February 5, 2016

In this Issue:

  1. Early Care and Education 2015 Legislative Action
      Source: National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) - January 2016
  2. Pre-K Attendance - Why It's Important and How to Support It
      Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) - February 2016
  3. Child Maltreatment 2014 - 25th Annual Report
      Source: Children's Bureau - January 25, 2016

1. Early Care and Education 2015 Legislative Action

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) - January 2016

The latest NCSL annual report on early care and education bills enacted during the 2015 session, Early Care and Education 2015 Legislative Action (January 2016), highlights significant 2015 legislative enactments for young children and families covering: appropriations and financing, child care (subsidy, quality, and access), early childhood data strategies, early childhood governance and systems, early childhood services, early childhood workforce, home visiting and parent education, and prekindergarten and school readiness. The report does not reflect all bills enacted during the 2015 session. For a complete list, go to the NCSL Early Education and Child Care Bill Tracking Database.

2. Pre-K Attendance - Why It's Important and How to Support It

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) - February 2016

A new CEELO Fast Fact, Pre-K Attendance - Why It's Important and How to Support It (February 2016), provides information on how chronic absenteeism from early care and education programs impacts short and long term outcomes, the potential causes of absenteeism, examples of what cities and states are doing to address the issue, and a collection of related resources.

3. Child Maltreatment 2014 - 25th Annual Report

Source: Children's Bureau - January 25, 2016

The Children's Bureau recently published Child Maltreatment 2014 (January 2016), presenting national data about child abuse and neglect known to child protective services agencies in the U.S. during federal fiscal year (FFY) 2014. The FFY 2014 report shows that the national estimate of unique child abuse and neglect victims was 702,000. The youngest children continued to be the most vulnerable; more than one-quarter (27.4%) of victims were younger than 3 years. The victimization rate was slightly higher for girls (50.7%) than for boys (48.9%). African-American children had the highest rates of victimization at 15.3 per 1,000 children in the population of the same race or ethnicity. See a collection of current and past Child Maltreatment Reports here.