being raised by grandparents). For comparable information about infants and toddlers, see Basic Facts About Low-Income Children: Birth to Age 3, available at http://www.nccp.org/publications/show.php?id=679.

757. Focus on Early Childhood Education - R&D Alert Vol. 7, No. 3

Source: WestEd - February 3, 2006

The most recent R&D Alert from WestEd's Center for Prevention and Early Intervention (CPEI) focuses on the importance of early childhood education. It includes the following articles:

  • The Early Childhood Foundation for Lifelong Learning
  • From the CEO: Focusing on Early Childhood Education
  • Bridging Cultures in Early Childhood
  • Can Funding Preschool Today Reduce Budget Woes Tomorrow?
  • WestEd Resources on Early Childhood
It is available online at http://www.wested.org/cs/we/view/rs/794

758. National Workshop on Mild and Unilateral Hearing Loss - Conference Materials Now Available Online

Source: CDC - January 31, 2006

The Proceedings from the July 2005 National Workshop on Mild and Unilateral Hearing Loss are now available on the CDC-EHDI Web site at http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi/unilateralhi.htm. The main goal of this workshop was to examine current information on the identification and appropriate intervention strategies for children with mild and unilateral hearing loss. The first part of the workshop consisted of three sessions: (1) Prevalence and Screening; (2) Diagnosis, Amplification, and Outcomes; and (3) Early Intervention, Eligibility, and Clinical Practice. Each of these sessions included presentations by researchers and clinicians that highlighted key issues. During the second part of the workshop, participants joined breakout groups to discuss issues associated with mild and unilateral hearing loss in children. Lastly, the facilitator of each breakout group presented a summary to all participants of what was discussed in their respective groups.

759. Reaching All Children? Understanding Early Care and Education Participation Among Immigrant Families

Source: CLASP - January 19, 2006

Reaching All Children? Understanding Early Care and Education Participation Among Immigrant Families - This new paper from the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) explores the participation of young children of immigrants in early care and education programs and characteristics of immigrant families that may influence participation. It provides policy recommendations for state and local administrators of early care and education programs, and proposes areas for additional research. Available at http://www.clasp.org/publications/child_care_immigrant.pdf

760. Addressing Challenging Behavior - National Training Institute on Effective Practices

Source: Center for Evidenced Based Practice - January 5, 2006

Addressing Challenging Behavior - National Training Institute on Effective Practices
Supporting Young Children's Social/Emotional Development
Sheraton Sand Key Resort, Clearwater Beach, Florida
March 29-April 1, 2006

This National Training Institute will explore the latest information on addressing challenging behavior and implementing evidence-based practices. Visit http://www.www.addressingchallengingbehavior.org/ for registration, program, and travel information. If you have questions, please call (406) 543-0872 or email nti@dec-sped.org.

Sponsored by: Center for Evidence-Based Practice: Young Children with Challenging Behavior. In partnership with: DEC, NABE, CSEFEL, NACCRRA, NBCDI, NAEYC, and NHSA.

761. Child Care and Early Education Arrangements of Infants, Toddlers, and Preschoolers: 2001

Source: NCES - Retrieved January 6, 2005

This report is the latest in a set of reports from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) on young children's nonparental care arrangements and educational program participation. It presents the most recent data available for children under the age of six, taken from the 2001 administration of the Early Childhood Program Participation Survey, National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES). Variation in participation rates by characteristics of children (age and race/ethnicity) and their families (household income and mother's education and employment status), as well as by poverty status and geographic region or residence, are examined. Additionally, the report looks at how the child, family, and community characteristics are related to the time children spend in nonparental care each week and to the amount their families pay for care. It provides an in-depth examination of differences among children of different age groups and in different types of care. Available at http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006039

762. Request for Comments - Evaluation of States' Monitoring and Improvement Practices Under IDEA: Site Visit Data Collection

Source: Federal Register: December 22, 2005 (Volume 70, Number 245)

The Department of Education invites interested parties to submit comments on the following information collection request by January 23, 2006: Evaluation of States' Monitoring and Improvement Practices Under IDEA: Site Visit Data Collection.

