March 31, 2017

In this Issue:

  1. The Years Before School: Children's Nonparental Care Arrangements From 2001 to 2012
      Source: National Center for Education Statistics - March 28, 2017
  2. Clinical Considerations Related to the Behavioral Manifestations of Child Maltreatment
      Source: Pediatrics, 139(4) - April 2017
  3. QRIS Resources to Strengthen Early Learning Systems
      Source: BUILD Initiative - March 2017
  4. Updated Intervention Report on Success for All
      Source: Institute of Education Sciences, What Works Clearinghouse - March 28, 2017

1. The Years Before School: Children's Nonparental Care Arrangements From 2001 to 2012

Source: National Center for Education Statistics - March 28, 2017

A new report, The Years Before School: Children's Nonparental Care Arrangements From 2001 to 2012 (March 2017), examines the nonparental care arrangements of young children in the U. S. who are not yet enrolled in kindergarten. It examines the arrangements children participate in, the time they spend in these arrangements, and out-of-pocket expenses for families. It finds that almost 60% of children, from birth through age 5, participate in nonparental care arrangements. In 2012, there were higher out-of-pocket hourly expenses for care than in 2001. The expense for center-based care increased by 58%, for relative care by 57%, and for nonrelative care by 25%. Out-of-pocket hourly expenses for center-based programs were the most expensive for families.

2. Clinical Considerations Related to the Behavioral Manifestations of Child Maltreatment

Source: Pediatrics, 139(4) - April 2017

A clinical report published in the April issue of Pediatrics discusses the role of health care providers in helping children who have experienced maltreatment or neglect heal and achieve their developmental potential. Clinical Considerations Related to the Behavioral Manifestations of Child Maltreatment (April 2017) provides guidance on recognizing the behavioral and mental health symptoms often seen with maltreated children and on finding appropriate intervention. It includes a summary of the consequences of maltreatment and a discussion of currently available treatment approaches. This report updates a 2008 clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress.

4. Updated Intervention Report on Success for All

Source: Institute of Education Sciences, What Works Clearinghouse - March 28, 2017

The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) recently updated an intervention report on the Success for All (SFA) literacy program. Based on research examined in the earlier 2009 report as well as reviews of 111 additional studies, the WWC found SFA to have positive effects on alphabetics, potentially positive effects on reading fluency, and mixed effects on comprehension and general reading achievement for children in prekindergarten through grade 8.