March 15, 2013

In this Issue:

  1. New Invitation to Comment - State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015
      Source: U.S. Department of Education - March 11, 2013
  2. Does Special Education Improve Preschoolers' Academic Skills?
      Source: National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education - March 15, 2013
  3. Making a College Course Matter for Pre-K Professionals: Supports Needed for Success
      Source: National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education - Retrieved March 15, 2013
  4. New Snapshot Examines the Impact of Early Childhood Teacher Education
      Source: FPG Child Development Institute - March 11, 2013
  5. WWC Releases Updated Report on "Ladders to Literacy" Curriculum
      Source: Institute of Education Sciences, What Works Clearinghouse - March 12, 2013
  6. Governors' 2013 State of the State Addresses: Mentions of Early Care and Education
      Source: National Women's Law Center - Retrieved March 15, 2013
  7. Ethical and Policy Issues in Genetic Testing and Screening of Children
      Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - February 21, 2013

1. New Invitation to Comment - State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education - March 11, 2013

On March 11, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education posted a new Invitation to Comment on the annual, web-based State of Preschool survey, which centralizes data about publicly provided early childhood education opportunities. Data are collected from state agencies responsible for providing early childhood education and made available for secondary analyses. Data collected as part of the survey focus on enrollment counts in state-funded early childhood education programs, funding provided by the states for these programs, and program monitoring and licensing policies. The collected data are then reported, both separately and in combination with extant data available from federal agencies supporting early childhood education programs. Public comments are due on or before April 10, 2013.

2. Does Special Education Improve Preschoolers' Academic Skills?

Source: National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education - March 15, 2013

A new research brief published by the National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education (NCRECE) looks at the question, Does Special Education Improve Preschoolers' Academic Skills? (2013). The brief summarizes findings from a study that examined associations between enrollment in preschool special education and school readiness skills for children with mild to moderate delays. The results indicate that on average, children who received preschool special education services had lower scores in reading and math in kindergarten than similar children who did not receive services. The brief discusses several factors that could have influenced these results.

3. Making a College Course Matter for Pre-K Professionals: Supports Needed for Success

Source: National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education - Retrieved March 15, 2013

Another research brief recently published by the National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education (NCRECE) summarizes the results of a study that examined a new course developed to support early childhood professionals in implementing effective teacher-child interactions. The findings suggest that an effective course can be scaled-up and used in different settings when clear supports are put in place to ensure quality delivery. See Making a College Course Matter for Pre-K Professionals: Supports Needed for Success (2013).

4. New Snapshot Examines the Impact of Early Childhood Teacher Education

Source: FPG Child Development Institute - March 11, 2013

A special issue of the Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education addresses the question: For whom and in what ways does early childhood teacher education matter? A new Snapshot from the FPG Child Development Institute summarizes an article in the issue by FPG Senior Scientist Pam Winton and colleagues, who examined the current research base in early childhood teacher education. They note that there is a lack of rigorous research evidence, which makes it difficult to answer the question. Much of the research that exists is descriptive and focused on small samples of students in a few innovative programs. See The Impact of Early Childhood Teacher Education: How to Answer the Unanswerable Question (FPG Snapshot 68, February 2013).

Full article citation: Horm, D., Hyson, M., & Winton, P. (2013). Research on early childhood teacher education: Evidence from three domains and recommendations for moving forward. Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education, 34 (1) 95-112.

5. WWC Releases Updated Report on "Ladders to Literacy" Curriculum

Source: Institute of Education Sciences, What Works Clearinghouse - March 12, 2013

The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) has released an updated early childhood report on Ladders to Literacy, a supplemental early literacy curriculum composed of 60 activities designed to develop children's print/book awareness, metalinguistic awareness, and oral language skills. The Ladders to Literacy activities can be implemented in a variety of early childhood settings and adapted for children with special needs. The WWC found that Ladders to Literacy has potentially negative effects on oral language and no discernible effects on print knowledge, phonological processing, and math for preschool children. See the full report here.

6. Governors' 2013 State of the State Addresses: Mentions of Early Care and Education

Source: National Women's Law Center - Retrieved March 15, 2013

A new fact sheet from the National Women's Law Center (NWLC) shows that a total of 27 governors (as well as the mayor of the District of Columbia) referenced early care and education in their 2013 state of the state addresses - an increase from 22 governors in 2012 and 17 governors in 2011. The fact sheet provides excerpts from the speeches related to early care and education, as well as links to all of the governors' complete speeches. See Governors' 2013 State of the State Addresses: Mentions of Early Care and Education (March 2013).

7. Ethical and Policy Issues in Genetic Testing and Screening of Children

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics - February 21, 2013

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently released a new policy statement, Ethical and Policy Issues in Genetic Testing and Screening of Children, which appears in the February 21 online issue of the journal Pediatrics. The policy statement represents recommendations developed collaboratively by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. It addresses a variety of scenarios in which genetic testing and screening can occur.