Abstract: States' monitoring and improvement practices under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) are vital to ensuring that students with disabilities receive a free appropriate public education and that infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families receive early intervention services. The purpose of this study is to evaluate states' monitoring and related improvement practices under IDEA. This study will describe the nature and scope of monitoring as implemented by the 50 states and the District of Columbia for Parts B and C of IDEA, assess the effect of the quality of states' monitoring and related improvement practices on key outcomes of Parts B and C of IDEA, and identify and develop recommendations for potential best practices in monitoring and identify areas for ongoing technical assistance. For additional information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/2005-4/122205b.html

763. The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act Multi-Year Individualized Education Program Demonstration Program - Notice of Proposed Requirements and Selection Criteria

Source: Federal Register: December 19, 2005 (Volume 70, Number 242)

The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services proposes requirements and selection criteria for a competition in which the Department will select up to 15 States to participate in a pilot program, the Multi-Year Individualized Education Program (IEP) Demonstration Program (Multi-Year IEP Program). State proposals approved under this program would create opportunities for participating local educational agencies (LEAs) to improve long- term planning for children with disabilities through the development and use of comprehensive multi-year IEPs. Additionally, the proposed requirements and selection criteria focus on an identified national need to reduce the paperwork burden associated with IEPs while preserving students' civil rights and promoting academic achievement.

Comments on the selection and program criteria can be submitted until March 6, 2006. For more information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/proprule/2005-4/121905a.html

764. The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act Paperwork Waiver Demonstration Program - Notice of Proposed Requirements and Selection Criteria

Source: Federal Register: December 19, 2005 (Volume 70, Number 242)

The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services proposes requirements and selection criteria for a competition in which the Department will select up to 15 States to participate in a pilot program, the Paperwork Waiver Demonstration Program (Paperwork Waiver Program). State proposals approved under this program would create opportunities for participating States to reduce paperwork burdens and other administrative duties in order to increase time for instruction and other activities to improve educational and functional results for children with disabilities. The proposed requirements and selection criteria focus on an identified national need to reduce the paperwork burden associated with the requirements of Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as amended, while preserving students' civil rights and promoting academic achievement.

Comments on the selection and program criteria can be submitted until March 6, 2006. For more information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/proprule/2005-4/121905b.html

765. Helping Children Rebound: Strategies for Preschool Teachers After the 2005 Hurricanes

Source: www.teachingstrategies.com - Retrieved December 19, 2005

This guide from Teaching Strategies, Inc. is based on the Creative Curriculum for Preschool. It contains information on how children develop and learn, creating a positive learning environment, what children learn, the teacher's role, and the family's role. It also helps teachers set up interest areas that provide children with the opportunity to cope with disruption in their lives as they reenact their experiences. Teachers are given guidance on how they can purposefully observe what children do and say, reflect on these observations, and respond in supportive ways. To download a free copy go to http://www.teachingstrategies.com/content/pageDocs/Katrina_1005_final_web.pdf

766. Early Head Start: How Effective Was the Program for 3-Year-Old Children and Their Parents?

Source: Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. - Retrieved December 2, 2005

This article, published in the November 2005 issue of Developmental Psychology, describes the results of a study showing that 3-year-old Early Head Start program children performed better than control children in cognitive and language development, displayed higher emotional engagement of the parent and more sustained attention with play objects, and demonstrated less aggressive behavior. Compared with the control group, Early Head Start parents were more emotionally supportive, provided more language and learning stimulation, read to their children more, and spanked them less. The strongest impacts were for programs that offered a mix of both home-visiting and center-based services and that fully implemented the performance standards early. Available at http://www.apa.org/journals/releases/dev416885.pdf

767. 2006-2007 Head Start Fellowships Applications

Source: Head Start Bureau - November 21, 2005

Individuals who are working in the field of child development and family services are encouraged to apply to become Head Start Fellows. The brochure that describes the leadership development program and an application form are available on-line at http://www.headstartinfo.org/partnership/fellows.htm

768. MIT Scientists Study Genetic Factors in Autism

Source: MIT Technology Review - November 14, 2005

With the aid of a $7.5 million grant from the Simons Foundation, MIT researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will combine imaging and genetic tools to better understand how genes contribute to the social and behavioral problems that characterize autism. To read an article about the research project go to http://technologyreview.com/BioTech-Genomics/wtr_15875,312,p1.html.

