December 13, 2013

In this Issue:

  1. Key Components of Collaboration in the Early Childhood Field
      Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - December 12, 2013
  2. National Program Standards Crosswalk Tool
      Source: Office of Child Care - December 13, 2013
  3. Child Development and Early Learning Framework Video
      Source: Office of Head Start - December 13, 2013
  4. 2013 Child Well-Being Index
      Source: Foundation for Child Development - December 11, 2013
  5. Confronting the Child Care Eligibility Maze
      Source: Urban Institute and the Center for Law and Social Policy - December 9, 2013

1. Key Components of Collaboration in the Early Childhood Field

Source: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation - December 12, 2013

In recent years, there has been an increasing emphasis on coordination and collaboration across early care and education sectors to provide consistent, high-quality services for families with young children. A new research brief, Conceptualizing and Measuring Collaboration in the Context of Early Childhood Care and Education (OPRE Research Brief 2013-29, November 2013), identifies key components of collaboration and encourages the development and use of measures of collaboration in the early childhood field. The authors also provide recommendations for future research. The paper was prepared under the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation's (OPRE's) Child Care and Early Education Policy and Research Analysis and Technical Expertise Project with Child Trends.

2. National Program Standards Crosswalk Tool

Source: Office of Child Care - December 13, 2013

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Child Care (OCC) recently announced the availability of a new resource, the National Program Standards Crosswalk Tool. The early care and education field has multiple sets of program standards and the content of those standards varies widely. The Crosswalk Tool was developed through a public-private partnership to help states that are developing and aligning early childhood (EC) program standards across sectors. It allows users to review and compare the content of various program standards available in the field. It was developed for OCC by the National Center on Child Care Quality Improvement (NCCCQI), with the collaboration and cooperation of a number of different agencies and organizations.

3. Child Development and Early Learning Framework Video

Source: Office of Head Start - December 13, 2013

The Head Start Approach to School Readiness encompasses three major frameworks that promote an understanding of school readiness for parents and families, infants/toddlers, and preschoolers. The Office of Head Start recently published a new 19 minute video describing one of the three frameworks, the Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework. This framework identifies 11 key domains of learning and development for children ages 3 to 5 years old, including dual language learners and children with disabilities. All of the domains are illustrated in the video by children and teachers from Head Start programs across the country.

4. 2013 Child Well-Being Index

Source: Foundation for Child Development - December 11, 2013

One December 11, 2013, the Foundation for Child Development released its 2013 Child Well-Being Index (CWI) (December 2013). The CWI highlights trends from 1975-2012 across 28 key indicators of child well-being grouped into 7 domains: Family Economic Well-Being, Safe/Risky Behavior, Social Relationships, Emotional/Spiritual Well-Being, Community Engagement, Educational Attainment, and Health. Although gains have been made in some areas, such as higher prekindergarten enrollment rates and lower teenage birth rates; overall, the CWI shows little improvement compared with the base year, 1975.

5. Confronting the Child Care Eligibility Maze

Source: Urban Institute and the Center for Law and Social Policy - December 9, 2013

The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) has two program goals: to help parents become or remain employed, and to support the safety and development of their children. However, complex administrative processes can make it difficult for low-income families to get and keep child care and other benefits (i.e. health coverage, nutrition benefits). The Urban Institute and the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) recently released a report, Confronting the Child Care Eligibility Maze: Simplifying and Aligning With Other Work Supports (December 2013), which outlines steps states can take to make it easier for eligible families to apply for and be connected to child care and the larger package of benefits for which they are eligible. The report provides concrete policy ideas and examples from states across the country.