March 14, 2014

In this Issue:

  1. State of the States Policy Snapshot: State Early Childhood Assessment Policies
      Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes - Retrieved March 14, 2014
  2. 2013 State of States' Early Childhood Data Systems
      Source: Early Childhood Data Collaborative - Retrieved March 10, 2014
  3. Position Statement on Early Childhood Science Education
      Source: National Science Teachers Association - Retrieved March 11, 2014
  4. The Spectrum of Neglect: Four Types of Unresponsive Care
      Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University - March 11, 2014
  5. Reflections on Play: A Resource Guide
      Source: National Institute for Early Education Research - March 7, 2014
  6. Updated! Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain
      Source: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child - March 11, 2014
  7. Report on Two-Generation Approaches to Supporting Children and Parents Together
      Source: Ascend at the Aspen Institute - Retrieved March 14, 2014
  8. Child Care Assistance Spending and Participation in 2012: A Record Low
      Source: CLASP - Retrieved March 10, 2014
  9. A Fifteen- Year (1997- 2012) Profile Of Children's Overall Health
      Source: Child Trends - Retrieved March 14, 2014
  10. Promoting Health Equity Through Full-Day Kindergarten Programs
      Source: Community Preventive Services Task Force - Retrieved March 14, 2014
  11. Lessons for the Nation from One State's Experience with Full-Day Kindergarten
      Source: New America Foundation - Retrieved March 12, 2014
  12. New! Standards for Systems of Care for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs
      Source: Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs - March 13, 2014
  13. Additional Public Comment Sought for Preschool Development Grants Competition
      Source: Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - March 10, 2014

1. State of the States Policy Snapshot: State Early Childhood Assessment Policies

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes - Retrieved March 14, 2014

The Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) recently published a new brief that looks at what child assessment measures are being used in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten classrooms across the states and how child assessment data is being used. State of the States Policy Snapshot: State Early Childhood Assessment Policies (March 2014), by Diane Schilder and Megan E. Carolan, is intended to help states learn from each other as they plan to implement new assessments (e.g. kindergarten entry assessments) and comprehensive early childhood assessment systems. It is based primarily on secondary analysis of data collected in the State of Preschool Yearbook and presents a snapshot of responses from the states to questions about child assessment.

2. 2013 State of States' Early Childhood Data Systems

Source: Early Childhood Data Collaborative - Retrieved March 10, 2014

The Early Childhood Data Collaborative recently released The 2013 State of States' Early Childhood Data Systems (February 2014), a new report of findings based on a survey of 50 states and the District of Columbia, assessing the coordination of their early childhood data systems. The survey was completed by state education, health, and social services program staff. It focused on these three key aspects of state data systems:

  1. Do states have the ability to securely link child level data across early care and education (ECE) programs and to other state data systems, including K-12, health, and social services?
  2. Do states collect developmental screening, assessment, and kindergarten entry data to examine children's developmental status and service needs?
  3. Do states have an ECE data governance structure designated to support the development and use of a coordinated longitudinal ECE data system?

Findings show that although federal and state agencies do collect data on an array of ECE programs, Pennsylvania is the only state that links child-level data across all programs and to the state's K-12 data system. Twenty-six states can link child-level data between at least two publicly funded early care and education programs. To learn more, see the full report.

3. Position Statement on Early Childhood Science Education

Source: National Science Teachers Association - Retrieved March 11, 2014

The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recently published a Position Statement on Early Childhood Science Education (2014). The position statement identifies key principles to guide the learning of science among young children and provides recommendations for teachers and other education providers who support children's learning in early childhood settings.

4. The Spectrum of Neglect: Four Types of Unresponsive Care

Source: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University - March 11, 2014

Using science as a guide, a new interactive feature from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University describes four types of unresponsive care and their consequences. It also provides tips on what can be done to protect vulnerable children from this complex challenge. It includes four short video clips, each under a minute in length. To learn more, see The Spectrum of Neglect: Four Types of Unresponsive Care.

5. Reflections on Play: A Resource Guide

Source: National Institute for Early Education Research - March 7, 2014

The National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) recently hosted a two-week blog forum on the importance of play in early childhood education. A series of posts from experts in the field are now available on a new Webpage entitled Reflections on Play: A Resource Guide. The page also contains links to additional resources on play in preschool.

6. Updated! Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain

Source: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child - March 11, 2014

An updated edition of Working Paper 3: Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain (2014) from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child is now available. Incorporating the latest scientific research, the paper explains how significant adversity early in life can alter a child's capacity to learn and to adapt to stressful situations, how sensitive and responsive caregiving can buffer the effects of such stress, and how policies could be shaped to minimize the disruptive impacts of toxic stress on young children.