769. Promising Practices: Reducing Medical Neglect of Infants and Toddlers

Source: Children's Bureau - November 1, 2005

Young children involved with the child welfare system have an urgent need for comprehensive health and developmental assessments, and they often need medical services. However, obtaining assessments and services for these infants and toddlers is challenging, especially for those in foster care. Responding to these needs, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia developed the Starting Young program, which provides evaluations and referrals for early intervention services, primary health care, and medical specialty care for children under 3 who are in foster care, kinship care, or living with biological parents with child welfare involvement. Children are referred to the program by child welfare workers from many different agencies throughout the region. For complete information go to http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=69&sectionid=1&articleid=1059l

770. Guidelines for Identifying and Referring Persons with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Source: CDC - MMWR Recommendations and Reports - October 28, 2005

Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) results from maternal alcohol use during pregnancy and carries lifelong consequences. In 2002, CDC convened a scientific working group (SWG) of persons with expertise in FAS research, diagnosis, and treatment to draft criteria for diagnosing FAS. This report summarizes the diagnostic guidelines drafted by the SWG, provides recommendations for when and how to refer a person suspected of having problems related to prenatal alcohol exposure, and assesses existing practices for creating supportive environments that might prevent long-term adverse consequences associated with FAS. The guidelines are intended to facilitate early identification of persons affected by prenatal exposure to alcohol so they and their families can receive services that enable them to achieve healthy lives and reach their full potential. This report also includes recommendations to enhance identification of and intervention for women at risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5411a1.htm

771. Study Explores Variation in Need and Service Use Among Young Children in Child Welfare

Source: MCH Alert - October 28, 2005

This study "substantially expands our knowledge base regarding the developmental and behavioral needs and subsequent service use of young children in the CW [child welfare] system," state the authors of an article published in the October 2005 issue of Pediatrics. Several gaps remain in the research on the scope of the developmental and behavioral needs of the 4.5 million children throughout the nation referred to child welfare agencies each year. The study described in this article examines patterns of developmental and behavioral problems and corresponding early intervention service use among a nationally representative sample of young children in contact with U.S. child welfare agencies as the result of allegations of abuse or neglect. For more information go to http://www.mchlibrary.info/alert/2005/alert102805.html#4

[Originally published in MCHAlert 2005 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

772. NIH Joined by Advocacy Groups to Fund Research on Autism Susceptibility Genes

Source: NIH News - October 18, 2005

Five institutes at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and three private autism organizations have formed a consortium and are funding five grants representing three projects to identify genes that may contribute to the development of autism and Autism Spectrum Disorders. The National Institute of Mental Health will administer the $10.8 million awards over the next five years ... To read the full press release go to http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/nimh-18.htm

773. National Children's Study Announces Contracts to First Research Centers

Source: NIH News - September 29, 2005

The National Children's Study planned to be the largest study ever undertaken to assess the effects of the environment on child and adult health took a major step forward today with the announcement that contracts have been awarded to 6 Vanguard Centers to pilot and complete the first phases of the Study. The full Nationwide Study would follow a representative sample of children from early life through adulthood, seeking information to prevent and treat such health problems as autism, birth defects, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity... The planned National Children's Study is led by a consortium of federal agency partners: the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services (including the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences at NIH, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The following Institutions have been named as the Vanguard Centers for the National Children's Study:

