June 1, 2018

In this Issue:

  1. Zika and Pregnancy
      Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  2. The Workforce Data Deficit
      Source: Center for the Study of Child Care Employment (CSCCE)
  3. Protecting Brains, Stimulating Minds (Video)
      Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University
  4. Implementation Research and Practice for Early Childhood Development
      Source: New York Academy of Sciences

1. Zika and Pregnancy

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC has recently updated its Zika and Pregnancy website (May 2018) to include Zika Pregnancy and Infant Registry communication tools to encourage healthcare providers to securely send medical information to their local health department about infants born to mothers infected by Zika during pregnancy. It is crucial to monitor the health of these children until their second birthday. Some of these new materials include:

2. The Workforce Data Deficit

Source: Center for the Study of Child Care Employment (CSCCE)

This recent brief from the CSCCE (April 2018) discusses the need for high quality unbiased data in order to make sound policy decisions to improve the early care and education workforce. "Only data can reveal inequities in access to professional development and better working conditions for early educators and inequities in access to highly qualified, well-supported early educators for children." The brief further explains that data must be collected on a regular basis, comparable across regions states, and localities, and be linked to data at both the program level and the child/family level. Detailed recommendations and examples of some states' challenges and promising data practices are also provided.

3. Protecting Brains, Stimulating Minds (Video)

Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University shares its public lecture (April 2018) from director, Jack Shonkoff, who explains that without effective tools for preventing the effects of toxic stress, we will not be able to fully achieve the benefits of evidence-based programs in early childhood. "Understanding both the biology of adversity and the science of early learning is essential for building a strong foundation for reducing disparities in educational achievement." The lecture is followed by a question and answer session with the audience.

4. Implementation Research and Practice for Early Childhood Development

Source: New York Academy of Sciences

A special issue published last month (May 2018) in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences targets implementation research and practice for early childhood development in a number of areas based on reports and case studies. With a global perspective, this issue offers multiple recommendations for evidence-based interventions, programs, practices and policies in early childhood development.