May 26, 2017

In this Issue:

  1. The State of Preschool 2016
      Source: The National Institute for Early Education Research
  2. Gender Differences in the Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program
      Source: National Bureau of Economic Research
  3. Homeless Families with Young Children - Snapshot from the FY2016-FY2018 CCDF State Plans
      Source: Office of Child Care
  4. A Journey Toward Strong Programs and Thriving Families
      Source: HHS, Office of Early Childhood Development
  5. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online
      Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention

1. The State of Preschool 2016

Source: The National Institute for Early Education Research

The State of Preschool 2016 (May 2017), NIEER's latest edition of its annual yearbook report profiling state-funded prekindergarten programs in the U.S. is now available. It is the only national report on state-funded preschool programs with detailed information on enrollment, funding, teacher qualifications, and other policies related to quality. Here you will find data on state-funded preschools from the 2015-2016 school year and retrospective data since 2001. The 2016 Yearbook profiles state-funded preschool programs across 43 states, plus Guam and the District of Columbia, and includes information on efforts made in early education from states and the U.S. territories that do not provide state-funded preschool. Learn more about the yearbook here.

2. Gender Differences in the Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program

Source: National Bureau of Economic Research

A recently published paper, Gender Differences in the Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program (NBER Working Paper No. 23412, May 2017), by Jorge Luis Garcia, James J. Heckman, Anna L. Ziff, examines how participation in early childhood programs differentially impacts the lives of disadvantaged boys and girls. The authors find that although high-quality programs can have positive impacts across the life cycle for both boys and girls, low-quality programs can have harmful effects on many outcomes, especially for boys, and can contribute to gender gaps. The authors discuss the different impacts for boys and girls and the sources of these differences.

3. Homeless Families with Young Children - Snapshot from the FY2016-FY2018 CCDF State Plans

Source: Office of Child Care

The Office of Child Care (OCC) has released a chart of activities related to Improving Access to High Quality Child Care for Homeless Families from the approved FY 2016-2018 Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Plans that became effective June 1, 2016. The CCDF Plans offer a snapshot into current and planned efforts, initiatives and implementation plans for each State/Territory over the next two years through September 30, 2018. See also, a new 2-page brief from the OCC on Meeting the Needs of Families with Young Children Experiencing and At Risk of Homelessness (May 2017).

4. A Journey Toward Strong Programs and Thriving Families

Source: HHS, Office of Early Childhood Development

The Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (Tribal MIECHV) program provides grants to develop, implement, and evaluate home visiting programs in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. A Journey Toward Strong Programs and Thriving Families: The Story of Three Tribal Home Visiting Grantees (May 2017) describes the experiences of three communities that have participated in the Tribal MIECHV program and the impacts the program has had. It discusses the systems changes that can provide a lasting and strong foundation upon which evidence-based home visiting programs can succeed and provides insights for other communities working on home visiting. Learn more about Tribal Home Visiting implementation.

5. Journal of Early Intervention Abstracts Available Online

Source: DEC's Journal of Early Intervention

Abstracts of the following articles are now available online at http://jei.sagepub.com/content/early/recent (Online First May 16, 2017)

Internalizing Behaviors and Hyperactivity/Inattention: Consequences for Young Struggling Readers, and Especially Boys

Justin D. Garwood, Cheryl Varghese, Lynne Vernon-Feagans

The Relationship Between State Lead Agency and Enrollment Into Early Intervention Services

Erica Twardzik, Megan MacDonald, Alicia Dixon-Ibarra

Beyond ASD: Evidence for the Effectiveness of Social Narratives

Kathleen N. Zimmerman, Jennifer R. Ledford

Parents’ Experiences Navigating Intervention Systems for Young Children With Mild Language Delays

Jennifer Marshall, Andrea Adelman, Stacey M. Kesten, Ruby A. Natale, Batya Elbaum

The Journal of Early Intervention (JEI) is an official publication of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children and SAGE Publications. It offers articles related to research and practice in early intervention for infants and young children with special needs and their families. Freely available Podcasts of interviews with JEI authors can be accessed online.