April 8, 2016

In this Issue:

  1. Poverty and Child Health in the United States - AAP Policy Statement and Report
      Source: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) - April 1, 2016
  2. Eleven New Videos to Support Early Care and Education Practitioners
      Source: California's Desired Results Access Project - April 4, 2016
  3. Comparison of Eligibility and Service Delivery Policies Between IDEA Part C and Part B
      Source: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management - March 24, 2016
  4. Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships: Year One Report
      Source: Administration for Families and Children - April 1, 2016
  5. Head Start Program Fact Sheets for 2014
      Source: CLASP - April 5, 2016
  6. Child Care Assistance Spending and Participation in 2014
      Source: CLASP - April 1, 2016
  7. Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting: A Report to Congress
      Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - April 4, 2016

1. Poverty and Child Health in the United States - AAP Policy Statement and Report

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) - April 1, 2016

Close to half of all young children in the U.S. currently live in poverty or near poverty, a factor that has been shown to negatively impact health, socioemotional development, and educational outcomes. The AAP has published a new policy statement, Poverty and Child Health in the United States (April 2016), which provides an overview of the problem, describes strategies that can ameliorate its effects, and recommends steps that can be taken to address the issue. The statement is accompanied by a new technical report, Mediators and Adverse Effects of Child Poverty in the United States (April 2016), providing more information on what is known about how childhood poverty effects health, development, and long-term outcomes.

2. Eleven New Videos to Support Early Care and Education Practitioners

Source: California's Desired Results Access Project - April 4, 2016

Eleven new videos of toddlers and preschoolers participating in typical routines and activities were recently added to the Desired Results Access Project Video Library. The videos are meant to provide early interventionists, early childhood special educators, and other early care and education practitioners opportunities to practice skills such as observation, documentation, and assessment. As with all Desired Results videos, they can be viewed online or downloaded for use in educational and professional development activities at no cost (select Practice Clips).

New clips Featuring Toddlers:

  • Tania Playing in the Yard (3:33) - Tania demonstrates a variety of gross motor, communication, and social skills.
  • Ben at Dinnertime (3:04) - Ben demonstrates a variety of social, communication, and mealtime skills.
  • Nicholas at Story Time (2:39) - Nicholas demonstrates a variety of fine motor, social, and early literacy skills.
  • Crystal Moving Around (3:26) - Crystal demonstrates a variety of movement, social, and communication skills.
  • Max at Mealtime (3:41) - Max demonstrates a variety of social, communication, and self-feeding skills.
  • Severina Plays Knock Knock (1:31) - Severina demonstrates a variety of social, communication, and fine motor skills.
  • Alec's Morning Routine (3:53) - Alec demonstrates a variety of self-help, social, and communication skills.

Clips Featuring Preschoolers:

  • Cody Plays with Glue and Wood (3:04) - Cody demonstrates a variety of fine motor skills.
  • Cody on the Playground (3:58) - Cody demonstrates a variety of gross motor skills.
  • Angel at the Computer (2:53) - Angel demonstrates a variety of computer skills.
  • Angel at Lunch (3:33) - Angel demonstrates a variety of mealtime and self-help skills.

3. Comparison of Eligibility and Service Delivery Policies Between IDEA Part C and Part B

Source: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management - March 24, 2016

A new paper provides a quick comparison of policies between Part C (early intervention for infants and toddlers) and Part B (special education) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Eligibility and Service Delivery Policies: Differences Between IDEA Part C and IDEA Part B: A Comparison Chart, 2016 compares Part C and Part B policies in the following areas: Eligibility Criteria, Eligibility Determination, Types of Services, Service Settings, Service Recipients, Parental Rights, and System of Payments. It is intended as a resource to support transition between these programs for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. It was developed as a companion piece to Aspects of Eligibility for Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing under IDEA Part B Section 619 Preschool: A Survey Report, 2015.

4. Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships: Year One Report

Source: Administration for Families and Children - April 1, 2016

The Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships (EHS-CCP) were created as a new approach to expanding access to high-quality care for infants and toddlers and their families. The EHS-CCP Year One Report (January 2015 - January 2016) is now available online. It provides information about the program, the program grantees, the program's early successes, and lessons learned from first year of the implementation.

5. Head Start Program Fact Sheets for 2014

Source: CLASP - April 5, 2016

Each year, Head Start programs are required to submit a Program Information Report (PIR) to the Office of Head Start on participating children, pregnant women, and families, as well as the staff serving the Head Start population. The following new fact sheets use information reported through the PIR to describe the children and families served in Head Start, Early Head Start, and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start and the services provided to them during the 2013-2014 program year.

6. Child Care Assistance Spending and Participation in 2014

Source: CLASP - April 1, 2016

Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) funds, as well as funds from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, are used by states to improve child care and to deliver child care assistance for low-income families. A new brief, Child Care Assistance Spending and Participation in 2014 (March 2016), analyzes national trends and 50-state data for spending and participation in CCDBG-and TANF-funded child care programs during fiscal year 2014. It finds that overall federal and state spending for child care assistance and participation in CCDBG-funded child care are at historically low levels. Expenditures in CCDBG and TANF combined have been almost flat since 2012 and the number of children served in CCDBG has been steadily declining since 2010.

7. Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting: A Report to Congress

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - April 4, 2016

Since 2010, the Tribal Home Visiting Program has expanded home visiting services in tribal communities, serving 1,523 families and providing nearly 20,000 home visits to some of the most vulnerable American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) families, who often experience multiple challenges. See Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting: A Report to Congress (April 2016) to learn more about the program, program implementation, program successes, and areas where improvement is needed.