  • University of California, Irvine, for the Study location of Orange County, California
  • University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, for the Study location of Duplin County, North Carolina
  • Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, for the Study location of Queens County, New York
  • Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Drexel University School of Public Health, Philadelphia, for the Study location of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania
  • University of Utah, Salt Lake City, for the Study location of Salt Lake County, Utah
  • University of Wisconsin (UW), Madison, and the Medical College of Wisconsin, for the Study location of Waukesha County, Wisconsin
The federal agencies sponsoring the Study are still negotiating to establish two additional Vanguard Centers that will serve counties in other areas. For complete information go to http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/sep2005/nichd-29.htm

774. New Reports on the Early Learning and Educational Experiences of American Indians and Alaska Natives

Source: Institute of Education Sciences - September 20, 2005

The National Center for Education Statistics, within the Institute of Education Sciences, recently issued the following two reports, which describe the early learning and educational experiences of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

  • American Indian and Alaska Native Children: Findings From the Base Year of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort, profiles data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, a nationally representative study following some 10,700 children born in the United States in 2001. The Office of Indian Education provided support for increasing the sample of Native births so that the study could report on these children's early learning experiences. Some 600 Native children and their families from across the country are participating in the study that will follow the children into kindergarten. Available online at http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005116
  • Status and Trends in the Education of American Indians and Alaska Natives examines the educational performance and challenges facing Native children and adults in the United States. Available at http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005108

775. Promoting Childrens Healthy Mental Development: Lessons and Accomplishments from Five States

Source: The Commonwealth Fund - September 22, 2005

The Commonwealth Fund-sponsored Assuring Better Child Health and Development Initiative (ABCD II) helps states strengthen primary health care services and systems that support the healthy mental development of young children, ages 0-3. On Friday, October 14, the National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) is hosting a live, interactive Web conference co-sponsored by the Fund that will include representatives from the five states participating in ABCD II. These speakers will share early lessons and accomplishments, and the conference will include opportunities for questions and answers. The conference will be held from 2:00-3:30 EST. To register and receive information about how to participate, go to http://www.nashp.org/_docdisp_page.cfm?LID=876C5644-9686-4019-91E41E76706F73A6

776. Child Health USA 2004

Source: Maternal and Child Health Bureau - September 16, 2005

The Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) recently published Child Health USA 2004, the 15th annual report on the health status and service needs of America's children. To assess the Bureau's progress toward achieving its vision for a nation where all individuals enjoy equal access to quality health care in a supportive, culturally competent, family and community setting, MCHB has compiled this book of secondary data for 55 health and health care indicators. It provides both graphical and textual summaries of data and addresses long-term trends where applicable. Available online at http://www.mchb.hrsa.gov/mchirc/chusa_04/

777. Supporting Peer Social Skills in Early Childhood Settings - Internet Chat

Source: CSEFEL - September 22, 2005

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) announces Supporting Peer Social Skills in Early Childhood Settings, an online chat session with Ted Bovey. This chat session will be held on Wednesday, October 5, 2005 at 8-9 pm ET (7-8 pm CT/ 6-7 pm MT/ 5-6 pm PT). It will focus on teaching positive social skills to young children and strategies for embedding meaningful social opportunities into the daily routine of an early childhood classroom. For complete information go to http://www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel/chat/bovey-trans.html

The full transcripts from previous chat sessions can be accessed at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel/chat.html

778. Supporting Early Childhood Programs in Areas Affected by Hurricane Katrina

Source: NAEYC - September 16, 2005

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) has been working closely with leaders of the state Affiliates in Alabama and Louisiana (there is no NAEYC Affiliate in Mississippi) and the Southern Early Childhood Association (SECA), as well as Affiliates in Texas and other states that have taken in families evacuated from the Gulf Coast area. Those efforts include a project with SECA, "Hand to Hand and Heart to Heart," to coordinate support for early childhood programs in the affected areas. More information about this project is available at http://www.naeyc.org/helping/pdf/HandtoHand.pdf [Note: Link checked on 2/22/2007 - this document is no longer available online].

NECTAC will continue to compile and organize information on Katrina relief efforts and implications for early intervention and early childhood special education programs at http://www.nectac.org/announce/katrina.asp.

