October 17, 2014

In this Issue:

  1. Common Education Data Standards (CEDS) - Version 5 Available for Public Comment
      Source: Common Education Data Standards Project - October 17, 2014
  2. Culture Counts: Engaging Black and Latino Parents of Young Children in Family Support Programs
      Source: Child Trends - October 16, 2014
  3. Early Literacy Toolkit from the American Academy of Pediatrics
      Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - October 13, 2014
  4. Redefining Developmentally Appropriate Technology Use in Early Childhood Education
      Source: RAND Corporation - Retrieved October 13, 2014
  5. Summaries of Programs That Work from the Promising Practices Network
      Source: RAND Corporation - Retrieved October 13, 2014
  6. 2014 Diversity/Equity Learning Table: Materials Now Available Online
      Source: BUILD Initiative and QRIS National Learning Network - October 17, 2014

1. Common Education Data Standards (CEDS) - Version 5 Available for Public Comment

Source: Common Education Data Standards Project - October 17, 2014

The Common Education Data Standards (CEDS) project is a national collaborative effort to develop voluntary, common data standards for a key set of education data elements to enable more consistent and comparable data to be used throughout all education levels and sectors, both within and across states. A draft Version 5 of the Common Education Data Standards is now available for public comment online until November 13, 2014. The Version 5 draft spans P-20W (early learning through workforce). New and updated early learning elements can be viewed by selecting "Early Learning" in the "Filter by Domain" drop-down menu and then "new" or "updated" CEDS elements. Instructions for submitting comments are available at https://ceds.ed.gov/commentInfo.aspx.

2. Culture Counts: Engaging Black and Latino Parents of Young Children in Family Support Programs

Source: Child Trends - October 16, 2014

Child Trends has published a new report focused on family support programs and strategies for reaching and engaging black and Latino families, with the ultimate goal of supporting young children's development. Culture Counts: Engaging Black and Latino Parents of Young Children in Family Support Programs (October 2014) presents a synthesis of available research on parent engagement and potential barriers to parent engagement in family support programs and provides recommendations for designing, adapting, and evaluating programs with culture in mind. It was funded by the Alliance for Early Success.

3. Early Literacy Toolkit from the American Academy of Pediatrics

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - October 13, 2014

On October 12, 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a toolkit with information and resources for pediatric health care professionals and families about the benefits of promoting early literacy and early learning for children. The Books Build Connections Toolkit also provides tips and publications to help encourage families to talk, read, and sing with their children. The toolkit is a follow-up to the AAP policy statement on promoting early literacy that was released in June 2014.

4. Redefining Developmentally Appropriate Technology Use in Early Childhood Education

Source: RAND Corporation - Retrieved October 13, 2014

A new policy brief from the RAND Corporation, Moving Beyond Screen Time Redefining Developmentally Appropriate Technology Use in Early Childhood Education (2014), challenges the traditional emphasis on screen time when discussing the use of technology in early childhood education. The authors argue that a more comprehensive definition of what constitutes developmentally appropriate technology use for young children should take into account the following six considerations:

  • Is it purposefully integrated to support learning?
  • Is the use solitary or taking place with others?
  • Is the activity sedentary or mobile?
  • What are the content and features of the media?
  • Are the device's features age-appropriate?
  • What is the total screen time involved?

5. Summaries of Programs That Work from the Promising Practices Network

Source: RAND Corporation - Retrieved October 13, 2014

Between 1998 and 2014, the Promising Practices Network (PPN) on Children, Families and Communities (www.promisingpractices.net) provided information on programs and practices that credible research indicated are effective in improving outcomes for children, youth, and families. A new publication from the RAND Corporation, Programs That Work, from the Promising Practices Network on Children, Families and Communities (2014), includes summaries of all of the programs that were reviewed by the PPN and met the criteria for a Promising or Proven program, as listed on the PPN website in June 2014, when the project ended. Programs are listed by categories, such as age of the child when the intervention takes place, delivery setting, and outcomes improved.

6. 2014 Diversity/Equity Learning Table: Materials Now Available Online

Source: BUILD Initiative and QRIS National Learning Network - October 17, 2014

From May to September 2014, six states participated in a BUILD Initiative and QRIS National Learning Network-supported Learning Table on the topic of assuring that state Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRISs) are responsive to children who are culturally, linguistically and socio-economically diverse. Materials from the 2014 Diversity/Equity Learning Table are now available online. They include PowerPoint presentations, curated topical resource lists, briefs, reports, articles, and state examples.