November 20, 2015

In this Issue:

  1. Systemwide Solutions to Improve Early Intervention for Developmental–Behavioral Concerns
      Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved November 20, 2015
  2. Measuring Child Outcomes in the Early Years
      Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes - November 11, 2015
  3. Estimated Prevalence of Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities
      Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - November 13, 2015
  4. Early Childhood Higher Education: Taking Stock Across the States
      Source: Center for the Study of Child Care Employment - Retrieved November 20, 2015
  5. Report Finds Child Care Workers Aren't Paid Enough to Make Ends Meet
      Source: Economic Policy Institute - November 5, 2015
  6. Infants and Toddlers in the Policy Picture: A Self-Assessment Toolkit for States
      Source: ZERO TO THREE - November 19, 2015

1. Systemwide Solutions to Improve Early Intervention for Developmental–Behavioral Concerns

Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved November 20, 2015

A new article in Pediatrics, Systemwide Solutions to Improve Early Intervention for Developmental-Behavioral Concerns (November 2015), proposes that every U.S. state needs: 1) a family-friendly screening and care coordination entity; 2) comprehensive, tiered, and equitable assessments for "at-risk" or referred children; 3) universal access to high-quality early learning or preschool programs; and 4) continuous accountability for the early detection process from birth to 5 years, including a low-cost, outcome-based metric for kindergarten readiness.

Full citation: Marks, K. P., Griffen, A. K., Herrera, P., Macias, M. M., Rice, C. E., & Robinson, C. (2015). Systemwide Solutions to Improve Early Intervention for Developmental–Behavioral Concerns. Pediatrics, 136(6). http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2015-1723

For more information on developmental-behavioral monitoring and training, visit Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive!, a coordinated federal effort to encourage healthy child development, universal developmental and behavioral screening for children, and support for the families and providers who care for them.

2. Measuring Child Outcomes in the Early Years

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes - November 11, 2015

A new policy brief from the Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO), Measuring Child Outcomes in the Early Years (November 2015), provides information to inform decision-making regarding the assessment of young children's learning, development, and wellbeing for state and national assessments designed to influence early childhood education policy and practice. The primary focus is on the preschool years. The report does not review all of the individual assessments, but describes and illustrates each of the general approaches from which policy makers can choose.

3. Estimated Prevalence of Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - November 13, 2015

The results of the 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) show an estimated prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) of 2.24%, which is a significant increase from the previous 2011-2013 data. The 2014 survey reordered questions and used a new approach to asking about ASD, which likely affected the prevalence estimates. The prevalence estimates reported in this survey are now more similar to the prevalence estimates of ASD from other sources. To learn more see, Estimated Prevalence of Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities Following Questionnaire Changes in the 2014 National Health Interview Survey (November 2015).

The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a nationally representative household survey which collects data throughout the year using in person interviews. Information is collected on all family members (e.g. demographic and basic health). In addition, one adult and one child is randomly selecting from each family to answer more detailed health questions.

4. Early Childhood Higher Education: Taking Stock Across the States

Source: Center for the Study of Child Care Employment - Retrieved November 20, 2015

A new brief from the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, Early Childhood Higher Education: Taking Stock Across the States (November 2015) highlights the extent to which early childhood education teacher preparation is currently integrated across the birth-to-age-eight continuum, and on variations in field-based practice opportunities for teachers of young children.

5. Report Finds Child Care Workers Aren't Paid Enough to Make Ends Meet

Source: Economic Policy Institute - November 5, 2015

A new report from the Economic Policy Institute, Child Care Workers Aren't Paid Enough to Make Ends Meet (November 2015) examines child care workers' job quality, including how much they earn, whether they receive benefits on the job, and whether they and their families are able to make ends meet. Key findings include:

  • Child care workers are 95.6 percent female, and are disproportionately workers of color.
  • Child care workers receive very low pay.
  • Child care workers rarely receive job-based benefits.
  • Child care workers have a harder time making ends meet than workers in other occupations.
  • Over one-third (36.7 percent) of child care workers live in families with income below twice the poverty line, compared with 21.1 percent of workers in other occupations.
  • Many preschool and child care workers cannot afford child care for their own children

6. Infants and Toddlers in the Policy Picture: A Self-Assessment Toolkit for States

Source: ZERO TO THREE - November 19, 2015

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center has released Infants and Toddlers in the Policy Picture: A Self-Assessment Toolkit for States (2015) to help states evaluate progress toward building an effective early childhood system and set priorities for improvement. It focuses on four goals of a state early childhood system: good health, strong families, positive early learning experiences, and collaboration and system building. Users can easily access state information from national sources, assess how their state compares to other states, and gather stakeholder input.