August 31, 2017

In this Issue:

  1. Leveraging Funds to Support Inclusion
      Source: Early Learning Challenge Technical Assistance (ELC TA)
  2. Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Update
      Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO)
  3. New Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (IECMH) Policy Series
      Source: ZERO TO THREE
  4. Supporting Transitions: Resources for Building Collaboration
      Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services
  5. Effective Family Engagement-Boosting School Readiness
      Source: U.S. Department of Education and Health and Human Services
  6. Helping Children with Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV)
      Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

1. Leveraging Funds to Support Inclusion

Source: Early Learning Challenge Technical Assistance (ELC TA)

This resource from ELC TA explains how the six Phase 3 ELC states (Georgia, Kentucky, Michigan, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Vermont) are optimizing ELC funds and other state funds to promote inclusion. In June 2017, ELC TA contacted the ELC grant coordinators requesting them to address five specific questions to help other states as they consider how to further increase the quality of early learning for children with special needs.

2. Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Update

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO)

As an informational service to early learning policymakers, agencies and practitioners, CEELO reviews department of education websites for all 50 states for new information related to ESSA state plans and implementation and provides monthly updates. This update (August 2017) describes CEELO's findings from a scan of 16 completed state ESSA plans as of April 2017 with a focus on how states are addressing early childhood education needs. It is noted that Delaware is the only state that makes high quality early childhood education its long-term goal. Also, Oregon describes its policies as part of a preK-12 continuum, including transition strategies for birth to preschool and preschool to kindergarten.

3. New Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (IECMH) Policy Series

Source: ZERO TO THREE

ZERO TO THREE announced its new Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (IECMH) Policy Series (August 2017). This series of briefing papers on IECMH policy is designed to generate awareness, interest, and action among federal and state policymakers, behavioral health administrators, and advocates. Each briefing paper provides an overview of the topic, a summary of key terms, and policy recommendations. Topics include:

4. Supporting Transitions: Resources for Building Collaboration

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services

Supporting transitions can have positive effects on children and their families, and collaboration is key to effective transitions. For this reason, the Office of Head Start provides a series of transition briefs. Each of the four briefs focuses on a different partnership level: (1) child and family, (2) early educators, (3) early care and education (ECE) programs, and (4) ECE partners. The Head Start Program Performance Standards outline transition requirements in 1302 Subpart G-Transition Services. The available briefs include:

5. Effective Family Engagement-Boosting School Readiness

Source: U.S. Department of Education and Health and Human Services

The Office of Head Start provides a series of simulations for effectively engaging families from the start. The series explores the practice of everyday strategies to develop Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with a family. These relationships are key to our work with children and families, including the journey toward school readiness.

  • Simulation 1 allows you to practice building bonds with families, beginning with an intake visit.
  • Simulation 2 explores the process of developing and implementing goals with families.
  • Simulation 3 explores using strengths-based attitudes to partner with families during challenging times.
  • Simulation 4 shows how to talk to families about developmental concerns.

6. Helping Children with Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV)

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

According to the CDC, about 1 in 200 babies are born with congenital CMV infection and 1 in 5 will show signs of illness or have long-term health problems, such as:

  • Hearing loss,
  • Vision loss,
  • Intellectual disability,
  • Small head size,
  • Lack of coordination,
  • Weakness or problems using muscles, and
  • Seizures.

For further details and prevention guidelines, visit: