October 7, 2016

In this Issue:

  1. Series of Briefs on the Early Childhood Workforce: Pathways to Progress
      Source: National Center on Early Childhood Development, Teaching, and Learning - September 2016
  2. Child Care Deserts: Developing Solutions to Child Care Supply and Demand
      Source: Child Care Aware of America - September 2016
  3. Joint Policy Statement: Coordinated Efficiencies in Monitoring and Oversight of Early Care and Education Programs
      Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Agriculture - September 29, 2016
  4. Federal Guidance: Building Systems of Support for Excellent Teaching and Leading
      Source: U.S. Department of Education - September 27, 2016
  5. The Zika Virus: Implications for Collaboration across Human Services Agencies and State Action Plans
      Source: Public Consulting Group - September 2016

1. Series of Briefs on the Early Childhood Workforce: Pathways to Progress

Source: National Center on Early Childhood Development, Teaching, and Learning - September 2016

A new series of briefs on the early childhood workforce are available at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/ecd/early-childhood-career-pathways. The briefs were developed to inform early childhood programs, states, higher education entities, and other interested stakeholders about strengthening the support they offer the early childhood workforce. They summarize findings in the Institute of Medicine's and National Research Council's 2015 report, Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth to Eight.

2. Child Care Deserts: Developing Solutions to Child Care Supply and Demand

Source: Child Care Aware of America - September 2016

A new paper, Child Care Deserts: Developing Solutions to Child Care Supply and Demand (September 2016), addresses the issue of access to high-quality, affordable child care and the increasing gap between child care supply and demand for families across the country. It introduces the concept of child care deserts broadly and provides information on both parent perceptions of child care deserts and the ways in which communities across seven States are approaching supply-and-demand issues.

3. Joint Policy Statement: Coordinated Efficiencies in Monitoring and Oversight of Early Care and Education Programs

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Agriculture - September 29, 2016

On September 29, 2016, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Agriculture (USDA) issued a joint policy statement on Coordinated Efficiencies in Monitoring and Oversight of Early Care and Education Programs. The joint policy statement includes 10 recommendations to assist states in rethinking monitoring approaches. They have also developed a new web page with tools and resources to spur discussion, ideas, and innovation to promote more effective monitoring strategies that better support monitors, providers, and the children who will benefit.

4. Federal Guidance: Building Systems of Support for Excellent Teaching and Leading

Source: U.S. Department of Education - September 27, 2016

New Non-Regulatory Guidance provides recommendations to support, recruit and retain high quality teachers through the use of funding from Title II, Part A of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), as well as other funding sources. This guidance highlights some key areas Title II, Part A funds can be used to support the workforce through better preparation, mentorship and induction, increased diversity, and bolstering teacher leadership. Strategies for using Title II, Part A funds to support the professional development of early educators can be found on page 24. This and additional guidance related to the ESSA can be found at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/index.html

5. The Zika Virus: Implications for Collaboration across Human Services Agencies and State Action Plans

Source: Public Consulting Group - September 2016

A new white paper, The Zika Virus: Implications for Collaboration across Human Services Agencies and State Action Plans (September 2016), is designed to help human service agencies, including early intervention, child care, early childhood, and public welfare agencies, start the process of coordinating and preparing to support children and families affected by the Zika virus. Research has documented a wide range of neurologic abnormalities in babies infected with Zika, including microcephaly, problems with vision, hearing loss, and impaired growth. The white paper provides information about the causes and costs of the Zika virus, state government and provider planning efforts, actionable suggestions for prevention and intervention, and a comprehensive list of state-by-state online resources for Zika action planning.