December 5, 2014

In this Issue:

  1. Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2014
      Source: Child Care Aware - December 3, 2014
  2. The Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge Year Two Progress Report
      Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - December 2, 2014
  3. Feedback Requested on IDEA Part C Results Data in Determinations
      Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs - Retrieved December 1, 2014
  4. New Videos for Practicing Observation, Documentation and Assessment Skills
      Source: Results Matter - December 1, 2014
  5. Fact Sheet: State of Young Hispanic Children
      Source: Child Trends - November 24, 2014
  6. Characteristics of Center-based Early Care and Education Programs
      Source: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation - December 4, 2014

1. Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2014

Source: Child Care Aware - December 3, 2014

Child Care Aware has published its eighth annual report highlighting significant trends related to America's child care costs. Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2014 (December 2014) finds that the cost of child care in the United States can be as much as $14,508 annually for an infant, or $12,280 annually for a four-year-old in a center, and that does not always guarantee a quality environment. The cost of child care often exceeds the cost of housing, college tuition, transportation or food. This year's report provides recommendations and examines the importance of child care as a workforce support and as an early learning program.

2. The Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge Year Two Progress Report

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - December 2, 2014

The U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services have published a new report highlighting progress from 14 states that were awarded Race to the Top- Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) grants in 2012 and 2013. The report shows that these states are improving the quality of their early learning programs and more at-risk children are attending high-quality centers. The RTT-ELC program was authorized by Congress in 2011 to support states' efforts to design and implement integrated systems of high-quality early learning programs and services so that more children from birth through age 5 would be provided with a strong foundation for success in school and beyond.

This report and the states' individual RTT-ELC Annual Performance Reports are available at https://elc.grads360.org/#program/annual-performance-reports and also at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/racetothetop-earlylearningchallenge/performance.html.

3. Feedback Requested on IDEA Part C Results Data in Determinations

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs - Retrieved December 1, 2014

The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) is seeking feedback on a proposed approach for using results data to review states' performance results for children who receive early intervention services under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). What are the pros and cons of the proposed approach? Are there other data sources that should be considered? Learn more and provide feedback here. Comments must be submitted by December 12, 2014.

4. New Videos for Practicing Observation, Documentation and Assessment Skills

Source: Results Matter - December 1, 2014

Results Matter, a program of the Colorado Department of Education, recently posted two new videos in their Results Matter Video Library.

  • Abigail and Samantha Working on Computers (Runtime: 3:16) - Preschoolers Abigail and Samantha demonstrate a variety of cognitive, digital, communication, and social skills while playing with computer games next to each other.
  • At the Breakfast Table (Runtime: 3:07) - Preschoolers Mariyam, Mical, and Asli demonstrate a variety of self-help, manipulative, communication, and social skills at the breakfast table.

These videos were produced to be used in professional development activities to provide early care and education providers opportunities to practice observation, documentation, and assessment skills. They can be viewed online and downloaded at no cost for use in educational and professional development activities from the Clips for Practicing Observation, Documentation and Assessment Skills section of the library.

5. Fact Sheet: State of Young Hispanic Children

Source: Child Trends - November 24, 2014

A new fact sheet from the Child Trends Hispanic Institute, State of Young Hispanic Children (November 2014) provides information about demographics, education, the family, and the health of Hispanic children.

6. Characteristics of Center-based Early Care and Education Programs

Source: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation - December 4, 2014

A new technical report, Characteristics of Center-based Early Care and Education Programs: Initial Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) (December 2014) describes the current landscape of center-based early care and education (ECE) programs in this country. The report uses data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). The 129,000 center-based programs described serve 6.98 million children birth through age five years not yet in kindergarten. The programs are described by such key characteristics as enrollment size, ages of children served, auspice, revenue sources, and sponsorship and hours of operation. The report was published by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.