July 19, 2013

In this Issue:

  1. Spring 2013 Issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice Available Online
      Source: Early Childhood and Parenting Collaborative - Retrieved July 18, 2013
  2. Research Findings - Young Children with Autism Benefit Regardless of High-Quality Treatment Model
      Source: Frank Porter Graham Child Development, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - July 18, 2013
  3. Six Research Reports on the Use of Socially Interactive Robots for Intervening with Young Children with Disabilities
      Source: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute - July 17, 2013
  4. Systematic Review of Studies Promoting the Use of Assistive Technology Devices by Young Children with Disabilities
      Source: Tots 'n Tech Research Institute - Retrieved July 19, 2013

1. Spring 2013 Issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice Available Online

Source: Early Childhood and Parenting Collaborative - Retrieved July 18, 2013

The Spring 2013 issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice (ECRP) is now available online. ECRP is an open-access, peer-reviewed, multilingual online-only journal published biannually by the Early Childhood and Parenting Collaborative at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The current issue includes a special section on parents' perspectives related to early care, education, and intervention. All past issues can also be accessed online.

2. Research Findings - Young Children with Autism Benefit Regardless of High-Quality Treatment Model

Source: Frank Porter Graham Child Development, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - July 18, 2013

A new FPG Snapshot summarizes research results from a study finding that preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) who receive high-quality early intervention make significant positive gains during the school year regardless of the comprehensive treatment model used (TEACCH, LEAP or a high-quality special education program without a specific model). The results may shift the field's thinking about treatment models for young children with ASD and may have important implications for special-education programs and school classrooms across the country. To learn more, see The LEAP and TEACCH Comprehensive Treatment Models: Comparing Outcomes for Preschoolers with Autism in High-Quality Classrooms (2013).

Full article citation: Boyd, B. A., Hume, K., McBee, M. T., Alessandri, M., Gutierrez, A., Johnson, L., ... Odom, S. L. (2013). Comparative efficacy of LEAP, TEACCH and non-model-specific special education programs for preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Advance online publication. doi:10.1007/s10803-013-1877-9

3. Six Research Reports on the Use of Socially Interactive Robots for Intervening with Young Children with Disabilities

Source: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute - July 17, 2013

The Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute has published six new research reports detailing findings from the Utility of Socially Interactive Robots Project. The project involved a series of studies using socially interactive robots for promoting children's social-emotional, joint attention, vocalization production, conversational turns, and language development. Participants in the studies were young children (18 months to 5 years) with disabilities and their families. The project focused on how interaction with social robots affects children's language and communication development.

4. Systematic Review of Studies Promoting the Use of Assistive Technology Devices by Young Children with Disabilities

Source: Tots 'n Tech Research Institute - Retrieved July 19, 2013

The Tots 'n Tech Research Institute has published a new research brief, Systematic Review of Studies Promoting the Use of Assistive Technology Devices by Young Children with Disabilities (Research Brief V.8, No.1, 2013), by Dunst, C.J., Trivette, C.M., Hamby, D.W., & Simkus, A. The brief summarizes findings from a meta-analysis of 109 studies investigating the use of five different assistive technology devices with young children with disabilities, including 1342 infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Results indicate that the use of all but one of the devices was related to improvements in child outcomes, regardless of type of disability or severity of intellectual delay. The importance of the use of evidence-based training methods to promote practitioners' and parents' use of assistive technology is also described.