January 25, 2013

In this Issue:

  1. New Issue of International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education Available Online
      Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - January 24, 2013
  2. Research Brief: Predicting Acceptance of Diversity in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms
      Source: National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education - Retrieved January 25, 2013
  3. Complex Thinking Skills Begin Forming As Early As 4.5 Years of Age
      Source: University of Chicago - January 23, 2013.

1. New Issue of International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education Available Online

Source: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education - January 24, 2013

The December 2012 issue of the International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE) is now available online. INT-JECSE is an open-access, peer reviewed journal offering scholarly articles on various issues related to young children with special needs (0-8 age) and their families. This issue features articles from Ghana, Turkey and the United States.

2. Research Brief: Predicting Acceptance of Diversity in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms

Source: National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education - Retrieved January 25, 2013

A recent study examined practices that acknowledge and promote diversity in pre-Kindergarten classrooms. Findings indicate that acceptance of diversity is a component of positive environments for young children, particularly in classrooms with high poverty levels where there is ethnic and linguistic diversity. However, it is rare for pre-Kindergarten classrooms to incorporate the highest levels of accepting and acknowledging diversity. To learn more, see the latest research brief from the National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education (NCRECE), Predicting Acceptance of Diversity in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms (2013), by Kay Sanders & Jason T. Downer.

3. Complex Thinking Skills Begin Forming As Early As 4.5 Years of Age

Source: University of Chicago - January 23, 2013.

New research findings from the University of Chicago and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill demonstrate that children begin to show signs of higher-level thinking skills as early as 4.5 years of age. Using large-scale longitudinal data from the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development study, the authors examined tests children took at age 4.5, when they were in first grade, third grade, and at age 15. Findings showed a strong relationship between high scores among children who, as preschoolers, had strong vocabularies and were good at monitoring and controlling their responses (executive function) to later ability on tests of understanding analogies. Research suggests that executive function may be trainable through pathways such as preschool curriculum, exercise and impulse control training. For more information, see the news release from the University of Chicago.

Full citation: Richland, L. E., & Burchinal, M. R. (2013). Early Executive Function Predicts Reasoning Development. Psychological Science, 24, 87-92.