July 7, 2017

In this Issue:

  1. Enhancing Reflection, Relationships, and Respect: New NM PreK Video
      Source: New Mexico PreK Video-Based Consultation Project
  2. Baby Teeth Link Autism and Heavy Metals
      Source: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
  3. Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS) 3.0 Tools and Resources
      Source: BUILD Initiative
  4. Starting Strong 2017
      Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
  5. Upgraded Website for the Alliance for Early Success
      Source: Alliance for Early Success
  6. Centers Serving High Percentages of Young Hispanic Children
      Source: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families
  7. Farm to Early Care and Education: Working to Equalize Health and Education Outcomes
      Source: BUILD Initiative

1. Enhancing Reflection, Relationships, and Respect: New NM PreK Video

Source: New Mexico PreK Video-Based Consultation Project

The New Mexico PreK Video-Based Consultation Project has been using video to support teachers and other service providers to learn new skills, participate in ongoing professional development, and engage in reflective practice and Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). The project recently launched a new video titled, Enhancing Reflection, Relationships, and Respect. Teachers are videotaped in the classroom, then given the opportunity to view the videos and reflect on activities and social interactions that worked well with the children, as well as, identify areas for improvement.

2. Baby Teeth Link Autism and Heavy Metals

Source: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

A recent study from the NIEHS has discovered that children with autism have more toxic lead and less of the essential nutrients zinc and manganese in their baby teeth, as compared to teeth of children who do not have autism. The differences in metal absorption for children with or without autism were especially significant during the months just before and after birth. The findings suggest that autism begins in the womb, and that our environment can increase a child's risk.

3. Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS) 3.0 Tools and Resources

Source: BUILD Initiative

The BUILD Initiative has released its fourth and final issue of QRIS 3.0 Tool and Resource Spotlight featuring the Tool for a Cross-Sector QRIS, including a scoring rubric and self-populating summary chart. The tool assesses QRIS to support school readiness, healthy child development, and equitable outcomes for young children.

4. Starting Strong 2017

Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

The OECD has released its 2017 report providing an exhaustive overview of key indicators global-wide and new trend data affecting early childhood education and care (ECEC). The report focuses on issues, such as access and governance, equity, financing, curriculum, the teaching workforce and parent engagement. It also identifies the key challenges for improving ECEC.

5. Upgraded Website for the Alliance for Early Success

Source: Alliance for Early Success

The Alliance for Early Success has recently revised its website. New to the site are three databases accessible through the "Resources" tab:

  • Alliance Clearinghouse - a collection of briefs, reports and data aimed at improving state policies for young children
  • Making the Case - useful websites, toolkits and infographics for social media aimed at communicating the importance of the early years
  • State Data - state fact sheets, maps and profiles on a variety of topics related to early childhood and care

Each database is searchable by keyword, publication year, organization, product type, and policy framework area.

6. Centers Serving High Percentages of Young Hispanic Children

Source: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families

This June 2017 report from the National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families reveals that high-Hispanic-serving centers are performing equally well or better than low-Hispanic-serving centers in many predictors of quality, especially in staff coaching and mentoring experiences and use of curriculum. Another finding was that children enrolled in high-Hispanic-serving centers had more support in their developmental progress and earlier detection of needed interventions, as they were more likely to have access to health screenings.

7. Farm to Early Care and Education: Working to Equalize Health and Education Outcomes

Source: BUILD Initiative

This recent blog issue from BUILD Initiative notes that more than half of children aged 0 to 6 living in low-income families are enrolled in an early child care and education program; and many of them are getting 50-66% of their food in a child care environment. The communities in which many of these young children live also lack access to affordable foods that support a healthy diet. The significance of providing the highest quality food possible in these early care and education settings is further explained.