779. Preschool Education: A Concept Whose Time Has Come

Source: NIEER - September 9, 2005

A recent article by Steve Barnett, Director of the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIERR), traces the growth of preschool from its beginning to the present day. While encouraged by the steady growth in state-funded preschool programs over the past decade, Dr. Barnett also notes some growing pains - limited access and less-than high quality programs - that still need to be addressed. Read more in the National Association of Elementary School Principal's Sept/Oct issue of Principal magazine, available at http://www.naesp.org/Publications.aspx5

780. Making a Difference: A Framework for Supporting First and Second Language Development in Preschool Children of Migrant Farm Workers

Source: Academy for Educational Development - Retrieved August 25, 2005

The Academy for Educational Development (AED) recently released a new publication entitled Making a Difference: A Framework for Supporting First and Second Language Development in Preschool Children of Migrant Farm Workers. It is available online at http://www.aed.org/ToolsandPublications/upload/MakingaDifference1.pdf

781. Initiative Reports Provide Guidance to States in Early Childhood Health Policy

Source: MCH Alert - August 19, 2005

The National Center for Infant and Early Childhood Health Policy has released four new reports designed to support the planning and implementation of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) State Early Childhood Comprehensive Services (SECCS) Initiative. The reports are intended to increase visibility of early childhood policy issues on the national agenda by synthesizing the policy relevance of emerging early childhood health issues, analyzing systems-building and programmatic issues, and disseminating the latest research findings. The reports examine infant mental health, maternal depression, cultural competence, and medical homes. To learn more and to access the reports, go to the full MCH Alert article at http://www.mchlibrary.info/alert/2005/alert081905.html#1

[Originally published in MCHAlert 2005 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

782. Materials from the 2005 Child Care Policy Research Consortium Meeting

Source: www.childcareresearch.org - August 4, 2005

Materials from the annual Child Care Policy Research Consortium Meeting that was held in March 2005, are now available online. The Child Care Policy Research Consortium is a national alliance of research projects sponsored by the Child Care Bureau in the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, with the goal of improving the quality of child care research, identifying and responding to critical issues, and linking child care research with policy and practice. To access summaries of sessions, PowerPoint presentations, posters, and handouts from this year's conference, please visit Frontiers in Child Care Research: Annual Meeting of the Child Care Policy Research Consortium.

783. Vaccines and Autism: Institute of Medicine President on NBC's Meet the Press

Source: National Academies Press - August 5, 2005

On Sunday August 7th, Dr. Harvey Fineberg, President of the Institute Of Medicine, will appear on "Meet the Press" to speak with moderator, Tim Russert, on the subject of vaccines and autism.

"Meet the Press" is regularly seen from 9-10 a.m. ET, except in Washington D.C. and New York City where the broadcast is seen from 10:30-11:30 a.m ET. Please check local listings or the "Meet the Press" Web site ( http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3080248/) for airtimes in your area.

784. Child Early Intervention Programs Make for Healthier Adults

Source: Press Release: Children's Hospital Boston - July 5, 2005

A 25-year follow-up study of a comprehensive early health and education intervention program begun in the early 1970s shows that inner-city children who participated not only did better educationally, but had better physical and mental health in adulthood. The findings, published in the July 2005 issue of Pediatrics, add to evidence that programs like Early Head Start, which was modeled on this intervention, provide good value to society. While several have shown that early intervention programs lead to better academic outcomes during the school years, this study, led by researchers at Children's Hospital Boston and Boston College, is one of the first to look at long-term effects on health and health behaviors. See the full press release at http://www.childrenshospital.org/newsroom/Site1339/mainpageS1339P1sublevel146.html

Full citation:
Palfrey, J. S., Hauser-Cram, P., Bronson, M. B., Warfield, M. E., Sirin, S., & Chan, E. (2005). The Brookline early education project: A 25-year follow-up study of a family-centered early health and development intervention. Pediatrics, 116(1), 144-152.

785. Funding Opportunity - Head Start State Collaboration Offices

Source: ACF Grant Opportunities - July 18, 2005

The Department of Health & Human Services, Administration for Children and Families is requesting applications from eligible States to continue the Head Start State Collaboration Offices. The following States are eligible to apply for funding in Fiscal Year 2005 for a project period of five years: Kentucky, Maine, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota and Texas.

Since its inception, Head Start grantees have collaborated with an array of public and private entities to provide comprehensive services. In the increasingly complex funding and policy environment, Head Start recognizes the importance and role of the State in planning, policy development, and program administration that affects low-income children and their families. The Head Start State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) was established to maintain communication and ensure Head Start's participation in systems-integration strategies to benefit low-income children and their families. As States continue to expand their investment, the HSSCO continues to be a valuable catalyst to enhance relationships among Head Start programs, child care providers, and State pre-school programs.

For complete information go to [Note: Link checked on 11/26/2007 - this document is no longer available online. For other ACF grant opportunities go to http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/ ].

786. Focus on Early Childhood Education from the Harvard Education Letter

Source: Harvard Education Letter - Retrieved July 8, 2005

A growing body of research demonstrates the critical role high-quality early childhood education plays in students' success, not only in the elementary grades but throughout their lives. The decisions we make now about the ways in which today's preschool and early elementary students are taught will affect our entire society for many years to come. "Focus on Early Childhood Education" is an ongoing series of articles on education in preschool through grade three from the Harvard Education Letter. The current issue is available at http://www.hel-earlyed.org/. It contains the following articles:

  • Early Childhood Education at a Crossroads: Access to preschool has come a long way, but critical choices lie ahead
  • Preschool Enrollment - Equal Access for All?
  • Bridging the PreK-Elementary Divide: Concerns about early achievement gaps prompt programs that link prekindergarten with elementary school
  • Three Promising Initiatives
  • From Literacy to Learning: An interview with Catherine Snow
  • Family Income and School Readiness

787. GAO Update on the Number of Prekindergarten Care and Education Programs

Source: Government Accountability Office - July 2, 2005

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) today released the following correspondence: GAO Update on the Number of Prekindergarten Care and Education Programs. GAO-05-678R. This letter updates a list originally compiled in 2000 of federal programs providing or supporting education or care for children under the age of 5. Available online at: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05678r.pdf.

788. Funding Opportunity: Consortium for Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect (LONGSCAN)

Source: Children's Bureau - July 1, 2005

Federal Agency Name: Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children's Bureau

Funding Opportunity Title: Consortium for Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect (LONGSCAN)

Executive Summary: The purpose of these grants is to support a fourth implementation phase of the Consortium for Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect, which is conducting and coordinating prospective studies of young children who are at risk or who have already experienced maltreatment. These studies are expected to contribute to the knowledge of the etiology and consequences of child maltreatment, and provide new insights into the prevention, identification and treatment of maltreatment.

For complete information go to http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/open/HHS-2005-ACF-ACYF-CA-0087.html [Note: Link checked on 11/26/2007 - this document is no longer available online. For other ACF grant opportunities go to http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/ ].

789. Model Demonstration Centers on Progress Monitoring: Notice Inviting Applications - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services

Source: Federal Register: June 30, 2005 (Volume 70, Number 125)

Funding Opportunity Description: The purpose of this program is to promote academic achievement and improve results for children with disabilities by supporting technical assistance, model demonstration projects, dissemination of useful information, and implementation activities that are supported by scientifically based research.

Background: Progress monitoring offers an economical and efficient strategy for measuring student performance and growth and, consistent with the No Child Left Behind Act and IDEA, for improving the achievement of children with disabilities ... Given the growing body of evidence around the importance of school readiness skills and intervening early, progress monitoring for preschool-age children is emerging as an appropriate focus for research ... For preschool-age children, progress monitoring would involve a process targeting readiness goals: establishing readiness goals for all children in a classroom, determining the method for measuring progress towards these goals, and reporting data outcomes in a way that is easily understood by educators, parents, and children.

