August 13, 2003

In this Issue:

  1. New at the Child Trends DataBank
      Source: Child Trends DataBank - August 5, 2003
  2. Report Highlights State Actions and Ramifications for Enrollment of Children and Families in Health Coverage Programs
      Source: MCH Alert - August 8, 2003
  3. New Knowledge Paths Released
      Source: MCH Alert - August 8, 2003
  4. Research Brief Presents Findings on Public Perceptions of Child Well-Being
      Source: MCH Alert - August 8, 2003

1. New at the Child Trends DataBank

Source: Child Trends DataBank - August 5, 2003

The Child Trends DataBank now has new search capabilities that make it even easier to use!
* Users can now identify all indicators containing estimates by subgroup. For example:

- Do you want to know which indicators include separate estimates for black and white children, or for immigrants?
- Do you need indicators that include breakdowns by type of school attended (public vs. nonpublic)?
* Users can now easily find indicators by searching alphabetically
* Users can now access information with fewer "clicks" using the new pull-down menus

Go to http://www.childtrendsdatabank.org.

2. Report Highlights State Actions and Ramifications for Enrollment of Children and Families in Health Coverage Programs

Source: MCH Alert - August 8, 2003

Preserving Recent Progress for Health Coverage of Children and Parents: New Tensions Emerge presents the findings of a survey of Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program eligibility rules, enrollment and renewal procedures, and cost-sharing policies implemented in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2002 and the early part of 2003. The survey presented in this report, prepared for the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, is part of a series of surveys conducted over the last 3 years to track the strategies states are using to facilitate enrollment in health coverage programs. The report presents a discussion of the survey findings, describes state opportunities to protect health coverage programs, and offers conclusions. Information on the survey methodology and statistical tables are also included. The report is intended for use by policymakers, program administrators, and others in their efforts to improve access to health coverage for families with low incomes. The executive summary is available at http://www.kff.org/uninsured/upload/Preserving-Recent-Progress-on-Health-Coverage-for-Children-and-Parents-New-Tensions-Emerge.pdf, and the full report is available at http://www.kff.org/medicaid/upload/Preserving-Recent-Progress-for-Health-Coverage-of-Children-and-Parents-New-Tensions-Emerge-Report.pdf.

Readers: The Kaiser Family Foundation also released the survey findings presented in this report in a media and policy briefing titled Are We Holding the Line on Health Coverage for Low-Income Families? The briefing is available at http://www.kff.org/uninsured/20030729-index.cfm.

[Originally published in MCHAlert 2003 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

3. New Knowledge Paths Released

Source: MCH Alert - August 8, 2003

The Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT) Services knowledge path is an electronic guide on current, high-quality resources for health professionals and families about providing and strengthening EPSDT services. Produced by the MCH Library, the knowledge path includes guidelines for the frequency, timing, and content of health promotion and disease prevention services for infants, children, and adolescents. It is intended for use by health professionals, program administrators, and policymakers who are interested in tracking timely information on this topic. The knowledge path is available at http://www.mchlibrary.info/KnowledgePaths/kp_EPSDT.html.

The new edition of the Children and Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs knowledge path is an electronic guide on recent, high-quality resources for health professionals and families about caring for children and adolescents with special health care needs. Produced by the MCH Library, the knowledge path includes information on (and links to) Web sites and electronic publications; journal articles; books, reports, and other print publications; databases; and discussion groups and electronic newsletters. It is intended for use by health professionals, program administrators, educators, researchers, and parents who are interested in tracking timely information on this topic. The knowledge path is available at http://www.mchlibrary.info/KnowledgePaths/kp_CSHCN.html.

MCH Library knowledge paths on other maternal and child health topics are available at http://www.mchlibrary.info/KnowledgePaths/index.html. The MCH Library welcomes feedback on the usefulness and value of these knowledge paths. A feedback form is available at http://www.mchlibrary.info/KnowledgePaths/feedback.html.

[Originally published in MCHAlert 2003 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

4. Research Brief Presents Findings on Public Perceptions of Child Well-Being

Source: MCH Alert - August 8, 2003

How Children Are Doing: The Mismatch Between Public Perception and Statistical Reality presents findings from a study of how closely public perception matches official statistics on the characteristics and well-being of children in America. Child Trends designed three public opinion polls to assess the public's understanding of children's circumstances and well-being. The topics selected had implications for public policy; they included (1) the percentage of children living in poverty, (2) the percentage of children who have no health insurance, (3) the percentage of children with a parent who was born in a foreign country, (4) changes in the number of children receiving welfare, (5) changes in the number of children living in single-parent families, (6) changes in the teen birth rate, and (7) changes in the level of juvenile crime. Telephone interviews were conducted with nationally representative samples of adults living in the continental United States. About 1,000 adults were interviewed in each poll -- the first of which took place in May 2002, the second in October 2002, and the third between March and April 2003. Poll responses were compared to the best available data to assess the accuracy of the public's perceptions. The analysis also includes information on variations in perceptions, influences on perceptions, and implications for policy. The research brief is available at http://www.childtrends.org/Files//Child_Trends-2003_07_01_RB_PublicPerceptions.pdf

[Originally published in MCHAlert 2003 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]