November 22, 2013

In this Issue:

  1. Equity and Excellence: African-American Children's Access to Quality Preschool
      Source: NIEER, CEELO and WHIEEAA - November 18, 2013
  2. New Series of Briefs on Supporting Babies Through QRIS
      Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - November 21, 2013
  3. Making the Case for Early Childhood Intervention in Child Welfare
      Source: Anne E. Casey Foundation - Retrieved November 21, 2013
  4. The Importance of Family Engagement in Infant and Toddler Programs
      Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - November 20, 2013
  5. Supplement Provides Information about Home Visiting Programs and Early Childhood
      Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved November 22, 2013
  6. Resources to Meet the Needs of Young Children of Veteran Families
      Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - November 21, 2013
  7. Making Life Easier: Holidays-Strategies for Success
      Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - November 21, 2013

1. Equity and Excellence: African-American Children's Access to Quality Preschool

Source: NIEER, CEELO and WHIEEAA - November 18, 2013

The National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER), the Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO), and the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African-Americans (WHIEEAA) recently published a new paper, Equity and Excellence: African-American Children's Access to Quality Preschool (November 2013), by Steve Barnett, Megan Carolan and David Johns. The paper discusses the lack of access to high-quality early childhood education experiences for African-American children and offers recommendations to expand opportunities. Dorothy Strickland, Distinguished Research Fellow at NIEER, explores key points of the paper in a new blog post.

2. New Series of Briefs on Supporting Babies Through QRIS

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - November 21, 2013

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center has released the first two documents of a new series, Supporting Babies Through QRIS. The series is meant to help ensure that Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) are supporting the unique developmental needs of infants and toddlers. The documents present a national review of states' and jurisdictions' QRIS that have been implemented statewide and illustrates some examples of QRIS standards and supports that have been included across the nation to help programs promote young children's development and learning.

3. Making the Case for Early Childhood Intervention in Child Welfare

Source: Anne E. Casey Foundation - Retrieved November 21, 2013

Recent data suggest that infants and toddlers make up one-fourth to one-third of the children who are abused or neglected annually and are the largest group entering out-of-home care. They are also more likely to experience recurrent maltreatment and remain in out-of-home care longer than older children. Children under six constitute 47% of foster care entries. The Anne E. Casey Foundation has released a brief, Making the Case for Early Childhood Intervention in Child Welfare (October 2013), which describes a national scan of interventions targeting families with young children and makes recommendations to safely reduce the number of young children in foster care. It suggests that because early childhood is a foundational period of development, addressing the unique needs of this population is a tremendous opportunity to improve child welfare systems and the health and well-being of young children.

4. The Importance of Family Engagement in Infant and Toddler Programs

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - November 20, 2013

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) recently released a new paper, Promote Family Engagement (2013), which discusses the importance of family engagement in child care and early education programs serving infants and toddlers. The paper provides research documenting the importance of strengthening family engagement, policy recommendations states can consider to enhance family engagement strategies, and other resources. It was published as part of CLASP'S Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project, an effort to link research to policy ideas to help states make the best decisions for infants and toddlers in child care.

5. Supplement Provides Information about Home Visiting Programs and Early Childhood

Source: Pediatrics - Retrieved November 22, 2013

A supplement to the November 2013 issue of Pediatrics is dedicated to the topic of home visiting and early childhood. Articles address topics such as the effectiveness of home visiting in improving child health and reducing child maltreatment, improving nurse-family partnerships, maternal depression, home visiting in partnership with pediatric care, a cell phone-enhanced home visiting parenting intervention, integrating home visiting into medical care of infants born to young mothers, and enhancing home visiting with mental health consultation. The supplement was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics and sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Administration for Children and Families.

6. Resources to Meet the Needs of Young Children of Veteran Families

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - November 21, 2013

This month, ZERO TO THREE released a series of resources to meet the needs and interests of the young children of veteran families and the professionals who serve them. It includes a professional guide, parent booklets, and flyers.

7. Making Life Easier: Holidays-Strategies for Success

Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - November 21, 2013

The Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI) has recently added a new tip sheet in its Making Life Easier series, entitled Making Life Easier: Holidays-Strategies for Success (November 2013). This series of tip sheets is designed specifically for parents and caregivers. It contains valuable information on how to make often challenging events easier to navigate, and even enjoyable, for both caregivers and children.