April 6, 2018

In this Issue:

  1. Which Technical Assistance (TA) Center Should I Contact?
      Source: Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP)
  2. Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (IECMHC) Toolbox
      Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
  3. Federal Spending on Prenatal to Three
      Source: Center for the Study of Social Policy
  4. The State of America's Children 2017
      Source: Children's Defense Fund

1. Which Technical Assistance (TA) Center Should I Contact?

Source: Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP)

OSEP funds a network of centers tasked with providing resources and TA around the implementation of IDEA. Six of the centers work with state agencies responsible for implementing IDEA's early childhood provisions, IDEA Part C and Part B Section 619. These centers have recently collaborated to develop an easy-to-use infographic (April 2018) outlining their services and distinct content areas within their work scopes. The centers also collaborate closely to ensure states receive the TA and resources necessary to meet their specific needs.

2. Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (IECMHC) Toolbox

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

SAMHSA recently launched a comprehensive Toolbox, including a series of videos and podcasts, to assist stakeholders to implement and expand IECMHC to support young children's mental health and school readiness. Fourteen states and tribal communities will pilot the Toolbox through focused training and technical assistance provided by the Center of Excellence for IECMHC. Much of the Toolbox is designed to promote equity and provides guidance for the following areas:

  • Systems and Policy
  • Models
  • Research and Evaluation
  • Competencies
  • Workforce Development
  • Communications
  • Financing

3. Federal Spending on Prenatal to Three

Source: Center for the Study of Social Policy

A new report from the Center for the Study of Social Policy (March 2018) reviews federal funding sources for families and children prenatal to three. While the number of different federal programs for income support, nutrition, housing, health, early care and education, child welfare and family support can be perceived as sufficiently meeting the needs of young children and their families, the overall reach of these investments is actually quite limited. This is especially so for programs in prevention, early intervention, and supports aimed at strengthening families.

To make the most improvement in young children's health and development, the report recommends "expanding efforts to improve safety, stability and nurturing in the home environment and expanding community resources and opportunities in poor neighborhoods." Appendices and references are also provided.

4. The State of America's Children 2017

Source: Children's Defense Fund

The Children's Defense Fund has published a new edition of its annual report (December 2017) on the well-being of children. The State of America's Children 2017 provides data on child population, poverty, income and wealth inequality, housing and homelessness, child nutrition, child health, early childhood, education, and more. Some of its findings are below:

  • Every 49 seconds a baby is born into poverty.
  • Every 47 seconds a child is confirmed to have been abused or neglected.
  • Nearly 70 % of children living in poverty are children of color.
  • In 2016, Head Start served only 5 % of eligible babies, and 54 % of eligible 3- and 4-year-olds.

The corresponding state fact sheets include one-page summaries of the status of children across the states.