May 9, 2014

In this Issue:

  1. State of Preschool 2013: First Look
      Source: Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics - May 8, 2014
  2. Helping Parents, Helping Children: Two-Generation Mechanisms
      Source: Future of Children - May 7, 2014
  3. Parent Guides on Special Education Dispute Resolution
      Source: National Center on Dispute Resolution in Special Education - May 7, 2014
  4. Making the Link Between Health and School Readiness
      Source: Office of Head Star, National Center on Health - May 2, 2014
  5. Tips for Keeping Children Safe: A Developmental Guide
      Source: Office of Head Start, National Center on Health - May 7, 2014
  6. Preschool Development Grants Executive Summaries Posted for Comment
      Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - May 5, 2014

1. State of Preschool 2013: First Look

Source: Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics - May 8, 2014

A new report, State of Preschool 2013: First Look (May 2014) presents data about state supported preschool enrollment and the funding of preschool programs at the state and national levels for the 2012-13 school year. The information provided is based on data collected through the State of Preschool 2012-13 data collection from the National Center for Education Statistics within the Institute of Education Sciences. Some highlights include:

  • Forty states and the District of Columbia had state supported programs in place in 2012-13.
  • State-funded preschool served 1.34 million children in these states.
  • Total expenditures from all identified sources supporting state preschool programs equaled $6.2 billion, representing a decrease from the previous year's inflation-adjusted total of $6.39 billion.

2. Helping Parents, Helping Children: Two-Generation Mechanisms

Source: Future of Children - May 7, 2014

The Spring 2014 issue of Future of Children, Helping Parents, Helping Children: Two-Generation Mechanisms (Vol. 24, Issue 1), focuses on programs that simultaneously serve disadvantaged parents and children with high-quality interventions. Because the home environment is so important for children's development, many people think such "two-generation" programs can be more effective and efficient than programs serving children and parents individually. The issue discusses six mechanisms through which parents and the home environment are thought to influence children's development: stress, education, health, income, employment, and assets. See also, the accompanying policy brief, Early Stress Gets under the Skin: Promising Initiatives to Help Children Facing Chronic Adversity (Spring 2014), by Ross A. Thompson and Ron Haskins.

3. Parent Guides on Special Education Dispute Resolution

Source: National Center on Dispute Resolution in Special Education - May 7, 2014

Four Parent Guides on Dispute Resolution options under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) are now available from the National Center on Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE) in both English and Spanish. The guides are intended for parents of children ages 3-21. The topics covered include mediation, due process hearings, written State complaints, and resolution meetings. On May 29, 2014, CADRE will host a free webinar on using the guides from 2:30 p.m -3:45 p.m. ET (11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. PT).

4. Making the Link Between Health and School Readiness

Source: Office of Head Star, National Center on Health - May 2, 2014

Promoting healthy development and treating children's health issues enhances their readiness for school. The Office of Head Start's National Center on Health recently released a new interactive online tool, Making the Link Between Health and School Readiness (2014), which is designed to help early childhood program leaders integrate meaningful health strategies with school readiness goals.

5. Tips for Keeping Children Safe: A Developmental Guide

Source: Office of Head Start, National Center on Health - May 7, 2014

A new resource, Tips for Keeping Children Safe: A Developmental Guide (2014), describes daily routines for children within four age groups (infants, mobile infants, toddlers, and preschoolers) and provides safety tips that specifically address the developmental needs of children in a specific age group, as well as tips that apply to all children. It was developed by the Office of Head Start's National Center on Health for early childhood staff working with young children in classroom environments.

6. Preschool Development Grants Executive Summaries Posted for Comment

Source: U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - May 5, 2014

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 provides $250 million to support efforts to build, develop and expand voluntary, high-quality preschool programs. States will be eligible to apply for two proposed types of discretionary grants through the Preschool Development Grants competition: Development Grants and Expansion Grants. After reviewing over five hundred comments from the public, the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services have developed executive summaries with draft requirements, priorities, selection criteria, and definitions for both types of competitions. These are now available for public input until 5:00 p.m. ET on May 16, 2014 - see the Development Grants Executive Summary and the Expansion Grants Executive Summary. On Monday, May 12, 2014 from 3:00-4:00 p.m. ET, the Departments will hold an informational Webinar on the competition. Learn more here.