July 18, 2014

In this Issue:

  1. Side-By-Side of IDEA and FERPA Confidentiality Provisions
      Source: U.S. Department of Education - Retrieved July 16, 2014
  2. The Health and Well-Being of Children, NSCH 2011-2012 Chartbook
      Source: Maternal and Child Health Bureau - July 11, 2014
  3. New Briefs on Early Care and Education Quality Improvement
      Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - July 14, 2014
  4. Beyond Subprime Learning: Accelerating Progress in Early Education
      Source: New America Foundation - July 16, 2014
  5. Mother's Education and Children's Outcomes
      Source: Foundation for Child Development - July 16, 2014

1. Side-By-Side of IDEA and FERPA Confidentiality Provisions

Source: U.S. Department of Education - Retrieved July 16, 2014

The U.S. Department of Education recently published IDEA and FERPA Confidentiality Provisions (June 2014), a side-by-side comparison of the primary legal provisions and definitions in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Parts B and C and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) that relate to the confidentiality of personally identifiable information of children served under the IDEA.

2. The Health and Well-Being of Children, NSCH 2011-2012 Chartbook

Source: Maternal and Child Health Bureau - July 11, 2014

The Maternal and Child Health Bureau recently published its latest chartbook of findings from the National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH). The Health and Well-Being of Children: A Portrait of States and the Nation 2011-2012 (June 2014) reports that overall 73.2% of young children (aged 6 months-5 years) met all of the survey's criteria for flourishing. The parents of 30.8% of children aged 10 months-5 years reported that they received a standardized developmental screening. Children with low household incomes were most likely to receive early intervention and special education services. Of children from age 1 until 3 years, 3.1% received early intervention services, while 6.6% of children from age 3 until age 6 received special education services. Boys were more likely to receive special education services than girls (8.3% versus 4.8% for preschool-aged children). The concerns of the parents of 26.2% of children aged 4 months to 5 years indicated that their child is at moderate or high risk of developmental delay.

3. New Briefs on Early Care and Education Quality Improvement

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - July 14, 2014

On July 14, 2014, the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released the following new briefs related to early care and education quality improvement:

4. Beyond Subprime Learning: Accelerating Progress in Early Education

Source: New America Foundation - July 16, 2014

The New America Foundation has published a new report, Beyond Subprime Learning: Accelerating Progress in Early Education (2014), by Laura Bornfreund, Clare McCann, Conor Williams, and Lisa Guernsey. The report provides eight recommendations for improving aligned, high-quality early education from birth through third grade. Each recommendation includes steps that can be taken by the various stakeholders who would be primarily responsible for a given intervention. It is a follow-up to an earlier report, Subprime Learning: Early Education in America Since the Great Recession (January, 2014).

5. Mother's Education and Children's Outcomes

Source: Foundation for Child Development - July 16, 2014

The Foundation for Child Development (FCD) recently published a new report, Mother's Education and Children's Outcomes: How Dual-Generation Programs Offer Increased Opportunities for America's Children (July 2014) which provides an analysis of 13 economic, education, and health indicators for children whose mothers have not graduated from high school, compared to children whose mothers have higher levels of education. The report highlights the value and need for comprehensive dual-generation strategies, which focus simultaneously on both children and parents, to better enable low-income children and families to overcome barriers to success. It is the second in a series of FCD reports on Disparities Among America's Children.