May 8, 2015

In this Issue:

  1. Video-Enhanced Modules on Interventions for Toddlers with Autism
      Source: FPG Child Development Institute - May 7, 2015
  2. Future of Children: Policies to Promote Child Health
      Source: Princeton University and The Brookings Institution - May 7, 2015
  3. Parental Attachment and Child Development
      Source: Brookings Institute - April 21, 2015
  4. A National Picture of Early Head Start Programs and the Children and Families They Serve
      Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation - May 4, 2015
  5. Promising Evidence that Early Head Start Can Prevent Child Maltreatment
      Source: Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project - Retrieved May 7, 2015
  6. Grant Notice: Early Head Start University Partnerships
      Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - May 5, 2015

1. Video-Enhanced Modules on Interventions for Toddlers with Autism

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - May 7, 2015

New, free Video-Enhanced Modules on Interventions for Toddlers with Autism have been added to the collection of modules being developed by the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Toddler Initiative at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG). The focused intervention practices highlighted in these learning modules were identified from a review of the research literature conducted by staff of the National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorder (NPDC on ASD) in 2013-2014. They were found to be efficacious for use with toddlers as well as with other age groups of children with ASD.

2. Future of Children: Policies to Promote Child Health

Source: Princeton University and The Brookings Institution - May 7, 2015

The May 2015 issue of the Future of Children focuses on Policies to Promote Child Health. The issue reviews the strongest evidence to date on how best to promote child health and discusses what interventions and strategies work best at various stages of children's development. It includes articles specific to promoting child health in the early childhood years and the importance of family-centered programs and policies.

3. Parental Attachment and Child Development

Source: Brookings Institute - April 21, 2015

A recent blog post from the Brookings Institute, Getting attached: Parental attachment and child development (April 21, 2015), highlights findings from a three-decade longitudinal study of low-income children, which demonstrate the importance of an infant's early relationship with their caregiver for social and emotional development and how early attachment is significantly related to later success.

4. A National Picture of Early Head Start Programs and the Children and Families They Serve

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation - May 4, 2015

The Early Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (Baby FACES) collected information on 89 Early Head Start (EHS) programs, enrolled children, and their families. A new practitioner-friendly booklet, The Faces of Early Head Start: A National Picture of Early Head Start Programs and the Children and Families They Serve, presents data from Baby FACES, providing a descriptive picture of the children and families served by EHS, their well-being over the course of the program, and the services offered by programs to meet families' needs.

5. Promising Evidence that Early Head Start Can Prevent Child Maltreatment

Source: Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project - Retrieved May 7, 2015

A recently published brief highlights the results of a study of 1247 children and families who participated in the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project (EHSREP), funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Findings from the study suggest that Early Head Start may be effective in reducing child maltreatment among low-income children, in particular, physical and sexual abuse. To learn more see Research-to-Practice Brief: Promising Evidence that Early Head Start Can Prevent Child Maltreatment (March 2015).

6. Grant Notice: Early Head Start University Partnerships

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - May 5, 2015

On May 5, 2015, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services posted a new grant notice for Early Head Start University Partnerships: Building the Evidence Base for Infant/Toddler Center-based Programs. This grant program seeks to stimulate systematic, programmatic, multidisciplinary research to develop and test models of integrated interventions targeted at parents and teachers to promote infant and toddler development across multiple domains including cognitive, language, and social-emotional/behavioral development.