7. Report on Two-Generation Approaches to Supporting Children and Parents Together

Source: Ascend at the Aspen Institute - Retrieved March 14, 2014

Ascend at the Aspen Institute recently released a new report entitled Gateways to Two Generations: The Potential for Early Childhood Programs and Partnerships to Support Children and Parents Together (2014). The report looks at how leading early childhood programs are supporting families' educational success and economic security by providing more than just care and education for children. It documents the evolution of early childhood efforts and support for parents and emphasizes the importance of partnerships for two-generation approaches that support both children and their parents together.

8. Child Care Assistance Spending and Participation in 2012: A Record Low

Source: CLASP - Retrieved March 10, 2014

Child care subsidies are meant to help make quality child care affordable for low-income parents, allowing them to attend work or school while ensuring their children's healthy development. Access to quality child care has also been shown to strengthen families' economic security. A new analysis from CLASP finds that state spending on child care assistance, including funds from the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) and the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, was at a 10-year low in 2012 and the number of children receiving CCDBG-funded assistance was at a 14-year low. Since 2006, the number of children receiving CCDBG-funded child care has fallen by approximately 263,000 children. The analysis is based on the most recent state data available from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. To learn more, see Child Care Assistance Spending and Participation in 2012: A Record Low (February 2014) by Hannah Matthews and Stephanie Schmit.

9. A Fifteen- Year (1997- 2012) Profile Of Children's Overall Health

Source: Child Trends - Retrieved March 14, 2014

Child Trends has published a new research brief, A Fifteen- Year (1997- 2012) Profile Of Children's Overall Health: National and State Estimates, by Family Income Level (March 2014), which tracks trends in health status for children between 1997 and 2012. Findings show that the majority of U.S. children are in very good or excellent health, according to parental report. However, children in non-low-income families are more likely to be healthy by this measure than are their low-income peers. This infographic provides some highlights. Between 1997 and 2011/12, the proportion of low-income children in excellent or very good health rose three percentage points. Among more affluent children, the proportion rose by 1.5 points.

10. Promoting Health Equity Through Full-Day Kindergarten Programs

Source: Community Preventive Services Task Force - Retrieved March 14, 2014

The Community Preventive Services Task Force was established in 1996 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to identify population health interventions that are scientifically proven to save lives, increase lifespans, and improve quality of life. The Task Force recently published the following articles in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (March 2014) related to promoting health equity for low-income and minority children through full-day kindergarten programs.

To learn more, go to http://www.thecommunityguide.org/healthequity/education/fulldaykindergarten.html.

11. Lessons for the Nation from One State's Experience with Full-Day Kindergarten

Source: New America Foundation - Retrieved March 12, 2014

The New America Foundation recently released a new report, Raising Arizona: Lessons for the Nation from a State's Experience with Full-Day Kindergarten (February 2014). The report describes the kindergarten landscape across the country and research supporting full-day kindergarten. It also examines Arizona's experiences implementing full-day kindergarten and offers lessons learned for policymakers across the country who are considering whether, and how, to expand the provision of and funding for full-day kindergarten.

12. New! Standards for Systems of Care for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs

Source: Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs - March 13, 2014

On March 13, 2014, the Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs (AMCHP), with support from the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, released a groundbreaking set of Standards for Systems of Care for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) and a companion background white paper. The standards address the core components of the structure and process of an effective system of care for CYSHCN. They were derived from a comprehensive review of the literature, guidance from more than 30 key informants, case studies of standards currently in use within selected sites, and input and guidance from a national work group of relevant stakeholders. The goal of the standards is to improve health care quality and health outcomes for CYSHCN and to reduce health care costs. The system standards were fully vetted by the national work group members. They are intended for use or adaptation by a wide range of stakeholders at the national, state and local levels.

13. Additional Public Comment Sought for Preschool Development Grants Competition

Source: Departments of Education and Health and Human Services - March 10, 2014

The Departments of Education (ED) and Health and Human Services (HHS) are seeking additional input from the public on the new $250 million Preschool Development Grants competition, appropriated in the FY14 Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 (Public Law 113-76). There is now a dedicated website for this purpose. There will also be public meeting on Thursday, March 20, 2014 from 3:30 p.m. 5:00 p.m. at the Department of Education. You can view the live streamed session at http://edstream.ed.gov/webcast/Play/06af25dead644f46b2e786e7683e87051d