February 8, 2013

In this Issue:

  1. Invitation to Comment - State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015
      Source: U.S. Department of Education - February 8, 2013
  2. Twelve New Reports of Home Visiting Research Available
      Source: Pew Home Visiting Campaign - Retrieved February 8, 2013
  3. Using Social Skills Training for Preschool Children with Disabilities
      Source: What Works Clearinghouse - February 5, 2013
  4. Updated! Education Commission of the States' Online Kindergarten Database
      Source: Education Commission of the States - February 4, 2013
  5. Head Start Launches Pilot Project to Encourage Innovation in Birth-to-5 Education
      Source: Office of Head Start - February 4, 2013
  6. Talking Points: Head Start and Refugee Provider Communication Guide
      Source: Office of Head Start - Retrieved February 8, 2013
  7. New Report: Early Childhood Education as an Essential Component of Economic Development
      Source: Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts - Retrieved February 4, 2013

1. Invitation to Comment - State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education - February 8, 2013

On February 8, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education sent out this reminder inviting comments on the proposed State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015. The preschool survey has been administered by the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) for the last nine years. However funding is running out and the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), a division of the U.S. Department of Education, is now proposing to collect data for the annual report. The full invitation to comment was published in the Federal Register on December 14, 2012. Public comments are due early next week on February 12, 2013.

2. Twelve New Reports of Home Visiting Research Available

Source: Pew Home Visiting Campaign - Retrieved February 8, 2013

The Pew Home Visiting Campaign recently published 12 new reports of home visiting research. The reports highlight those program elements that are essential to success, ways to improve existing models, and factors to consider in tailoring home visiting to local contexts and particular target populations. These studies underscore the need for continued evaluation and monitoring of home visiting services in order to maximize effectiveness as programs expand to serve more families in a greater diversity of settings. The full reports and executive summaries are available online.

3. Using Social Skills Training for Preschool Children with Disabilities

Source: What Works Clearinghouse - February 5, 2013

The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) has released a new report on the effectiveness of Social Skills Training for preschool children with disabilities. Social skills training is a collection of practices that use a behavioral approach for teaching preschool children age-appropriate social skills and competencies, including: communication, problem solving, decision making, self-management, and peer relations. After reviewing the research evidence, the WWC found that social skills training has positive effects on social-emotional development and behavior and no discernible effects on cognition for children with disabilities in early education settings.

4. Updated! Education Commission of the States' Online Kindergarten Database

Source: Education Commission of the States - February 4, 2013

The Education Commission of the States has launched an updated Online Kindergarten Database that provides state policy information as of December 2012 on the 50 states and DC. Information includes: whether a Child Must Attend Kindergarten, Kindergarten Entrance Age, Compulsory School Age, Kindergarten Readiness Assessments, Curriculum, Minimum Required Days/Hours for Kindergarten, Kindergarten Standards - General Info, and Teacher/Student Ratios.

5. Head Start Launches Pilot Project to Encourage Innovation in Birth-to-5 Education

Source: Office of Head Start - February 4, 2013

The Office of Head Start is launching a pilot funding opportunity in five communities to provide a comprehensive birth-to-5 Head Start / Early Head Start program, including services for expectant families. This new funding opportunity gives applicants flexibility to create a seamless birth-to-5 program incorporating both Head Start and Early Head Start funds. The pilot program is rolling out in Detroit, Baltimore, Washington D.C., Jersey City, and Sunflower County in Mississippi. These locations were specifically chosen because, together, they represent a wide variety of geographic and demographic challenges and opportunities. To learn more, see the full announcement.

6. Talking Points: Head Start and Refugee Provider Communication Guide

Source: Office of Head Start - Retrieved February 8, 2013

The Office of Head Start's National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness (NCCLR) and Bridging Refugee Youth and Children's Services (BRYCS), a national technical assistance provider for the Office of Refugee Resettlement, recently developed a guide to help support refugee families in Head Start. A refugee is any person who is outside their home country and unable to return because of fear of persecution. Almost all refugee parents with children up to five years of age will meet the income-based eligibility requirements for Head Start services when they first arrive in the United States. Talking Points: Head Start and Refugee Provider Communication Guide (2012) is a collaboration toolkit designed to promote effective partnerships between Head Start and Refugee Resettlement agencies.

7. New Report: Early Childhood Education as an Essential Component of Economic Development

Source: Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts - Retrieved February 4, 2013

A new report from the Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, discusses research findings on early childhood education programs and discusses how the universal provision of high quality early childhood education programs can make significant positive contributions to economic development, as well as general social well-being. See Early Childhood Education as an Essential Component of Economic Development; With Reference to the New England States (January 2013), by Arthur MacEwan.