October 4, 2013

In this Issue:

  1. A Governor's Guide to Early Literacy: Getting all Students Reading by Third Grade
      Source: National Governors Association - October 2, 2013
  2. Highlights of Outcomes Data for Young Children and Families Receiving IDEA Services in FY 2011-12
      Source: Early Childhood Outcomes Center - Retrieved October 4, 2013
  3. New Future of Children Journal Focuses on Military Children and Families
      Source: Princeton-Brookings - October 1, 2013
  4. How Economic Insecurity in Children Changed Over the Course of the Great Recession
      Source: Urban Institute - September 26, 2013

1. A Governor's Guide to Early Literacy: Getting all Students Reading by Third Grade

Source: National Governors Association - October 2, 2013

The National Governors Association (NGA) recently released a new guide, A Governor's Guide to Early Literacy: Getting all Students Reading by Third Grade (October 2013), which examines the gap between research and policy and describes five policy actions governors and other state policymakers can take to ensure that all children are reading at grade level by the end of third grade. The guide provides a framework that governors can use to take stock of what their states have accomplished, what they still need to work on, what resources they need, and which stakeholders they need to engage in order to move forward.

2. Highlights of Outcomes Data for Young Children and Families Receiving IDEA Services in FY 2011-12

Source: Early Childhood Outcomes Center - Retrieved October 4, 2013

The Early Childhood Outcomes Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), recently published two summaries highlighting outcomes data for young children with delays or disabilities and their families who received services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in FY 2011-12.

  • Outcomes for Children Served Through IDEA's Early Childhood Programs: 2011-12 (September 2013) - State Part C early intervention (EI) and Part B preschool programs report data annually on three child outcomes: (1) social relationships; (2) use of knowledge and skills; and (3) taking action to meet needs. In FY 2011-12, for Part C (birth through age 2), the percentage of children who showed greater than expected growth was between 66% and 73% across the three outcomes. For Part B-Preschool (ages 3 through 5), 80-81% of children showed greater than expected growth across the three outcomes.
  • Family Data: Indicator C4 Highlights Results and State Approaches, FFY 2011 (September 2013) - As part of their Part C annual performance report, states are required to report the percentage of families who report that EI services have helped them: (1) help their children develop and learn; (2) effectively communicate their children's needs; and (3) know their rights. For FFY 2011, 87% of families reported that EI services helped them help their children develop and learn, 88% reported that the services helped them effectively communicate their children's needs, and 91% reported that EI services helped them know their rights.

3. New Future of Children Journal Focuses on Military Children and Families

Source: Princeton-Brookings - October 1, 2013

The Fall 2013 issue of the Princeton-Brookings The Future of Children journal (Volume 23, Number 2) summarizes existing research on the risks and the resiliency of Military Children and Families. It also discusses new knowledge that is needed to better support the health and development of military children and includes articles on Military Children from Birth to Five Years, by Joy D. Osofsky and Lt. Colonel Molinda Chartrand, as well as Child Care and Other Support Programs, by Major Latosha Floyd and Deborah A. Phillips. The military's child care system serves approximately 200,000 children a day and is widely considered to be a model for the nation. According to a related policy brief, Keeping the Promise: Maintaining the Health of Military and Veteran Families and Children (Fall 2013) by Colonel Stephen J. Cozza, Ron Haskins, and Richard M. Lerner, there are approximately 2 million children of military families who are serving or have served in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

4. How Economic Insecurity in Children Changed Over the Course of the Great Recession

Source: Urban Institute - September 26, 2013

A new report from the Urban Institute documents how many children in the U.S. are living in economically insecure families, how economic insecurity changed between 2007 and 2010, and which children were most affected. Among other findings, the report shows that the rate of child poverty increased from 18% in 2007 to 22% in 2010 and the share of children living in food-insecure families rose from 13% to 22%. The share of children living in households that were doubling up and the share of children with an uninsured parent also grew. Additionally, the wealth of white families declined by 11%, Hispanic families had losses of 40% and black families had losses of 31%, thus widening the already enormous disparities in wealth accumulation that existed before the recession. The report also looks at whether children are receiving public program benefits and whether these programs appear to be meeting the needs of families with children.