October 11, 2013

In this Issue:

  1. New AAP Report on Early Intervention, IDEA Part C Services, and the Medical Home
      Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - October 1, 2013
  2. New Briefs Focus on Specific Child Welfare Needs of Infants and Toddlers
      Source: ZERO TO THREE and Child Trends - October 10, 2013
  3. Kids' Share 2013: Report on Federal Expenditures on Children through 2012
      Source: Urban Institute - Retrieved October 11, 2013
  4. Policy Statement on Enhancing Pediatric Workforce Diversity and Providing Culturally Effective Pediatric Care
      Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - October 1, 2013

1. New AAP Report on Early Intervention, IDEA Part C Services, and the Medical Home

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - October 1, 2013

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has published a new clinical report, entitled Early Intervention, IDEA Part C Services, and the Medical Home: Collaboration for Best Practice and Best Outcomes (published online September 30, 2013). The report:

  1. Reviews the common core components of the medical home and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part C Early Intervention (EI) Program;
  2. Summarizes evidence related to the value of the medical home and EI programs for infants and toddlers with special needs;
  3. Provides pediatricians with information on evidence-based best-practice models for effective EI;
  4. Highlights systematic barriers to identification/integration of infants in EI services; and
  5. Provides resources for medical home personnel and families to support the collaboration of medical homes and Part C EI programs.

2. New Briefs Focus on Specific Child Welfare Needs of Infants and Toddlers

Source: ZERO TO THREE and Child Trends - October 10, 2013

ZERO TO THREE and Child Trends have released three new short briefs that focus on specific issues related to infants and toddlers in the child welfare system. These pieces are based on findings from a March 2013 survey of state child welfare agencies related to the policies and practices that guide their work in addressing the needs of infants and toddlers who have been maltreated.

See also, the related full report of findings from the survey, which was highlighted in the September 27, 2013 issue of eNotes - Changing the Course for Infants and Toddlers: A Survey of State Child Welfare Policies and Initiatives (September 2013).

3. Kids' Share 2013: Report on Federal Expenditures on Children through 2012

Source: Urban Institute - Retrieved October 11, 2013

The Urban Institute recently published Kids' Share 2013: Federal Expenditures on Children in 2012 and Future Projections (2013), by Julia Isaacs, Sara Edelstein, Heather Hahn, Katherine Toran and C. Eugene Steuerle. This is the seventh in a series of annual analyses of federal spending and tax investments in children and families. This year's report finds that federal spending on children fell by $28 billion, or 7%, in 2012, the largest single-year reduction since the early 1980s. Although the decline is mostly explained by the phasing out of funds under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), the authors find that spending on children will continue to be restricted in upcoming years. While total federal spending is projected to increase by more than $1 trillion over the next ten years, children's programs will get only 2 cents on every dollar of this projected increase.

4. Policy Statement on Enhancing Pediatric Workforce Diversity and Providing Culturally Effective Pediatric Care

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - October 1, 2013

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has released a new policy statement, Enhancing Pediatric Workforce Diversity and Providing Culturally Effective Pediatric Care: Implications for Practice, Education, and Policy Making (published online September 30, 2013), which combines and updates 2 previous statements from the AAP on culturally effective health care and workforce diversity. The statement addresses the ever-increasing diversity of children in the U.S. and the importance of physician knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of all cultural distinctions to achieve optimal health outcomes and quality of life for these children.