October 25, 2013

In this Issue:

  1. Being Black Is Not a Risk Factor: A Strengths-Based Look at the State of the Black Child
      Source: National Black Child Development Institute - Retrieved October 23, 2013
  2. The Research Base for a Birth through Age Eight State Policy Framework
      Source: Alliance for Early Success and Child Trends - October 23, 2013
  3. Child Care in America: 2013 State Fact Sheets
      Source: Child Care Aware of America - October 15, 2013
  4. Pivot Point: State Child Care Assistance Policies 2013
      Source: National Women's Law Center - October 23, 2013

1. Being Black Is Not a Risk Factor: A Strengths-Based Look at the State of the Black Child

Source: National Black Child Development Institute - Retrieved October 23, 2013

The National Black Child Development Institute (NBCDI) recently published a new paper, Being Black Is Not a Risk Factor: A Strengths-Based Look at the State of the Black Child (2013). While recognizing the challenges facing African American children and the failure of various systems to address their needs, the report challenges the prevailing discourse about Black children, which overemphasizes limitations and deficits. Instead, it focuses on the considerable strengths, assets and resilience demonstrated by Black children and families. It includes:

  • Essays from experts that focus on using children's, families' and communities' strengths to improve outcomes for Black children
  • "Points of Proof" from organizations that serve not as exceptions, but as examples of places where Black children and families are succeeding
  • Data points that indicate how Black children and families are doing across a range of measures

2. The Research Base for a Birth through Age Eight State Policy Framework

Source: Alliance for Early Success and Child Trends - October 23, 2013

The Alliance for Early Success and Child Trends recently published a new report The Research Base for a Birth through Age Eight State Policy Framework (2013). The report complements the Alliance's Birth Through Age Eight State Policy Framework, a collective work of more than 150 experts that builds on decades of research and theory identifying the essential supports needed for children's development. The framework emphasizes health, family support, and learning as critical policy areas, and standards, assessment practices, and accountability systems as critical foundations to implement the policies. This new report provides the evidence base for the framework.

3. Child Care in America: 2013 State Fact Sheets

Source: Child Care Aware of America - October 15, 2013

Child Care Aware of America (formerly NACCRRA, the National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies), recently released Child Care in America: 2013 State Fact Sheets. This annual report provides data on:

  • Family characteristics related to the need for child care
  • The use of child care
  • The supply of child care
  • The cost of child care
  • The child care workforce
  • Services provided by Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&Rs)

This year's report finds that almost 11 million children younger than age 5 with working mothers are in child care and 27% of these children are in multiple child care arrangements. On average, these children spend 36 hours a week in child care. The average annual cost of full-time care for an infant in center-based care ranges from about $4,850 in Mississippi to $16,450 in Massachusetts. For a 4-year-old, center-based care ranges from about $4,300 in Mississippi to $12,350 in Massachusetts.

4. Pivot Point: State Child Care Assistance Policies 2013

Source: National Women's Law Center - October 23, 2013

The National Women's Law Center has released its latest annual state-by-state report examining five critical factors that affect the help families can get in paying for child care. This year's report, Pivot Point: State Child Care Assistance Policies 2013, found that families are better off in 27 states under one or more key child care policies than they were last year; however in 24 states families are doing worse. These findings are more positive than in the previous two years, when the situation worsened for families in more states than it improved. Some key findings include:

  • Nineteen states have waiting lists for child care assistance, a decrease from 23 states in 2012.
  • Only three states pay rates at the federally recommended level, a sharp decline from 2001 when 22 states had rates at the recommended level.
  • A family with an income above 150% of poverty ($29,295/year for a family of three) could not qualify for child care assistance in 14 states. A family with an income above 200% of poverty ($39,060/year for a family of three) could not qualify for assistance in 38 states.