For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2005-2/063005b.html

790. New Resources from the Center for Evidence-Based Practice (CEBP)

Source: CEBP - June 8, 2005

The Center for Evidence-Based Practice (CEBP) has created three new handouts that provide professionals and family members evidence-based recommendations on a variety of topics:

  • Supporting Infants and Toddlers with Challenging Behavior
  • Linking Social Development and School Readiness to Behavior
  • Program Practices for Promoting the Social Development of Young Children and Addressing Challenging Behavior
These handouts can be viewed and downloaded at http://www.challengingbehavior.org/do/resources/tacsei_resources_all.htm.

CEBP also has presentation materials available for individuals to use in their own programs on the following topics:

  • Impact and Prevalence: This presentation developed by Matt Timm and Lise Fox discusses the prevalence of social emotional issues and challenging behaviors in preschoolers as well as the impact that these issues have on children later in life if left untreated
  • Effective Practices for Preventing and Addressing Young Children's Challenging Behaviors developed by Mary Louise Hemmeter
PowerPoint presentations for these topics and their accompanying handouts are available at: http://www.challengingbehavior.org/communities/trainers.htm

791. Head Start: Further Development Could Allow Results of New Test to Be Used for Decision Making

Source: GAO.gov - May 17, 2005

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) today released the following new report: Head Start: Further Development Could Allow Results of New Test to Be Used for Decision Making - GAO-05-343. In September 2003, the Head Start Bureau implemented the National Reporting System (NRS), the first nationwide skills test of over 400,000 4- and 5-year-old children. The NRS is intended to provide information on how well Head Start grantees are helping children progress. This report examines: what information the NRS is designed to provide; how the Head Start Bureau has responded to concerns raised by grantees and experts during the first year of implementation; and whether the NRS provides the Head Start Bureau with quality information.

Full report: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05343.pdf
Highlights - http://www.gao.gov/highlights/d05343high.pdf

792. Education Subcommittee Approves Castle Bill to Reform and Reauthorize Head Start Program

Source: News from the Committee on Education and the Workforce - May 11, 2005

The U.S. House Subcommittee on Education Reform today approved legislation that would would reauthorize the Head Start program for five years. The bill, the School Readiness Act of 2005 (H.R. 2123), was approved with bipartisan support by voice vote. The full text of H.R. 2123 is available at http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/z?c109:H.R.2123:.

793. Key Measurement Issues in Screening, Referral, and Follow-Up Care for Young Children's Social and Emotional Development

Source: National Academy for State Health Policy - Retrieved May 12, 2005

Key Measurement Issues in Screening, Referral, and Follow-Up Care for Young Children's Social and Emotional Development - This report is designed to assist states in assessing the effectiveness of their efforts to strengthen mental health services for very young children. The paper is an outgrowth of the work being conducted by the five states involved in the ABCD II Consortium, a project of NASHP and the Commonwealth Fund that seeks to improve the delivery of services needed by very young children to ensure their healthy mental development. All five states needed reliable and valid measures to inform implementation efforts and ongoing program evaluation. This technical report, based on the work of the ABCD II states, is meant to provide tips and tools to other states interested in undertaking similar work and facing similar financial and data constraints. C. Peck Reuland, C. Bethell. April 2005. 32pp. Funded by The Commonwealth Fund. Available online at http://www.nashp.org/Files/measurement_paper_for_web_final_4.7.05.pdf

794. Leadership Strategies for Supporting Children's Social and Emotional Development and Addressing Challenging Behavior - Online Chat

Source: CSEFEL - March 24, 2005

On March 30, 2005 from 2-3 PM ET, the Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) will be hosting an online chat entitled Leadership Strategies for Supporting Children's Social and Emotional Development and Addressing Challenging Behavior. To learn more go to http://csefel.uiuc.edu/chat.html.

795. Healthy Steps for Young Children: New Findings From Two Analyses

Source: The Commonwealth Fund - Retrieved March 10, 2005

A number of child health initiatives in recent years have sought to prom