October 12, 2012

In this Issue:

  1. First Quarter 2012 OSEP Policy Documents Now Available Online
      Source: U.S. Department of Education - October 8, 2012
  2. Instability and Early Life Changes Among Children in the Child Welfare System
      Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - Retrieved October 12, 2012
  3. School Readiness among Young Children in Black Immigrant Families
      Source: Migration Policy Institute - October 9, 2012
  4. Child Poverty and Its Lasting Consequence
      Source: Urban Institute - Retrieved October 11, 2012
  5. Advancing the Language Skills of Young Latino Children
      Source: New Journalism on Latino Children - Retrieved October 10, 2012
  6. Downward Slide: State Child Care Assistance Policies 2012
      Source: National Women's Law Center - October 11, 2012

1. First Quarter 2012 OSEP Policy Documents Now Available Online

Source: U.S. Department of Education - October 8, 2012

On October 8, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) posted its First Quarter 2012 Policy Letters (January 1 through March 31, 2012) online. These letters address issues related to the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). A Federal Register Notice published on September 13, 2012 includes brief summaries of the quarterly letters. A subset of OSEP policy letters related to the early childhood provisions of the IDEA (Part C and Part B, Section 619) can be accessed on the NECTAC Web site.

2. Instability and Early Life Changes Among Children in the Child Welfare System

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - Retrieved October 12, 2012

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services', Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) has published a new research brief, Instability and Early Life Changes Among Children in the Child Welfare System (2012). The brief uses data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being to describe the instability of caregivers/households among 1,196 children who were infants when they first became involved with the Child Welfare System for maltreatment. Most of these infants were exposed to multiple risk factors, such as abuse and neglect, caregiver substance abuse or mental illness, exposure to violence, and family economic hardship. Children with a higher number of risk factors were significantly more likely to have a higher number of caregiver/household changes at an age when having a stable caregiver is critical for the child's well-being and development. The report describes some evidence-based programs designed to work with children experiencing toxic stress related to maltreatment, removal, and abandonment.

3. School Readiness among Young Children in Black Immigrant Families

Source: Migration Policy Institute - October 9, 2012

The Migration Policy Institute has published a new report Patterns and Predictors of School Readiness and Early Childhood Success among Young Children in Black Immigrant Families (October 2012). Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Birth Cohort, the study finds that children in Black immigrant families from Africa, the Caribbean, and Latin America display stronger early academic skills than Hispanic children of immigrant and native parents, as well as Black children of native parents. The data indicate several parental factors are likely to support positive outcomes for these children, including: high rates of marriage, parental education and employment; English proficiency; very low rates of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use during pregnancy; and very high rates of breastfeeding. Black immigrant parents also report strong support of education for young children and are very likely to enroll their children in center-based care during their preschool years.

4. Child Poverty and Its Lasting Consequence

Source: Urban Institute - Retrieved October 11, 2012

The Urban Institute has published a new report, Child Poverty and Its Lasting Consequence (September 2012), which examines child poverty in the U.S. and ways to target particularly vulnerable children by answering four key research questions:

  • What share of newborns is poor, and how often do these children remain poor?
  • What family characteristics relate most strongly to childhood poverty persistence?
  • What are the implications of present-day childhood poverty for adult outcomes?
  • How do other family characteristics and childhood experiences relate to adult outcomes?

The report also provides insight into how young poor children can be helped.

5. Advancing the Language Skills of Young Latino Children

Source: New Journalism on Latino Children - Retrieved October 10, 2012

The New Journalism on Latino Children recently published Advancing the Language Skills of Young Latino Children (October 2012), which reviews the empirical research on the effects of quality preschool for Latino English learners; the efficacy of three instructional strategies for these children (English immersion, transitional bilingual education, and dual language immersion); and how facets of quality may enhance early learning. More than 20% of children entering kindergarten today in the U.S. are of Latino heritage and these children often enter school with weaker math and English preliteracy skills than their non-Latino peers.

6. Downward Slide: State Child Care Assistance Policies 2012

Source: National Women's Law Center - October 11, 2012

According to a new report from the National Women's Law Center (NWLC), families in 27 states are worse off under one or more key child care policies in 2012 than in 2011. Families are also worse off than a decade ago. NWLC's state-by-state report, Downward Slide: State Child Care Assistance Policies 2012, examines the impact of five factors that determine the affordability, accessibility, and quality of child care assistance in each state: income eligibility, waiting lists for assistance, copayments required of parents receiving assistance, reimbursement rates for child care providers, and eligibility for parents searching for a job.